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Wanting to Buy Skis...no clue where to start

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

First time poster, hopefully not the last. 

 

I'm not a super experienced skier, having only been up to the resorts 3 times(skied at Keystone (3 days), Breck (4 days), A-Basin (1 day), Vail (1 day) and Copper (1 day) . That being said, I ski blues with no trouble, and blacks with no moguls with very little trouble. I'm interested in investing in my own gear, because I see it as a waste to keep renting skis when I could put my money into skis everytime I ski. 

 

I'm not really wanting to spend more than $400, but from my very brief glances, that seems like it would be hard to do with skis, bindings, poles and boots. Anyone have any suggestions for an approach to getting decent gear without breaking the bank?

 

Thanks in advance. 

Matt

post #2 of 24

I got good skis from Evo.com for $470 shipping/bindings included, but it cost me $60 to get them mounted.  You could talk to them. 

But that is w/o the boots.  You could try Ebay for a used boot, but that is taking a big chance, you really should try them on.  Also, if you buy used, make sure the bindings are adjustable w/o redrilling.  You should be able to get a decent used set of boots and skis for that price.  Maybe try Craigslist or a shopper mag and go and try the boots on before you buy them.  I bet lots of people would love to sell 2-4 yr old skis for $200, but find them.

I think <$400 is possible, but will take some detective work. 

post #3 of 24

Get 80's vintage skis outta the garbage of some trendy joker who thinks they need new gear.  You'll transition into a great mogul skier in no time.  Save your money for lift tickets and whiskey.

post #4 of 24


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMagician View Post

Get 80's vintage skis outta the garbage of some trendy joker who thinks they need new gear.  You'll transition into a great mogul skier in no time.  Save your money for lift tickets and whiskey.


HAHA, couldn't be more wrong.  There is a reason, after all, that straight skis have been replaced.  They're old, outdated, and downright dangerous.  Go treat yourself to a nice pair of couple year old used skis.

post #5 of 24

Wrong man, flat out wrong.  Doubt me? Come ski.  I pick the mountain.  You buy the lift ticket. 

 

The reason straight skis are not made anymore is because ski manufacturers have realized that the money is in convincing the masses of intermediates that they are experts, not in building the skis that only experts can ski on.

 

If you can't ski on straight skis.  You do not fully know how to ski.  You are hiding behind the new equipment.  In other words.  You cannot possibly know yourself to be more than an intermediate.  I predict stem christies for you on straight skis, while I do royal christies in bumps.  Don't know what a royal christie is?  Look it up and then try it on 207's.  Lol.

 

Let's you and me trade skis for one run.  I'll be waiting for you at the bottom looking at my watch while ski patrol peels you off a tree 100 yards from the top of the hill because you couldn't turn my skis even once.

 

There's a reason that injuries and deaths have gone UP since the gear changed.  Every gaper that's had a few lessons can carve them and then gets out of control because they lack the years of experience that it takes to truly know how to ski.  They're also rough on the knees, rough on the core, rough on the lower back, squirly... and girly looking being all short like that.

 

Not kidding, and not just trying to get a rise outta you. (i.e. not fishing)  I'll stand by this out on the mountain.  I welcome the opportunity to prove it.  I've only ever met one person that could keep up with me.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skimadriver View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMagician View Post

Get 80's vintage skis outta the garbage of some trendy joker who thinks they need new gear.  You'll transition into a great mogul skier in no time.  Save your money for lift tickets and whiskey.


HAHA, couldn't be more wrong.  There is a reason, after all, that straight skis have been replaced.  They're old, outdated, and downright dangerous.  Go treat yourself to a nice pair of couple year old used skis.


Also... I own three pair of the new skis.  I was required to use them when instructing because my bosses were afraid that their customers wouldnt buy new skis from the ski shop if their instructor was on 207's.  They all sit in the basement unused, unless my old man borrows them, which he has to because his body is too beat up from years of bike racing to ski aggressively like he used to.  I'll admit that my Volkl P40's don't completely suck, but seriously I get way more enjoyment out of making fools out of everyone on the hill by doing that which you all seem to think is impossible, but actually used to be the status quo throughout the sport.

post #6 of 24

OK, I support your love for old straight skis.   They just aren't perfect for everyone.  Like you have said, shaped skis make it easier to ski, and so someone who has only skied a couple of times would be much better suited on a pair of shape skis.  

post #7 of 24


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMagician View Post

Wrong man, flat out wrong.  Doubt me? Come ski.  I pick the mountain.  You buy the lift ticket. 

 

The reason straight skis are not made anymore is because ski manufacturers have realized that the money is in convincing the masses of intermediates that they are experts, not in building the skis that only experts can ski on.

 

If you can't ski on straight skis.  You do not fully know how to ski.  You are hiding behind the new equipment.  In other words.  You cannot possibly know yourself to be more than an intermediate.  I predict stem christies for you on straight skis, while I do royal christies in bumps.  Don't know what a royal christie is?  Look it up and then try it on 207's.  Lol.

 

Let's you and me trade skis for one run.  I'll be waiting for you at the bottom looking at my watch while ski patrol peels you off a tree 100 yards from the top of the hill because you couldn't turn my skis even once.

 

There's a reason that injuries and deaths have gone UP since the gear changed.  Every gaper that's had a few lessons can carve them and then gets out of control because they lack the years of experience that it takes to truly know how to ski.  They're also rough on the knees, rough on the core, rough on the lower back, squirly... and girly looking being all short like that.

 

Not kidding, and not just trying to get a rise outta you. (i.e. not fishing)  I'll stand by this out on the mountain.  I welcome the opportunity to prove it.  I've only ever met one person that could keep up with me.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skimadriver View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMagician View Post

Get 80's vintage skis outta the garbage of some trendy joker who thinks they need new gear.  You'll transition into a great mogul skier in no time.  Save your money for lift tickets and whiskey.


HAHA, couldn't be more wrong.  There is a reason, after all, that straight skis have been replaced.  They're old, outdated, and downright dangerous.  Go treat yourself to a nice pair of couple year old used skis.


Also... I own three pair of the new skis.  I was required to use them when instructing because my bosses were afraid that their customers wouldnt buy new skis from the ski shop if their instructor was on 207's.  They all sit in the basement unused, unless my old man borrows them, which he has to because his body is too beat up from years of bike racing to ski aggressively like he used to.  I'll admit that my Volkl P40's don't completely suck, but seriously I get way more enjoyment out of making fools out of everyone on the hill by doing that which you all seem to think is impossible, but actually used to be the status quo throughout the sport.



your bosses were afraid that you couldnt show modern movement on 207. which you cant. Challenge people on the internet......... are really sure you want to do that? what mountain do you want to ski at? I can arrange myself to be there.

 

How about this show up to MRG vertical challenge on whatever you want and try to beat me. My guess is you will be lucky to get past 20 laps.

post #8 of 24
Challenge people on the internet......... are really sure you want to do that? what mountain do you want to ski at? I can arrange myself to be there.

 

How about this show up to MRG vertical challenge on whatever you want and try to beat me. My guess is you will be lucky to get past 20 laps.



 


That was actually exactly what I was thinking. @mastermagician, come to Mad River Glen and I am sure that both bushwackerinPA will make sure we are there with you to get ski patrol when it is YOU plastered to a tree on Paradise.

 

post #9 of 24

February 25th?  I shall clear my schedule.

post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMagician View Post

February 25th?  I shall clear my schedule.



Scratch that.  They've changed the date.  It's on March 5th, a Friday.  I will be there.

post #11 of 24

@ Master Magician

 

If you can hit a target with a gun made during the civil war better than I can with a modern gun with a scope and higher precision etc. Are you a better marksman.... yes.

 

But is that really an argument for using the civil war gun? Whether or not you are as awesome as you claim to be, wouldnt you rather be using newer technology, a better marksman would be even better with a modern gun. Hence, new ski technology is good for everyone, helping intermediates ski better and experts dominate.

post #12 of 24


I appreciate that you understand my fundamental point.  And because you're cool about it.  I will acknowledge your right not to share my conclusion.  However I will continue to disagree.  Thanks for having boatloads more maturity than some others.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RockSlide View Post

@ Master Magician

 

If you can hit a target with a gun made during the civil war better than I can with a modern gun with a scope and higher precision etc. Are you a better marksman.... yes.

 

But is that really an argument for using the civil war gun? Whether or not you are as awesome as you claim to be, wouldnt you rather be using newer technology, a better marksman would be even better with a modern gun. Hence, new ski technology is good for everyone, helping intermediates ski better and experts dominate.

post #13 of 24

Also, Catholic metal, thats an oxymoron. Metal is about Satan devil.gif

post #14 of 24

hijack.gif

 

Anyway, @mattgrace - I recommend spending your money THIS season on boots. Good boots. That's probably the best investment you can make. Go to a good boot fitter and have it done right. Then spend the rest of the season demoing/doing high-end rentals (kind of the same thing). I think demoing tends to cost a little less or about the same as renting (although I can't be certain - I haven't rented in a long time). By the end of the season, get an idea what you want. Then start looking at how the skis you've demoed/liked have changed over the past few years. You'll have some that have stayed relatively the same and some that have changed dramatically. If you find one you like that has stayed relatively the same, look for a model a year or two old at the end of the season. Powder7.com and geartrade.com are good places to start. I am sure other folks on here know of better places to look.

 

So, this isn't the quick fix for $400 that you were looking for, but it seems like the best way to go about it . . . IMHO.

post #15 of 24


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DSloan View Post

hijack.gif

 

Anyway, @mattgrace - I recommend spending your money THIS season on boots. Good boots. That's probably the best investment you can make. Go to a good boot fitter and have it done right. Then spend the rest of the season demoing/doing high-end rentals (kind of the same thing). I think demoing tends to cost a little less or about the same as renting (although I can't be certain - I haven't rented in a long time). By the end of the season, get an idea what you want. Then start looking at how the skis you've demoed/liked have changed over the past few years. You'll have some that have stayed relatively the same and some that have changed dramatically. If you find one you like that has stayed relatively the same, look for a model a year or two old at the end of the season. Powder7.com and geartrade.com are good places to start. I am sure other folks on here know of better places to look.

 

So, this isn't the quick fix for $400 that you were looking for, but it seems like the best way to go about it . . . IMHO.


I agree with this, if money is limited, and you can only get one thing, you should probably get a decent pair of boots. Good boots are the gateway to skiing well, without them, $1000 skis will ski terribly.

post #16 of 24

I don't agree with getting "this season's" boots.  Definitely focus on the boots, but boot technology has not changed much in the last few years.  There's no reason to drop 2-3X as much on boots just for this season's.  Especially at the level OP's at where if he continues to ski and improve, will probably want better equipment in a few years.

 

$400 is definitely do-able if you know where to look.  check out www.levelninesports.com

They have brand new equipment from a couple years ago for very good prices.  Find something appropriate for your level, but at the same time you can grow into a bit.

 

I would say for intermediate level equipment at the site I mentioned, you're looking at:

$150 - boots

$150-$200 - skis + bindings

$50 - misc stuff like goggles/poles

$50 for a helmet ( get this at a local shop and make sure to try it on for good fit)

 

Best of luck!

 

also, MasterMagician, just because you're stubborn and aren't willing to learn some techniques to ski on modern equipment doesn't mean its bad for everyone else.  World cup skiers didn't switch to shaped skis for no reason.  No doubt someone can be good skiing on old equipment.  Doesn't mean they can't ski better on new equipment once they make the adjustments.  Also, gapers carving after a few lessons?  you gotta be kidding me.  If you really think this is true, you obviously have no idea how to carve and no idea what carving really is.  No matter where I go, 99% of people cannot carve a clean turn and yet 99% of people go on and on sitting on a ski lift about how they were carving down the mountain.  And "girly looking because they're short"?  Do you feel the need to ski longer skis because you're trying to make up for something else?

 

post #17 of 24

just realized Dsloan said "get boots this season", not "this season's boots".  HA!  I skim too quick.  Anyways totally agree with that.  Don't just randomly buy boots off the internet unless you know exactly what you're doing.

post #18 of 24

Was just surfing at Moosejaw, realized they have a ton of discount skis available.

 

OP please see http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/shop/search_Downhill-Skis____

post #19 of 24

Like some others have mentioned - start with a good pair of boots.  If you're really interested in just getting some experience and trying to improve, there are a lot of places to find some decent used skis.  Check out http://www.galacticsnowsports.com Its where I went to buy my kid's first skis.  Cheap enough and good enough (in my opinion anyways).

 

post #20 of 24

+ 1 more.  Get boots from a good bootfitter.  Then, demo skis for a bit to get a feel for how you're progressing, where you're skiing etc.  Then, come back to the forum and post the same question about skis, but include what you've tested, what you liked (and why), what you didn't like (and why).  Off the back of that you'll get some informed opinions recommending at least a dozen skis for you to buy, and you'll be able to narrow things down and find a bargain basement used ski that will be perfect for you.  The money you save on the skis come the time of purchase will cover much of the cost of the boots.  Happy days!

post #21 of 24

I agree with the above 100%.  Boots should definitely be your top priority.

post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 

Appreciate the advice. I really didn't realize you could demo skis and the like, but i think that sounds like really good advice. I like the idea of good boots, is there anything particular to avoid/look for when i look at boots? are there brands to avoid or ones that are above and beyond better than others? i don't mind paying better money for a quality product that is going to last but i was just hoping to get some stuff on the cheap if i could. sounds like that's not possible exactly, but it does sound like it can be done without breaking the bank 

post #23 of 24

Boots vary based on the shape of your foot, the length of your achilles tendon, etc. There are some great boot fitters on this forum. Go to the Ask the Boot Guys forum (http://www.epicski.com/forum/list/73) to get some help.

post #24 of 24

BOOTS  BOOTS BOOTS I could go on and on. Where are you located? I think many of us could give you a good place or two to start your BOOT search. Some advice from my most recent search is to try on as many different boots both size and brand to feel the differences and go to different shops as they tend to carry different brands. Beware of the big chain stores. I tried on just about every boot out there and went to several shops before I found the right fit. Once you have boots you can finds good cheap skis.

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