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Wooden core good enough for my level? ( learner, intermediate)

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hi!
 

I am uprgading from waxless to ordinary x-country skis.

 

The current january package offers are on either madshus or fischer wooden core tour skis, which are right for the runs/ paths / little "off piste" I do.

 

But I wonder if wooden core ( presume balsa) laminate , without "air channel" weight reduction, are good enough for me as an intermeidate learner?

 

I am a heavy , strong tall guy: 240lbs 6'2" with a 35" inside leg. I aml currently learning to kick and glide to a higher level, and do a little skating when they lay the centre lanes up for this.

 

WIth two young kids, I would rather spend on them rather than necesserarily carbon fiber.

 

One issue I have is coming to a stop in plough! Since I oftne go out on unlaid paths and steep, narrow hills I wondered if steel edges were worth considering: I udnerstand they interfere with ordinary tracking in laid lanes.

 

Thanks in advance for opinions.

 

CF

post #2 of 8

 

if price isn't a big deal check out Asnes. FKNA good skis made by people who put the Nord in Nordic. Wife, sister and brother in law swear by them.
post #3 of 8
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Que View Post

And in case you can't read Noweigan http://www.neptunemountaineering.com/neptune/dept.asp?dept_id=3126&WT.svl=deptnav1
 


Fæaaen altså, eg måtte bare ut og lære meg norsk då. Sånn er det med reklamer for langrennskis.


Takk.

 

Yeah Åsnes are good and last a long time for tur skis. My wife has a set with original rottefella/rat traps and she just refused to swap them for the offer I am looking at for fishcer tur skis. Her Åsnes' are also light

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Takk skal du ha. Fææen altså, måtte ta krasjkurs i norsk i går kveld då.

 

Åsnes are certainly well made and quite light: my wife has a pair she jsut refused to change out for the deal on Fishcer touring skis I am getting tommorrow.

 

I just wondered if I should look to maybe getting some modern composite skis or for my level, if it is just a waste of time. Looks like a continued good season, so possibly I will get another set.

 

Steel edges though, too? Wha'dya think?

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camp Freddie View Post


Takk skal du ha. Fææen altså, måtte ta krasjkurs i norsk i går kveld då.



 



Åsnes are certainly well made and quite light: my wife has a pair she jsut refused to change out for the deal on Fishcer touring skis I am getting tommorrow.



 



I just wondered if I should look to maybe getting some modern composite skis or for my level, if it is just a waste of time. Looks like a continued good season, so possibly I will get another set.



 



Steel edges though, too? Wha'dya think?




 



Lol! Never know who you'll run into here. I am not the Nordic skier in the family but my wife just chimed in and said to get the steel edges. They might slow you down a tad on the groomed track but will more than compensate off or in descents.
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply!

 

It is nice to not have chair lifts and especially pommas to go slide about on snow.  You should give it a go, especially on skating skis.

 

Went Austrian in the end: I got a really whippy pair of Fischers, old stock- wood core as presumed-, super power wax ( oddly enough, also available waxless) : sound a bit like a special offer from a discreet manicurist in Rio de Janeiro.

 

 

Got the shop to prep wax them, and the wallies gave it just a very thin layer of grip on top of base without warning me, so the first half hour until I worked this out was painful.

 

Very pleased with 2 hours sliding mostly forward today. Don't know now if I actually would recommend wax-free for beginners like I learnt on, but at least I have a spare set of skis now for bad thaw backs and uncharted runs. Maybe I could lend them out to the Oslo VM, high chance it will be thaw-ee and ice--eey.

 

 

 

post #8 of 8

to answer your question, yes, you can use wood core skis with confidence even as a heavy strong skier.Even balsam wood cores have been used for the past 40 years and are still being used by the owners who never found a reason to change.

At 240 lbs, you have the luxury of not worring too much or paying extra to save 2 ounces of weight in your equipment. Some weight weenie skiers in winter are the same weight weenie bicyclists in summer.  If you wear bigger than a 10.5 shoe and not a racer, you are probably big enough not to worry too much about equipment weight.

 

Wood core skis will serve you nicely both in performance and reliability and budget. 

 

As a father, I do recommend that you carry a spare ski  tip with you for the chance that one of your kids eventually runs their ski into a tree and snaps the ski tip.  slipping a spare tip over the broken ski sure beats limping out of the forest or carrying your kid on your back a couple of miles.

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