EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Bindings on Powder Skis
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bindings on Powder Skis

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I am new to powder skis. Would a Marker race binding, with wide breaks of course, work fine on a powder ski? Or is that not recommended?

 

Thanks

post #2 of 11

It would be fine.

post #3 of 11

If the brakes work... no problem.  But one way to think about it is...  If you bought a new car, would you put on used tires?

post #4 of 11

Agreed; they will work fine but if you do go with a new set on fat skis you want to be as low as possible on the ski (i.e. low stand height), ideally with a wide footprint binding.  The Marker Griffon and Jestor (there are others) check both those boxes.  

post #5 of 11

I shoot for a short footprint binding on my powder skis.  I just mounted my new powder boards with Look Pivots because they inhibit the flex of the middle of the ski less than any other top line bindings.  I cannot see the wisdom of buying a powder ski with a sweet "big smile" flex and then mounting a long binding that blocks it for the middle half of the ski.  The Look Pivots have a footprint that is about 4" shorter than the Atomic race bindings on my other skis, and also allows the ski to flex under my boot.  Soft snow, continuous soft flex is my preference.

 

I agree with SquawBrat that a low binding mount is preferable for a powder ski, although a higher mount will make it easier to get the ski on edge on the groomed going back to the lift.  On the other hand, mounting the Markers would probably work just fine.

post #6 of 11

just do it. the old tire and new car analogy is crap. Tires affect performance particuallry used tires. Not so much with bindings, an older binding would cause what exactly? Nothing but aesthetics and perhaps a premature release but that is highly unlikely.

post #7 of 11

what is your motivation for using the markers? If you have them around and want to use them, fine. I wouldn't go to a shop and seek them out for purchase. A race binding is usually super heavy for things that racing requires, big springs, riser plates, etc, which could be an issue if you prefer lighter gear.  I am in agreement with Mudfoot on the technical issues. I have Looks on two pair of  powder skis, and all my skis for that matter. Another thing I like about Looks is that they don't have to snap in automatically. you can pull them on with the heel piece which will sometimes clear just enough powder that you don't have to stand there for 5 minutes cleaning your boots perfectly after a bootpack or fall (though I can't officially encourage that, clean your boot souls, haha).

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

my motivation for using the marker binding is to save money!

post #9 of 11

If these are truly skis for deep days you really want a binding that you can put on without requiring a stable platform of snow to stand on or the need to stand up at all.  The Markers you are considering cannot be put on without these things.  Go with a binding that can be put on by simply pulling up on the heel piece (Tyrolia, Look/Rossi, Marker Royals).

post #10 of 11

It still amazes me that people want to put that Look Pivot binding on a fat ski....  If you could go out and

ski that same ski with the Look/Rossi on one foot and a Jester on the other foot you would be amazed

at how much better the Jester makes that ski.  It really doesn't have a lot to do with the footprint of

the binding (the look/rossi actually has a wider mounting position) but the fact that there is only one

pivot point on the toe piece of the look/rossi bindings and it's located right in the middle of the ski

which on fat skis can be a long long way from the edge.  You roll that ski up on edge and there is a

ton of torsional play in that design especially on fat skis because you're creating so much more leverage

on that pivot with a fat ski.  The pivot points of the new Marker design are located way closer to the

edge of the ski and there is just more material closer to the edge than on any other binding (AFD, toe

wings, etc).

 

Plus who really cares about the length of the footprint of the binding when you're mounting it on flat under foot or

rockered skis.  The skis are already in a flexed state anyways, the bindings aren't inhibiting anything.

That whole argument had some merit when skis were cambered but now with so few fat skis having

camber there is really no validity to it.

post #11 of 11


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wasatchback View Post

It still amazes me that people want to put that Look Pivot binding on a fat ski....  If you could go out and

ski that same ski with the Look/Rossi on one foot and a Jester on the other foot you would be amazed

at how much better the Jester makes that ski.  It really doesn't have a lot to do with the footprint of

the binding (the look/rossi actually has a wider mounting position) but the fact that there is only one

pivot point on the toe piece of the look/rossi bindings and it's located right in the middle of the ski

which on fat skis can be a long long way from the edge.  You roll that ski up on edge and there is a

ton of torsional play in that design especially on fat skis because you're creating so much more leverage

on that pivot with a fat ski.  The pivot points of the new Marker design are located way closer to the

edge of the ski and there is just more material closer to the edge than on any other binding (AFD, toe

wings, etc).

 

Plus who really cares about the length of the footprint of the binding when you're mounting it on flat under foot or

rockered skis.  The skis are already in a flexed state anyways, the bindings aren't inhibiting anything.

That whole argument had some merit when skis were cambered but now with so few fat skis having

camber there is really no validity to it.



Thanks for the laughs.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Bindings on Powder Skis