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Marker Motion LT bindings - forward pressure - any markings?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I can't really trust the shops in the area, all of them don't know or just adjust my forward pressure on these bindings by feel...

I tried calling Marker Canada but they wouldn't give me information. Seriously I know they are protecting themselves from a lawsuit but I even told them I would sign a legal disclosure saying whatever I do is my fault...

anyway that's another topic to be discussed along with changing your own oil on your car, jacking up your car etc.. you get where I'm going smile.gif

So is there some markings to check for proper forward pressure on these bindings? I saw a few threads here showing different bindings having some sort of marking on the forward pressure.
post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 
Also to note, I can't find a shop in the area that actually uses some torque equipment or some other test bed to test release pressures (DIN settings) or forward pressure heel length.

The initial guy who set it up just did everything by hand, after looking at the DIN chart, no test at all.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Update:

I just talked to the head tech of the store that I bought my ski/bindings and they said that even MOST ski shops don't even have any torque testing equipment, they just go by faith/trust that the manufacture has tested and calibrated the DIN settings to make sure a DIN 4 reads 4 and 6.5 reads 6.5, I assume they trust whatever 'markings' the bindings have for the forward pressure/sole length adjustments as well.

I guess it's sort of how you trust a torque wrench to read 53.7 ft-lbs and you torque something on your car with that wrench, no one really questions the torque wrench readings... well unless you want to calibrate it using a hanging weight @ 90 degrees etc.

I'm an engineer so of course I will question and try to figure out things like ski bindings lol...
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlashEngineer View Post

Update:

I just talked to the head tech of the store that I bought my ski/bindings and they said that even MOST ski shops don't even have any torque testing equipment, they just go by faith/trust that the manufacture has tested and calibrated the DIN settings to make sure a DIN 4 reads 4 and 6.5 reads 6.5, I assume they trust whatever 'markings' the bindings have for the forward pressure/sole length adjustments as well.

I guess it's sort of how you trust a torque wrench to read 53.7 ft-lbs and you torque something on your car with that wrench, no one really questions the torque wrench readings... well unless you want to calibrate it using a hanging weight @ 90 degrees etc.

I'm an engineer so of course I will question and try to figure out things like ski bindings lol...


EVERY shop that is representing a binding manufacturers product line is REQUIRED to to have torque testing devises. This shop has NO CLUE and I would avoid that shop for ANY binding work, he NOT knows of what he speaks. 

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
It's a huge chain store in Canada..

www.sportchek.ca

He says that none of their stores have it and usually if any are tested are usually race skis or demo (rental) ones...

Well if anyone in GTA - Toronto, ON knows of a store that has and will test bindings DIN release and forward pressure, I'm all ears...
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Called another shop that's not a chain store, even they do not have equipment to test release torque/pressures... so maybe in Canada - Toronto, not many shops have this..
post #7 of 17

Philpug - Not in Canada.....  Most of the stores that are fully certified do not have tourque testing equipment.

 

Only country in the world where my bindings have been tourque tested - USA

 

 

As for sportchek.... Well yeah, um.... "Head Tech" means f-all....  That guy could have never been on snow in his life, but has done all the in-house training..... sometimes you get lucky and get a tech that is well into the sport, other times you'll get a hockey nut!

 

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramzee View Post

Philpug - Not in Canada.....  Most of the stores that are fully certified do not have tourque testing equipment.

 

Only country in the world where my bindings have been tourque tested - USA

 

 

As for sportchek.... Well yeah, um.... "Head Tech" means f-all....  That guy could have never been on snow in his life, but has done all the in-house training..... sometimes you get lucky and get a tech that is well into the sport, other times you'll get a hockey nut!

 


Yeah if that's the case, so why so many posts here saying get the DIN value torque tested...

No he's the head tech of whole area, like 5-7 stores, he's the manager for the mounting and bindings and other tech stuff.

Well I'm really not that worried about DIN release values, they are probably within +- 0.5-1.0 of the actual number, I don't think my 4.5 value would matter that much if it was 5.0 or 4.0 anyways. I'm not doing anything but green slopes...

I just want to be self informed and also I have not only 1 pair of boots, I have several and they are different sole length, main boot is 297mm, another is 306mm. So if I switch I would need to adjust the forward pressure/sole length heel adjustment.. I don't want to run to a store everytime, especially if they don't even have anything to test this, so I just wanted to know what they check or how they measure for the change.
post #9 of 17

That's because most on here are from south of the border! biggrin.gif

 

New bindings have pretty low variance from their indicated values..... Torque testing only becomes important if you have a set of older skis that have sat in the garage for the past few years.

 

Now as long as your DIN setting has been calculated properly from the DIN chart using your correct weight, height, boot sole length and ability then you should be fine as long as that is the setting indicated on your binding.

 

 

As for adjusting your binding to different boots, be aware this may affect your DIN setting.  Setting length and forward pressure is usually easy, but you really need someone to show you.  A good shop tech will show you how to do it (if you are getting something else done.... or take in a beer or two).... but remember that as soon as you touch any of the settings yourself, you waive any right to hold the shop accountable should you get injured.

 

Hopefully someone on here can point you to a good shop out East.............

 

 

 

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramzee View Post

That's because most on here are from south of the border! biggrin.gif

 

New bindings have pretty low variance from their indicated values..... Torque testing only becomes important if you have a set of older skis that have sat in the garage for the past few years.

 

Now as long as your DIN setting has been calculated properly from the DIN chart using your correct weight, height, boot sole length and ability then you should be fine as long as that is the setting indicated on your binding.

 

 

As for adjusting your binding to different boots, be aware this may affect your DIN setting.  Setting length and forward pressure is usually easy, but you really need someone to show you.  A good shop tech will show you how to do it (if you are getting something else done.... or take in a beer or two).... but remember that as soon as you touch any of the settings yourself, you waive any right to hold the shop accountable should you get injured.

 

Hopefully someone on here can point you to a good shop out East.............

 

 

 


Yeah hopefully they can help me out!

Well like I said, my boots are 297 and 306, not much variance, I think from looking up DIN charts, it isn't changed from those sole lengths anyways, so all I have to do is change the heel length/forward pressure. Also it's not just for me but if say a friend that weighs the same, same height and has similar boot size but different sole length, they can use my skiis if they just adjust that setting.
post #11 of 17

As discussed above, the right answer is to get them professionally adjusted.

 

Just so you are self-informed:

 

The Marker Motion LT (if its the rail binding on a pair of Volkls) has the foward pressure setting built into the fine adjustment screw at the back of the heel.

 

The correct setting is that the screw should be exactly flush with the plastic housing when the binding is closed (with a boot in it).

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NZskier View Post

As discussed above, the right answer is to get them professionally adjusted.

 

Just so you are self-informed:

 

The Marker Motion LT (if its the rail binding on a pair of Volkls) has the foward pressure setting built into the fine adjustment screw at the back of the heel.

 

The correct setting is that the screw should be exactly flush with the plastic housing when the binding is closed (with a boot in it).


Thank you, that's perfect, exactly what I needed!

I do understand the liability clauses and companies covering their end, but seriously, I've never taken any of my cars to the shop to get simple things done like oil changes, transmission fluid changes, clutch changes, brakes, axles etc.

I'm sure I'm not "qualified" as a mechanic but I've maintained 5 cars over a decade and they are fine. I'm sure a little ski binding screw is not too far outside of my technical ability. rolleyes.gif
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Oh and, the tech who originally did my binding, he didn't even put the boot in the second ski to check the forward pressure screw, he just screwed it in a bit and left it....

liability aside, who's more safe? Him or me trying to find the correct way.... biggrin.gif
post #14 of 17

I just took my Marker bindings (a system binding on K2s) to a shop to be adjusted when I bought new boots. I was too lazy to do that myself and anyway didn't find a screw driver rolleyes.gif I had to talk the guy all the way through the process. Needless to say they did it for free biggrin.gif

post #15 of 17

These bindings are the first ones that I have seen that have a tow & heel piece that have no forward pressure. There is no pressure setting at all.I set mine at a 58 newton meter release. The tow came out to be a 7 setting, and the heel pieces were 3 and 4 to achieve the release I desire.My initial assessment is that this binding is not high quality. I particapated in the SKI & Snowboard Workshop given at Hunter Mountain last year. There was no mention of a binding without a forward pressure setting.

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramzee View Post

Only country in the world where my bindings have been tourque tested - USA

 

 

They do torque testing here in Munich, Germany (land of DIN and TÜV)... even at the universal sports shop place that doesn't even carry ski gear for most of the year. They also measure in NM and took a reading of my leg/knee diameter in order to set the DIN. 

 

That leg measurement is something I've never had done in the U.S. 

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by NZskier View Post

As discussed above, the right answer is to get them professionally adjusted.

 

Just so you are self-informed:

 

The Marker Motion LT (if its the rail binding on a pair of Volkls) has the foward pressure setting built into the fine adjustment screw at the back of the heel.

 

The correct setting is that the screw should be exactly flush with the plastic housing when the binding is closed (with a boot in it).


flush for DIN's 5 and over. DIN settings 4.5 and under go to the grooved line just before flush.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Marker Motion LT bindings - forward pressure - any markings?