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Drills to improve skiing

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Does anyone know of some good 'drills' i can do on the slopes to generally improve skiing?

post #2 of 21

Carry two full mugs of beer while skiing down any run. Don't spill any. Have success? Repeat, but faster.

post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 

the beer prolly wouldnt make it up the lift

post #4 of 21

I often start the day by doing some exaggerated noodling turns with extreme upper lower body separation to get the twist form loosened up.

post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

the beer prolly wouldnt make it up the lift



I didn't say there weren't risks... beercheer.gif

post #6 of 21

Here's my general drill to improve all skiing thats not actually a drill:

 

 

 

When I'm on groomers, which is pretty much always a necessity rather than a choice, I am always doing something more than just skiing.

 

I sit on my ski tails and see how fast I can go and if I can turn them from that position.

 

I fence with imaginary enemies using my ski poles.

 

I jump up and down on my skis and "clap" my poles.

 

I ski backwards.

 

If the groomer is steep enough I try and lay into a turn so much I can touch the ground.

 

I put my poles between my legs and ride the pony.

 

I ski on one ski

 

I put my poles in one hand and use the other to conduct the symphonic version of whats on my ipod.

 

If its flat enough I try and poke my friend out of his binding.

 

I pick up snow to throw at friends / mountain safety rent a cops.

 

I try and do ski ballet moves on my skis 190+ skis (note this often may cause a crash).

 

And much more.

 

 

I do all this not as a drill but rather as an expression of the pure joy I get from skiing. Or just to keep from getting bored.

 

But all of this sillyness requires a lot of balance and for me, outside of all the babble I've read here on the forums or heard in various clinics, good skiing is really nothing more than the ability to move down the mountain in balance. Knowing where your balance is and how to move out of it for what ever reason, and more importantly how to move back into it, is the single most important skill in skiing IMO.

 

So jump up and down, play kids games, and just screw around when ever you can. It will help your balance immensely and more importantly its a lot of fun.

post #7 of 21

PhilT - Surprisingly a lot of wisdom those words !

post #8 of 21


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilT View Post

Here's my general drill to improve all skiing thats not actually a drill:

 

 

 

When I'm on groomers, which is pretty much always a necessity rather than a choice, I am always doing something more than just skiing.

 

I sit on my ski tails and see how fast I can go and if I can turn them from that position.

 

I fence with imaginary enemies using my ski poles.

 

I jump up and down on my skis and "clap" my poles.

 

I ski backwards.

 

If the groomer is steep enough I try and lay into a turn so much I can touch the ground.

 

I put my poles between my legs and ride the pony.

 

I ski on one ski

 

I put my poles in one hand and use the other to conduct the symphonic version of whats on my ipod.

 

If its flat enough I try and poke my friend out of his binding.

 

I pick up snow to throw at friends / mountain safety rent a cops.

 

I try and do ski ballet moves on my skis 190+ skis (note this often may cause a crash).

 

And much more.

 

 

I do all this not as a drill but rather as an expression of the pure joy I get from skiing. Or just to keep from getting bored.

 

But all of this sillyness requires a lot of balance and for me, outside of all the babble I've read here on the forums or heard in various clinics, good skiing is really nothing more than the ability to move down the mountain in balance. Knowing where your balance is and how to move out of it for what ever reason, and more importantly how to move back into it, is the single most important skill in skiing IMO.

 

So jump up and down, play kids games, and just screw around when ever you can. It will help your balance immensely and more importantly its a lot of fun.

 

actually your ridiculous-ness is awesome. and you mini paragraph is 100 percent right.
 

post #9 of 21

I second the idea to just work on balance. You can't ski on two skis well until you can ski on one ski well, so I always make a point of playing around with balance exercises when I'm skiing the gentle stuff - skiing on one ski, trying to turn on both edges (banana turns), stuff like that. It all helps.

post #10 of 21

Try, imitating a 4-6 y/o skier with the skis 3 feet apart (no poles of course). It helps exponentially with your balance.

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

the beer prolly wouldnt make it up the lift



I didn't say there weren't risks... beercheer.gif


I like the idea of increasing difficulty level with this drill.  A built-in progression.

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

Does anyone know of some good 'drills' i can do on the slopes to generally improve skiing?


Have a look here, Nicko.  it's an extensive article that contains a number of drills of the sort you're looking for,,, pics and all.  

 

http://www.yourskicoach.com/YourSkiCoach/Season_Starter_Program.html

post #13 of 21

Practice skiing with your boot completely unbuckled, save for maybe the top straps losely around.  Keep pressure on the front of the boot as always, but with this it will be exagerated and can help remind your mind/body what you should be doing.

 

Then do that one one ski.

 

And do it in the bumps.

 

Actually, do it everywhere.

post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 

cheers guys, the skiings coming along well. 

got put in my place when we got 40cm dump haha

post #15 of 21

One of my favourites:

Hold your poles in front of you, one hand near the handles the other near the baskets,  Keep the poles  (and your shoulders) horizontal by keeping the poles level with the horizon and keep facing the bottom of the hill as you ski down the hill turning back and forth as far as you can.

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

Does anyone know of some good 'drills' i can do on the slopes to generally improve skiing?

In order for one to be able to offer advice on how to improve skiing, one must have also needed, at some point in time, to improve his own skiing.  So yeah, I can't help you.

post #17 of 21


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowCat67 View Post

Practice skiing with your boot completely unbuckled, save for maybe the top straps losely around.  Keep pressure on the front of the boot as always, but with this it will be exagerated and can help remind your mind/body what you should be doing.

 

Then do that one one ski.

 

And do it in the bumps.

 

Actually, do it everywhere.



why should we be pressuring the front of our boot all the time?

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

cheers guys, the skiings coming along well. 

got put in my place when we got 40cm dump haha



40cm dump is alot easier to ski than anything else.

post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

cheers guys, the skiings coming along well. 

got put in my place when we got 40cm dump haha



40cm dump is alot easier to ski than anything else.



 was the first time in such deep snow, so it was just alot different to what im used to.

post #20 of 21

Hold your poles in the middle of the shaft, one in each hand, at arms' length in front of you, vertically, so that you're viewing the world through a pair of "goal posts".  Focus on a tree/rock/building/whatever down slope and do a series of short turns whilst keeping that object inside the goalposts.  Visually brings home the idea of upper body separation.

 

Balance your poles across the back of your wrists without holding onto the poles.  Keeps your arms in front, and your upper body (and arms) flat relative to the terrain.  Comes with the built-in consequence of having to hike back up if you drop a pole.  Note, the trick is to not look at the poles.

 

Ski without your poles for a run or three.  Tightens up balance and focuses your mind on your edges.  While you're doing that remember the first two drills and see if you've held that form.

 

Search the forum for "pivot slips", "thousand steps", "cowboy turns" and a bunch of others.  Actually search on "drills" and you'll find what you want.  The search engine is your friend.

 

Good luck.

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinbad7 View Post

Hold your poles in the middle of the shaft...



That's what she said.

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