New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

question about pivot slip

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

 

I was in a ski class today and we were trying to pratice a move which looks a lot like the pivot slip. The instructions went something like this:

 

1. slide sideways and backwards - I think the backwards part is to help pick up some speed?

2. turn the upperbody down the hill and put all weight on the uphill ski and I guess there is a twistying

   motion in there?

3. the body will pivot and a nice 180+ degree turn will be the result

 

In my case I can slide sideways/backwards no problem but I'm feeing a lot of resistance when trying to bring the skis around. Sometimes the skis come around part way but I don't get the full rotation.

 

I looked at a few threads about the pivot technique and the steps look a little different. What can I focus on to help finish the maneuver?

 

I have 4 days of skiing left so I'm hoping to master the technique in order to improve my bump skiing. The class I'm in is a level 7 class and pretty much all the students are having difficulty w/ this...

 

thanks,

Paul.

post #2 of 9

I'm guessing without seeing you do it but it sounds like you aren't forward enough.  In order to rotate the skis in a pivot slip, you have to be in the neutral position.

 

http://vimeo.com/channels/l3skiing#7407274

post #3 of 9

it is difficult move, your coach isnt making it easier on you though.

 

the reason why he had you slide forward and backward is because their is pretty big for and aft component to being able to do pivot slips Your should learn to do this countered. countered means that you hips and shoulders are mostly pointing down the hill.

 

when you are are countered you are not on your uphill ski, its pretty close to 50/50 during the entire move. If you can only get part of the way around here is what may be happening.

 

1. the most common reason I see in most good skiers is simply they are nervous about moving down the hill with their body and or their balance skills lack when their skis get pointed straight down.

 

2. you maybe twisting your skis from you body instead of your legs only

 

3. your fine edging skills arent yet refined enough.

 

take some video post it up. it will make it a tons easier for us.

 

 

 

post #4 of 9

Paul1ski1, dont you mean that your skis pivot? Not your body! To me it sounded like a one footed release drill while sliding down the hill. I dont understand the sliding part.

post #5 of 9

When learning to do the pivot slip I found that I had to let my center of mass go further down the hill.  It is sort of a controlled fall where your feet move along keeping up with your body.  When I got it right it felt like my skis were on ball bearings.  I sometimes have a hesitation when my feet are pointing straight down the hill.  This indicates to me that I didn't let my COM go far enough down the hill.

 

It's a feel thing that comes with practice.  It's being willing to let yourself go there and let it happen.

 

I get it right about 80% of the time now.  I love doing them.

post #6 of 9

great post terry.

 

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

 

Thanks guys for the posts. I decided to take a lesson in the afternoon ( at Taos ) and I made some pretty good progress. Here is what I found:

 

For slipping/sliding/pivoting

 - my ankles were really too stiff - once I flexed my ankles but kept them loose, I immediately saw some difference

 - the old big toe/little toe exercise also helped my skis twist around me

 - we praticed 360 degree twists and I found that pretty tricky but I'm getting better at it

 

After some of the above drills, we went into some easy bump runs and these tips helped:

 - just relax overall when initiating a turn around a bump

 - have the upper body lead the feet

 - use the next lower bump to slow speed - in other words avoid the rut

 - keep the skis on the snow at all times

 

After doing the easier runs we headed over to Spencers, Snakedance, and Al's Run and I was able to link 1-3 turns at a time.

These runs are pretty damn steep for me but my turns kept pretty relaxed and I feel like I now have some good tips to work

on. I only get to ski 5-10 days a year so for me this progress is pretty good.

 

thanks,

Paul.

 

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square View Post

When learning to do the pivot slip I found that I had to let my center of mass go further down the hill.  It is sort of a controlled fall where your feet move along keeping up with your body.  When I got it right it felt like my skis were on ball bearings.  I sometimes have a hesitation when my feet are pointing straight down the hill.  This indicates to me that I didn't let my COM go far enough down the hill.

 

It's a feel thing that comes with practice.  It's being willing to let yourself go there and let it happen.

 

I get it right about 80% of the time now.  I love doing them.


 

CoM further down the hill.... yes, balance over the outside ski

Controlled fall..... yes, good skiing is controlled falling

Feet keeping up with the body... yes, some say skiing starts from the feet but I say your skis are there to support your CoM

Ball bearings.... yes, skiing is moving

Hestitation/COM not far enough.... yes, hesitation is your worst enemy causing inside ski pressure and banking

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul1Ski1 View Post

 

Thanks guys for the posts. I decided to take a lesson in the afternoon ( at Taos ) and I made some pretty good progress. Here is what I found:

 

For slipping/sliding/pivoting

 - my ankles were really too stiff - once I flexed my ankles but kept them loose, I immediately saw some difference

 - the old big toe/little toe exercise also helped my skis twist around me

 - we praticed 360 degree twists and I found that pretty tricky but I'm getting better at it

 

After some of the above drills, we went into some easy bump runs and these tips helped:

 - just relax overall when initiating a turn around a bump

 - have the upper body lead the feet

 - use the next lower bump to slow speed - in other words avoid the rut

 - keep the skis on the snow at all times

 

After doing the easier runs we headed over to Spencers, Snakedance, and Al's Run and I was able to link 1-3 turns at a time.

These runs are pretty damn steep for me but my turns kept pretty relaxed and I feel like I now have some good tips to work

on. I only get to ski 5-10 days a year so for me this progress is pretty good.

 

thanks,

Paul.

 



Great, you have discovered the technial line smile.gif

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching