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Terrifying Ski Experience

post #1 of 61
Thread Starter 

Growing up, I skied in various resorts in CO and NM, skiing in the trees or steep bumps. In the last 5 years living in the UK, I've been skiing in the Alps, going off piste whenever I can find good snow.

 

Two days ago, I had my most terrifying experience on skis. My friend talked me into skiing a couple of hours on an indoor slope not far from here, at 7:00 in the evening (when the place was packed with working stiffs and park rats at the same time).

 

On top of that, the beginner side was reserved for those taking lessons, which meant everyone else was packed on the normal side, and by "everyone" I mean all those people who don't really know what they're doing but won't spring for lessons. The slope was the equivalent of a good red in Europe or steep blue in the US, and by that time in the evening, it had developed a number of significant bumps and icy patches.

 

Honestly, I've never seen so many out-of-control skiers and boarders packed in such a confined space; it was actually frightening. I've skied in trees and amongst boulders and cliffs, but I've never been so concerned for my safety as I was on that indoor slope. I was afraid to stop at the bottom because I was certain someone would come crashing into me.

 

If you want to scare an extreme skier, stick him on a crowded indoor slope full of out-of-control people and watch him p*ss his pants.

post #2 of 61

I've never skied indoors, but I have the same reaction when entering the groomed runs at Mt. Baker after spending the day skiing off the groomers.  I feel like I'm being shot at.  Stumps, rocks, cliffs, trees, steep, narrow, ice, crud, are all simple compared to staying alive and uninjured on these crowded blues and greens.

 

I know these slopes are not crowded compared to many other places but if this was all I could ski, I'm pretty sure I would quit the sport.

post #3 of 61

The mountain where I used to teach had a blue slope from the top of the mountain that was constructed as a sort of construction access for heavy equipment when the place was built. It is narrow in places with a nasty switchback that actually requires a fair amount of skill to ski under control in spite of the smoothness and relatively gentle slope. It is easily the most terrifying place to ski on the mountain. Elsewhere on the mountain there are World Cup GS runs and some decent mogul runs but nothing compares to being in this bowling alley of a run while out of control skiers straight line to a crash or a stopping point all around you. It takes skill and attentiveness to avoid being knocked over. I can only imagine the manic terror of the people who basically commit their fate to providence when they zoom this run lacking skills to control their speed or trajectory. They often seem to be enjoying themselves. It is their potential victims who seem to be most uncomfortable.

post #4 of 61

For the same experience just go to Hunter Mtn on any given Sat. or Sun. I'm sure it will be even worse now that they replaced the main Quad with a six pack.

 

After skiing there one Sat. with a friend a few years back I turned & said to him while walking off the mountain "I feel lucky to be walking off this mtn. in one piece."

post #5 of 61

Natural or fixed objects are avoidable but errant moving people are not as predictable.  I started skiing the trees early in my sport. I look forward to unfavorable conditions off piste. It culls out most interlopers. Even technology has it's limits. I don't think I would even be interested in skiing indoors.

post #6 of 61

Corkscrew at Alta= unguided missle funnel, otherwise known as "Alta bowling"

post #7 of 61

^^^^^

 

I've been skiing Alta since the late 80's. I've never skied Corkscrew. Never even considered it.

post #8 of 61

At Mt. Baker the two most used chairlifts load in the same area.  People change hills constantly and when they do the traffic of these folks crosses at right angles on an open slope.  Some of them are trying to keep enough speed so that they don't have to walk uphill to their loading zone and others are just moving fast for the heck of it.  It is the scariest spot in the ski area.  I've never seen anything like it anywhere else.  It's really dangerous.

post #9 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post

^^^^^

 

I've been skiing Alta since the late 80's. I've never skied Corkscrew. Never even considered it.



Jer I loled hard. thanks dude

post #10 of 61

I keep saying that everyone should experiance Blue Mountain Ontario on a saturday just once. No word of a lie I dont care what hill your on atb this resort on a weekend you have no more then 50 open ft around you max, Its crazy. 25thousand uphill skier capacity on a 750 vertical foot hill. The lines are ALWAYS a minimum of 45 minutes ( im being easy on the time)

I cant even ski on the weekends at this hill . You spend the whole time trying to avoid people and plan your route.

If your ever in Ontario in the winter check it out one time it is the highest uphill capacity in North America on only 750 ft.

post #11 of 61

Skied Tahoe for over 20 years and never skied on a weekend and never ever on a Holiday.  Put the skis away for 2 weeks during Christmas vacation which is a ZOO.  Moved to Idaho 8 years ago and ski whenever I want, the groomers are almost never crowded and off piste is almost always just like skiing alone or just with your partner.  Guess I am lucky.

 

If I had to ski in these described places I'd probably move to ................................

post #12 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boot View Post

I keep saying that everyone should experiance Blue Mountain Ontario on a saturday just once. No word of a lie I dont care what hill your on atb this resort on a weekend you have no more then 50 open ft around you max, Its crazy. 25thousand uphill skier capacity on a 750 vertical foot hill. The lines are ALWAYS a minimum of 45 minutes ( im being easy on the time)

I cant even ski on the weekends at this hill . You spend the whole time trying to avoid people and plan your route.

If your ever in Ontario in the winter check it out one time it is the highest uphill capacity in North America on only 750 ft.



I can vouch for this too, though 45 minute wait times seem a bit overstated... maybe 15-20 minutes is more typical... all for a 700ft run.

 

When I lived 50 minutes from there and had a pass, I remember showing up one day several days after Christmas, seeing the parking lot and turning around to go home.  There were literally 15-20X the cars I was used to seeing mid-week.

 

You'll never see more first timers crowded into so little space as here.  As well, there are so many coming from the immigrant rich Greater Toronto Area where people are not only new to skiing, but new to snow too.

 

The thing is, during the week this is a very good resort (relatively).  All high speed lifts with no lines, and practically beginner free (the locals ski very well).  You can rack up a lot of vert on some Georgian Bay lake effect supplemented by the best snowmaking system money can buy.

 

post #13 of 61

God what a bunch of whiners :) All you people are skilled enough you wouldn't have trouble skiing a rockslide and stopping on a dime, yet out of control beginners (who know the true meaning of terror) are a problem ?! I guess the grass is always greener (and maybe blue and black) on the other side.

post #14 of 61

(double post)

post #15 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Defcon View Post

God what a bunch of whiners :) All you people are skilled enough you wouldn't have trouble skiing a rockslide and stopping on a dime, yet out of control beginners (who know the true meaning of terror) are a problem ?! I guess the grass is always greener (and maybe blue and black) on the other side.



Actually, it's not the true beginners who scare me. I know they don't want to be going fast, and they're trying to stop. They usually fall over before they can develop enough speed to do any real damage to anyone.

 

The ones who scare me are those who are only just a bit beyond a true beginner, but they think they're better. They're the ones going much faster than they should be in areas where control is vital. You've all seen the guys I'm talking about: arms out with elbows pointing down, feet far apart but both skis pointing straight, absorbing bumps by bending at the waist rather than the knees, straightlining over bumps rather than making controlled turns. Those are the guys who cause real damage. They're the reason I almost never ski in the middle of a groomed trail.

 

At one point the other night, I felt it would probably be safer to slalom between the people riding up the drag lift rather than ski the middle of the slope. At least on the lift, the other people were riding a predictable line at a controlled speed.

post #16 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boot View Post

I keep saying that everyone should experiance Blue Mountain Ontario on a saturday just once. No word of a lie I dont care what hill your on atb this resort on a weekend you have no more then 50 open ft around you max, Its crazy. 25thousand uphill skier capacity on a 750 vertical foot hill. The lines are ALWAYS a minimum of 45 minutes ( im being easy on the time)

I cant even ski on the weekends at this hill . You spend the whole time trying to avoid people and plan your route.

If your ever in Ontario in the winter check it out one time it is the highest uphill capacity in North America on only 750 ft.



50 open feet is plenty of room to avoid and gives more than enough time to react.  I used to ski Blue Mountain Collingwood a lot, mostly on weekends.  I find the north side (with the steeper runs) has fewer skiers.  Sometimes L- hill is deserted because all the beginners are on hills south of there and all the "experts" are on the north side.  My secret to not getting run into by an out of control boarder or skier on BMC is just ski faster; nobody can run into you from behind if you are the fastest skier on the hill biggrin.gif, of course you have to be able to control where you skis go so you don't hit them, which is doable on good skis, on floppy rentals....not so much.  The scary thing is that most of the out of control skiers are using floppy rentals; they couldn't make the required zigs and zags even if they new what they were doing.  

post #17 of 61

The ski out at sunshine village is crazy at the end of the day. 

post #18 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

The ski out at sunshine village is crazy at the end of the day. 



I'd hardly call that terrifying!.....  The lodge at lunch during holiday week however..... 

post #19 of 61

Man, this reminds me of why I ski Magic all the time...  People like to talk trash about the fixed grip double, but the truth is that it keeps onhill traffic to an absolute minimum.  Most of the time you have the trail to yourself, depending on the trail count.  Silence is most definitely golden!   

 

But I feel the pain.  I've been hit several times by out of control skiers at Stratton and Okemo, and the part that really pisses you off is that the gaper always blames YOU for being in that spot when they're trying to flail out of control there.  Only once have I gotten an apology after someone hit me, but usually it's "DOOD, WTF!?"   

 

This year I went with a neon color scheme...  If those stupid gapers see ONE PERSON on that trail, it will be me.     

post #20 of 61

Try skiing Conifer at Wachusett on a Saturday afternoon when that's the only trail open on that side of the mountain. Terrifying.

post #21 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

The ski out at sunshine village is crazy at the end of the day. 



Your skiing is only crowded when you are a sheep and do the same as others.   Back when I skied Squaw a lot, our group would go up to the top of Siberia and sit in the snow, have a beer and wait till after 4PM when the ski patrol would kick us off the hill.   Then we'd ski down to the parking lot, non stop and never have a crowd in front of us.  Well maybe at the bar.

post #22 of 61

Can't speak for indoor hills, but this is why spring skiing is usually the best time to ski North America.  Most folks are polishing up their golf clubs leaving the best snow to those/us few that love it most.

post #23 of 61

I think almost any place between Christmas and New Years will be too crowded.  I went to Holiday Valley last night figuring that the last night of vacation it should be quiet, boy was I wrong.  Only skied for a few hours because conditions weren't that good.  They had a lot of rain this past saturday which did quite a bit of damage.

post #24 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boot View Post

I keep saying that everyone should experiance Blue Mountain Ontario on a saturday just once. No word of a lie I dont care what hill your on atb this resort on a weekend you have no more then 50 open ft around you max, Its crazy. 25thousand uphill skier capacity on a 750 vertical foot hill. The lines are ALWAYS a minimum of 45 minutes ( im being easy on the time)

I cant even ski on the weekends at this hill . You spend the whole time trying to avoid people and plan your route.

If your ever in Ontario in the winter check it out one time it is the highest uphill capacity in North America on only 750 ft.



50 open feet is plenty of room to avoid and gives more than enough time to react.  I used to ski Blue Mountain Collingwood a lot, mostly on weekends.  I find the north side (with the steeper runs) has fewer skiers.  Sometimes L- hill is deserted because all the beginners are on hills south of there and all the "experts" are on the north side.  My secret to not getting run into by an out of control boarder or skier on BMC is just ski faster; nobody can run into you from behind if you are the fastest skier on the hill biggrin.gif, of course you have to be able to control where you skis go so you don't hit them, which is doable on good skis, on floppy rentals....not so much.  The scary thing is that most of the out of control skiers are using floppy rentals; they couldn't make the required zigs and zags even if they new what they were doing.  



North face is a great spot to ski.

Unfortunatly when we teach it aint on that side hahahaha

I kindda miss Blue.Week day cheap passes for the locale the 5x7 cost next to noting ,and really thats the time to ski Blue.

post #25 of 61


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post

Growing up, I skied in various resorts in CO and NM, skiing in the trees or steep bumps. In the last 5 years living in the UK, I've been skiing in the Alps, going off piste whenever I can find good snow.

 

Two days ago, I had my most terrifying experience on skis. My friend talked me into skiing a couple of hours on an indoor slope not far from here, at 7:00 in the evening (when the place was packed with working stiffs and park rats at the same time).

 

On top of that, the beginner side was reserved for those taking lessons, which meant everyone else was packed on the normal side, and by "everyone" I mean all those people who don't really know what they're doing but won't spring for lessons. The slope was the equivalent of a good red in Europe or steep blue in the US, and by that time in the evening, it had developed a number of significant bumps and icy patches.

 

Honestly, I've never seen so many out-of-control skiers and boarders packed in such a confined space; it was actually frightening. I've skied in trees and amongst boulders and cliffs, but I've never been so concerned for my safety as I was on that indoor slope. I was afraid to stop at the bottom because I was certain someone would come crashing into me.

 

If you want to scare an extreme skier, stick him on a crowded indoor slope full of out-of-control people and watch him p*ss his pants.


Women and children are running from murderous militants in the Congo and Ivory Coast.  Mugabe's police in Zimbabwe are terrorizing all those opposed to his regime.  People are getting hacked to pieces with machetes in the Sudan.  Somali citizens can't leave their homes for fear of being shot by warlords and thugs.  But you were terrified at an indoor ski area.  You yuppies crack me up.  Can you say "out of touch"?

post #26 of 61

Last year I got body checked into the tree's because some punk decided to do a 360 off the side of the run and totally FAILED at it.  Most of the sides of the ski out is not ski-able and quite dangerous.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramzee View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

The ski out at sunshine village is crazy at the end of the day. 



I'd hardly call that terrifying!.....  The lodge at lunch during holiday week however..... 

post #27 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaos View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post

Growing up, I skied in various resorts in CO and NM, skiing in the trees or steep bumps. In the last 5 years living in the UK, I've been skiing in the Alps, going off piste whenever I can find good snow.

 

Two days ago, I had my most terrifying experience on skis. My friend talked me into skiing a couple of hours on an indoor slope not far from here, at 7:00 in the evening (when the place was packed with working stiffs and park rats at the same time).

 

On top of that, the beginner side was reserved for those taking lessons, which meant everyone else was packed on the normal side, and by "everyone" I mean all those people who don't really know what they're doing but won't spring for lessons. The slope was the equivalent of a good red in Europe or steep blue in the US, and by that time in the evening, it had developed a number of significant bumps and icy patches.

 

Honestly, I've never seen so many out-of-control skiers and boarders packed in such a confined space; it was actually frightening. I've skied in trees and amongst boulders and cliffs, but I've never been so concerned for my safety as I was on that indoor slope. I was afraid to stop at the bottom because I was certain someone would come crashing into me.

 

If you want to scare an extreme skier, stick him on a crowded indoor slope full of out-of-control people and watch him p*ss his pants.


Women and children are running from murderous militants in the Congo and Ivory Coast.  Mugabe's police in Zimbabwe are terrorizing all those opposed to his regime.  People are getting hacked to pieces with machetes in the Sudan.  Somali citizens can't leave their homes for fear of being shot by warlords and thugs.  But you were terrified at an indoor ski area.  You yuppies crack me up.  Can you say "out of touch"?


Is all a matter of what your use to!!
 

post #28 of 61

I guess you've never been to Breck during the holiday season.  I'd rather swallow tacks than ride there during hightime, which is almost every weekend.

post #29 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaos View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post

Growing up, I skied in various resorts in CO and NM, skiing in the trees or steep bumps. In the last 5 years living in the UK, I've been skiing in the Alps, going off piste whenever I can find good snow.

 

Two days ago, I had my most terrifying experience on skis. My friend talked me into skiing a couple of hours on an indoor slope not far from here, at 7:00 in the evening (when the place was packed with working stiffs and park rats at the same time).

 

On top of that, the beginner side was reserved for those taking lessons, which meant everyone else was packed on the normal side, and by "everyone" I mean all those people who don't really know what they're doing but won't spring for lessons. The slope was the equivalent of a good red in Europe or steep blue in the US, and by that time in the evening, it had developed a number of significant bumps and icy patches.

 

Honestly, I've never seen so many out-of-control skiers and boarders packed in such a confined space; it was actually frightening. I've skied in trees and amongst boulders and cliffs, but I've never been so concerned for my safety as I was on that indoor slope. I was afraid to stop at the bottom because I was certain someone would come crashing into me.

 

If you want to scare an extreme skier, stick him on a crowded indoor slope full of out-of-control people and watch him p*ss his pants.


Women and children are running from murderous militants in the Congo and Ivory Coast.  Mugabe's police in Zimbabwe are terrorizing all those opposed to his regime.  People are getting hacked to pieces with machetes in the Sudan.  Somali citizens can't leave their homes for fear of being shot by warlords and thugs.  But you were terrified at an indoor ski area.  You yuppies crack me up.  Can you say "out of touch"?



I guess he/she didn't realize this site was called Epic murderous militants in the Congo and Ivory Coast blog.

post #30 of 61

Terrifying?  What do you people know of terrifying.  Try being chased by 50 Maoists through northern Nepal with nothing but a shiv made of p-tex and a shield constructed from bark to protect you.  I ran for 120 miles to the border of Tibet while being shot as with AK 47's. Thankfully when I reached Nepal I met some monks who had heard of me; the great golden phoenix god-man who conquered the peaks of the sky.  They invited me to their high alpine monastery where I took a hot shower and ate some sushi.  And still, after all that..I wasn't terrified. 

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