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Analyze this picture?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I know it's tough to analyze technique from one picture but it's the only good picture I have like this.  I've been skiing for years, haven't taken a lesson in years and am just really curious as to what people may have to say about my technique.  So please let me have it.  Whatever you can point out is great.  Thanks!

 

Utah1

 

Utah2

post #2 of 11
Nice, clear photo, but without knowing more about the moments prior and the moments after the image-moment any analysis would be questionable.

Perhaps if you posted a bit of additional info:
1) What was the turn radius of the current turn?
2) What was to be the turn radius of the next turn?
3) where are you in relation to Transition? (Just before? Just starting? Middle?)
4) How fast were you going?
5) How much were your skis drifting laterally vs. moving along the skis?
6) Were you flexing at that image-moment, extending or remaining about the same?
7) Are you preparing to unweight into the next turn or planning to move smoothly through transition?

These few bits of added info would help greatly with analysis.

The terrain looks to be semi-packed powder and sloped about 25-30-degrees, yes?

.ma
post #3 of 11

Not an analysis but impressions from that one still pic---

 

--Is your right hand back?  It could (should) be higher and more forward.  And the left hand lower.

--You'll have too much arm movement when you plant your poles.  Arm movement can get the body out of position and cause the skis to lose grip.  Just a wrist twitch is adequate body movement for pole taps on firm snow.

--Are you back on your heels?  Hard to tell, and your ski tips seem to be engaging the snow well, but your shoulders look back in that pic.

--Can you bring your shoulders more over your outside ski and lighten the weight on the inside ski?

post #4 of 11

The terrain definitely does not look like it's 25-30 degrees.  30 degree is pretty dang steep advanced/expert terrain, that judging by the looks of the guy behind him, would never venture onto.  Most beginners would look at it from the top and claim it looks vertical. 

 

I know pictures tend to flatten out terrain, but looking at the trees, I'd say 15-20 degrees at best.  I'm gonna guess it's probably a green or blue run.

 

It's hard to tell from one picture.  What type of turn were you trying to achieve?  Are you trying to make a carved turn, a brushed turn, or a more defensive turn to scrub speed?

 

The lack of any visible trails behind you and what seems to be an overly excessive amount of spray seem to point to too much tail pushing at the end of the turn.  Was this the desired result you were looking for on this particular turn?  But again, it's tough to say not knowing snow conditions and only getting this one point in time view.  Also, from this angle, it looks like you're leaning back onto the tails of the skis a bit.

post #5 of 11

Did not read the previous postings so here is tdk unbiassed. Good photo. Nice snow. Nice pist. No croud. Lost of snow. Great day for skiing. Good solid stance and obviously in controll. Ok, looking at your photo a second time I at once pick up on your phat skis and your aft position. However, the thing that strickes me the most is that you are raicing your arm for the pole plant way too early. You are very much into the old turn. And to my taste slightly in the wrong direction. Too much forwards. You also have no angulation and you are not reaching down hill. You are leaning a lot into the previous turn, your skis are totally straight, no bend, with their tips out of the snow. Its a hard edge set. Almost like a hockey stop. You are not shaping the turn. You are raicing your arm way too early for the pole plant. Still inclined. Then when you plant your pole its at the exact same time you hit the new edges. Maybe you are having to fight your skis too much. Looks that way.

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

Well this picture was actually taken 3 years ago at Alta.  It's on a blue run so it's not very steep, it was snowing so it was fresh cover.

 

michaelA:

1 & 2- Don't remember since it was 3 years ago as I said.  I don't necessarily ski with a certain turn radius in mind on a run like this since it's very easy for me.  I ski something like this just very naturally without thinking about that kind of thing, turning as I please.  These were definitely longer carved turns though

3.  In regards to transition, while I can't be positive, by looking at it and knowing my style I'm probably in the middle of my turn but probably towards the end of the middle, if you know what I mean

7.  I want to say I planned on transitioning smoothly on this particular slope and turn.

 

Majortato:

1.  Definitely trying to make a carved turn as it was not a steep trail where I would need to scrub speed or anything like that.

2.  The reason there is no trails behind me are 1 because this isn't a very good camera and 2 like I said it was snowing so that may have something to do with that.

 

TDK6:

When you wrote "phat skis," are you referring to the waist of my skis being fat?  These were not necessarily fat skis however the tails and tips were decently wide.  I'm not sure what you mean by aft position, could you explain what that means?  When you say I have no angulation could you explain what that is, what you're looking at in the picture that tells you that and what I should do to fix that?

 

Keep it coming with what you see guys I really appreciate it!  If you could also include how to fix what you see, that'd be very helpful and appreciated.  Thanks again!

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Here's another picture of me skiing from that same trip.  Different run, pretty sure it's the same day.

 

Utah3

post #8 of 11

From two pics, I'd say....  

 

Pole swing far too early and far too aggressive.  The body should follow the pole swing into the turn and onto the new edges.  The pole swing should be a subtle tap and touch, not the stab and jab I see in your pics.  

 

Body position is under angulated.  This shows from the inside hand being low and back.  The outcome is too much weight on the inside ski.  You could also flex the inside leg at the knee more to move more pressure onto the outside ski.

 

Things I like....

 

In the first pic I see an decent amount of "anticipation" (upper/lower body separation with the upper body facing the direction of the new turn).  I would be better if the hips were also anticipated and would help with the alignment issues I see in your upper body.  Hands, shoulders, and angulation would all improve with this.

 

You are looking in the direction of the turn.  This is so important and many people are looking down or where ever else.  You tend to go where you are looking.

post #9 of 11

Looks like you're sliding rather than carving.  Even on soft snow you should in some sense carve a turn that follows the natural course of the weighted ski, rather than fight it and skid.  Also I agree you're leaning back slightly.  And the hand getting ready to plant is too high, while the hand that just planted may be too far behind you.  I think a lot of skiers were taught or learned this style: 1) out west more than east, and 2) back in the 70's/80's.  Eastern ice and racing do not reward this technique.

 

But if it works and it's fun, does it really matter?  (Maybe the fired up expression is the most important clue in the pic!)


Edited by hirustler - 1/3/11 at 7:00pm
post #10 of 11

Hi MCL116,

 

First thing, get your hips up over the middle of your feet and your shoulders slightly ahead of that. Start with that and get back to us.

post #11 of 11

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcl116 View Post

TDK6:

When you wrote "phat skis," are you referring to the waist of my skis being fat?  These were not necessarily fat skis however the tails and tips were decently wide.  I'm not sure what you mean by aft position, could you explain what that means?  When you say I have no angulation could you explain what that is, what you're looking at in the picture that tells you that and what I should do to fix that?

 

Keep it coming with what you see guys I really appreciate it!  If you could also include how to fix what you see, that'd be very helpful and appreciated.  Thanks again!


To me it looks like you are raising your outside arm to make a pole plant very early and then you wait for the actual pole plant. The pole plant you then make quite late when you are already turning. You are very inclined and still in the old turn but your arm is already up in the air. If I was going to give you lessons I would start out with wedging and trying to make you angulate and balance over your outside ski. That is your biggest issue. You need to bend your upper body more forward and get some more ancle flex going on. More forward lean overall. That in combination with angulation (side ways bend at the hip) and outside ski pressure will boost your skiing big time. And remember to wait for that pole plant and then make it quite quickly and with great determination. As an indication that you are going to turn. Not a indication that you might/might not turn. 

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