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Releasing pressure & unweighting

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Question:

 

When I release my edges & transition into the new turn, I also feel a release of pressure.  Does this pressure release constitute unweighting?

 

Thanks in advance for your brief & to the point thoughts & discussion,

 

JF

 

post #2 of 11

Since I now spend my days working with complex excel spreadsheets... this is what one would refer to as a circular reference. 

post #3 of 11

     Quote:

Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

Since I now spend my days working with complex excel spreadsheets... this is what one would refer to as a circular reference. 


So where's the auto-suggestion to fix it? wink.gif

post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

When I release my edges & transition into the new turn, I also feel a release of pressure.  Does this pressure release constitute unweighting? 



It depends on when the "release of pressure" is occuring.  The probable answer is yes, you are unweighting.  But determining whether, in your case, this is good or bad depends on so many factors.  Questions that arise in my mind that I could satisfy if I were watching you ski might be: How acutely are you angulating?  Where are your feet in relation to each other during your turn, during your transitions, etc...  Where are your hands?  How steep is the terrain?  What sort of skis are you on?

 

Do you have photos of you skiing?  Even a 10 second video clip of a few linked turns would be massively helpful.  Many of us here could break that down frame by frame to give you the best possible answer.

post #5 of 11

Not in my book JF, unweighting and edge release are not synonymous to me.  I believe there has been lot's of muddied water around here lately and the use of unweighting has been one such term muddied.

 

I know you and I would agree on what unweighting is and how it can be accomplished.  

 

 

ps. Skied with Eric Lipton today at Squaw!  The guy rips!  He used terrain unweighting, rebound unweighting, up unweighting and down unweighting.

post #6 of 11

May I?

 

2009-01-05099.jpg

2009-01-05100.jpg2009-01-05101.jpg

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2009-01-05103.jpg

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post 

 

ps. Skied with Eric Lipton today at Squaw!  The guy rips!  He used terrain unweighting, rebound unweighting, up unweighting and down unweighting.


Thanks Bud.  These are the classic forms of unweighting that I have always known & dealt with & I am sure that Eric can blend them each efficiently & accurately as the situation requires.

 

My question is one that I have pondered over the years.  It has to do with the idea that if the skis are tilted on high edge angle there would be more pounds PSI than when they are flattened during the transition.  Does this make sense?  Kinda like loading & unloading.

 

Cirque, thanks for the pictures & the reminder of the great day we shared last season.  You left out my favorite, & the one I saved on my hard drive.

 

2009-01-05098 a.jpg

 

JF


Edited by 4ster - 1/6/11 at 7:23pm
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

Since I now spend my days working with complex excel spreadsheets... this is what one would refer to as a circular reference


LOL,  You are right, I've never been too good at posing questions.

 

JF

post #9 of 11

"Unweighting"? Well, strictly speaking, even if you are in mid-air, you still "weigh" XXX pounds. I prefer the Austrian term "entlasten" - literally "de-loading".

post #10 of 11

4-ster, its really quite simple. The reaction force acting upon us from under our skis is equal to the action force we load the skis with. If we suddenly de-load the ski then the reaction force goes away at the same time. So the release does not unweight us. You can try it where you sit. Press your open hand against the table hard and then relax. See, your hand does not jump back up from the table surface. As soon as you stopped pressing the reaction force caused by the pressing whent away.

 

Small experiment. In order to unweight you need to eather de-accellerate your CoM upwards, lift your arm up in front of you with a lose relaxed wrist and hault it, or accellerate your CoM downwards, lower your arm from a standstill in front of you. Pay close attention to how your hand moves. As you lift your arm up and hault it your hand continues and then drops back. That was up-unweighting. As you drop your arm your hand laggs behind, that is down-unweighting. Play arround with combinations of both. Lift your arm up and then lower it in the same motion. That is UUW + DUW. That gives your hand a long time of unweighting. Dropping your arm down and then lifting it up makes your hand slap as it goes down low.

 

By turning or using terrain features or leg extention and flexion movements we can accellerate or de-accellerate our CoM upwards or downwards and therethrough achieve unweighting and increased or reduced pressure under our skis. The release is a component in the formula. The release in itself does not cause unweighing.

 

Martin, nothing prevents us from staring to use the Austrian term de-loading Very descriptive.VeryVeryk

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the remarks.  It has been a long time since I have really studied physics, just the basics.  I am a very kinestetic skier but it is nice to relate some of these feelings to what is actually going on.

Thanks,

JF

 

 

 

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