EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Snowboarding Discussions, Gear and Instruction › trying to get advice for a friend who is new to snowboarding. He is 6'1'' and 220, what size board? Has anyone been to one of Burton's Learn to Ride clinics?
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trying to get advice for a friend who is new to snowboarding. He is 6'1'' and 220, what size board? Has anyone been to one of Burton's Learn to Ride clinics?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

suggestions? 

post #2 of 9

It is better to determine the size after you select a board

post #3 of 9

There are a lot of factors to consider. What's the budget? How fast is he progressing? Where is he going to ride (i.e. soft or hard snow)? Interested in park riding vs mountain riding. What's the foot size?

 

I'm 5' 10" and 230 and an advanced rider. I ride a 168cm wide board that is stiff. This is probably too much for for your friend. My guess is a 150cm board would be too small. So somewhere in that range. The best advice is to find a good local shop. Online, an outfit like The House that provides phone consultation is the next best thing.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

He has not tried the sport yet but with his skiing/skateboarding background is confident that he will like it.  He will be riding in the Northeast.  Snow conditions will vary depending on the day, no park riding.  Not sure on his foot size.  A friend of his has  a Burton Custom 154 with the new style binding cutouts (board is prob 3 years old) that he wants to buy for $200 (minus bindings, bottom is ok, top deck a little beat up). I advised him to take a lesson or two and then wait for the end of season sales if he really wants to get into the sport.

post #5 of 9

He should get boots first.

 

The board's width is more important than length, make sure his boots fit on it without toes or heels sticking out too much. He probably has pretty big feet, so he needs a wide board.

 

A little overhang is OK. I have size 11 1/2 feet and my freeride board is 255mm wide.

 

His board should be about chin high, so as TheRusty suggests 155-160cm.

post #6 of 9

Renting first is a great idea. The beauty of renting for the first couple of days is that the rental boards at most resorts are beginner boards. These boards are more flexible and have higher edge bevels. These make it much easier to learn. The other thing that you can do with rentals is change the size to find what size is good for you.

 

The custom board may not be wide enough for your friends feet. The custom wide is a lot stiffer than the regular custom and probably not appropriate for a beginner.

post #7 of 9

I'd 2nd the suggestion on boots first.  Your friend sounds like a larger guy and if his feet match, then the width of the board will matter more than nearly anything else.

 

I wear a size 13 shoe.  This means I'm going to have a bit of heel & toe overhang and solutions including playing with the angles along with risers to eliminate toe/heel drag.  Learning how to snow board is better without doing a toe side turn and catching on your toes.  

 

Some boards have wider versions for people with large feet, while others (some of those with the cool graphics) seem to be stuck in a one size fits all.  I wound up with a couple of Arbors which meet my needs (graphics, wide enough and matches the variety of terrain I want to encounter)

post #8 of 9

Board lengths are based on weight, not height.  So the "up to your chin" thing has no real meaning.  Most boards for your weight range will probably end up there though.

 

Look for a more forgiving board.  Probably one that is recommended in the intermediate skill level.  Also, a rocker board is going to be easier to learn on than a cambered.  Some may argue that learning on a rockered board will cause you to learn some bad habits that will shine through on a cambered model.  There is probably some truth to this.  The thing is, I don't really see camber making a huge comeback.  This rockered stuff is just too much damn fun.

 

So figure out what board he is interested in and look up the weight recommendations for size. 

 

Also, as mentioned, boots are key. Definitely get them first.  That is the one spot to not skimp on.  Just like skiing.  If your feet are miserable, than your day will be miserable.  So if the budget is limited, spend the money there. 


Edited by killclimbz - 2/6/11 at 4:00pm
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all of the info.  I will direct him to this thread to get him heading in the right direction with his purchases.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Snowboarding Discussions, Gear and Instruction › trying to get advice for a friend who is new to snowboarding. He is 6'1'' and 220, what size board? Has anyone been to one of Burton's Learn to Ride clinics?