EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Not just another Quiver thread!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Not just another Quiver thread!!

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

It struck me yesterday after picking up anouther pair of skis that perhaps I am now growing my quiver to deal with different conditions and hills and snow and pitch and......

It wasnt that long ago that I only skied 1 pair of skies, it didnt matter where I was going. ( i might rent some for heli or cat skiing)

I didn't care what the snow conditions are or the pitch or the depth.

I think I use to be a much better all around skier, didn't matter who I was with or what I was skiing I just went had fun and was able to do it and still be enjoyable whith my 1 pair of skies I was on.

I am not sure maybe I now have to compensate for my age , my extra 40 LBS, my lack of conditioning, my less agressive nature as I get older. I know I am not the skier I use to be and I guess I didn,t need to compensate for my short commings.

 

How meny pair do you have and why? Are we all in need of more to do less or have we just never reached the ski abilaty that 1 pair will do???

post #2 of 25

1 pair....cuz that's all I NEED.  At least for now (I see myself adding in the next year or two).

post #3 of 25

 

As you said, some of us may be dealing with issues where a more specialized ski helps at any given time.
I have Nordica Nitrous for firm days where I anticipate skiing more bumps and maybe steeper runs for the first time. They are my shortest and most flexible pair of skis, so are the easiest to ski tough terrain on.
I have Mythic Riders that are 184 and fairly stiff. I like those for more wide open and likely fast skiing as they are much more solid feeling that the Nitrous.
I just bought a pair of 183 Bros and have skied them one day. At 99 underfoot, I thought they would end up being my everyday ski for resort skiing. If I really like them, I will likely sell the MRs, but that will take me many days of skiing to decide which pair I will keep as a daily driver.
I have a pair of 190 Praxis Back Country's that I bought as my powder day ski. At 105 underfoot they work pretty darn well as a resort powder ski. By that I mean they work great in the few untracked runs you get first thing and then keep on going through the cut up conditions really well. The bad news is I am 25 lbs over weight, so I do occasionally sink the tips or find myself in the back seat to keep the tips up so
I just traded my Praxis Powders for a pair of 196 Lhasa Pows for the deeper resort powder days. I haven't used them yet, but from the reviews, I am fairly certain they will work great for me at Mammoth.
I am thinking of buying some Dynafit bindings and compatible boots once gear starts going on sale in Feb/March to put on my Back Country's. Those will be perfect for a side country set up to get me out of the resort for a few more untracked powder days a year.
post #4 of 25
I was always a 1 1/2 pr ski guy. The 1/2 pr being my previous pair kept around as rock skis, which is a good idea skiing in the east. For the last 10 years or so my ski type of choice has been the mid fat all mountain ski, and I used if for everything. That ski for me right now is a Vokl AC30 170cm.

However about 4 years ago I started racing in an adult series and have since added a Volkl Racetiger RC 173cm that I use as my GS race ski and I just bought a pair of Blizzard SLR Race Mag IQ 160cm for my SL race ski. On race weekends I free ski which ever race ski I am using that day for the race. It is interesting noticing the differences of each ski and adapting my skills to take advantage of the different shapes.

In the process I seem to have eliminated the rock ski so I now have 3 skis in my quiver.

Rick G
post #5 of 25

I keep one pair for soft snow conditions and one for hard snow.  Both pair will work OK in both conditions, but each works best in its focus area.  That way I don't have to stress too much about what skis to use on a given day.  We often have widely varied conditions on the same run, so keeping it simple seems a good choice for me.

 

Oh yeah, I also have some rocks. 

post #6 of 25

I have lots, but don't spend lots.th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

I have the "good"  SLs, GS, Powder, All Mountain/Twins,  and Bump Skis.. by "good" I mean very good shape to almost brand new, but acquired for under $250/paiir including bindings.

Then, I have the "rock ski" GS, Powder, and Midfats that I would take if it is likely that cover is thin in spots.

 

Then, I have the really old retro stuff I just can't seem to toss out  All adds up to about a dozen pairs of "ski-able" skis.

post #7 of 25

Hi, I'm Vet and I'm a skier. You should join our branch of Skiers Anonymous. We have swap meets rolleyes.gif

 

post #8 of 25

I have different quivers in different places.

 

Whistler has Sultan 85's, Mythic Riders and ObSETHed's.

 

SLC has MR's and ObSETHed's

 

Least Coast has Dynastar Skicross 10's and 8000's.

 

All depends on what the conditions are. At Whistler you never know, in SLC often it's deep and soft so worst case MR's, better case, ObSETHed's, least coast - doesn't really matter (yes, yes, I know some who claim to ski pow every day!rolleyes.gif).

 

Always noce to have something on hand to decide what today should be.

post #9 of 25

What I have for a quiver is a daily driver, 97mm, a powder ski, 115mm, and a firm conditions ski, 75mm. Lots of rock skis, cause you never sell your old skis if you liked them to begin with.

I have lucked into some good deals, but that is irrelevant. If you buy exactly what you need for the exact conditions you encounter, you shouldn't need 6 pairs that kinda' work in their niche.

 

OP, I am skiing better now than I did as a young man (with one ski for all conditions, which worked fine then), or even 10 - 15 years ago, due largely to living in the mountains. There must be some day when age starts to take things down a notch, and I don't look forward to that day and pledge to myself to resist it.

post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 

OK

When I started this thread I though Id stir up a bit of a hornets nest with my approach ( heck no crap disturber me?? )

Now that youve all started answearing in such a realistic way now my thinking is changing hahaha.

I have my Fisher RC4s very narrow underfoot ,very aggresive ski great for ice and hard pack on those days you want to fly.( also an extreamly demanding ski)

My "Old man" Salomon Xwing 8 , soft forgiving but still ok on the hard pack, just not as good at high speed.( really like these)

 Head Monster M77 until now my widest ski and truthfully im not overly fond of them but keep giving them a chance to change my thinking.

Now the ones Ive ordered will now be my powder skis. I think I bought two tobbogans with bindings on them Ninthward Rory Silva twin tips 111 underfoot

So I am chatting with LS on line about what skis I should take , obviously I bought the new ones just for this trip so thats one pair. The second pair though I cant for the life of me figgure out what other 1 I want with me.

Castle Mountain in Alberta Canada. 30ft fresh a year no grooming on large hill. smaller hill has groomed runs.( skicastle.ca )

 

So now Im gunna ask what you think ???

Whats the second pair to go with me?

 

 

And yes eastskier44 yours was the right answear hahaha

post #11 of 25

I can't say that any of your 4 or 5 suppositions about skis, ability, or aging make a bit of sense. Quiver analysis is no longer a topic of controversy, or interest either. Your observations seem to be at an elementary level and your commitment to a lifetime of skiing seems to be drifting into a blah zone. Very interestingrolleyes.gif

post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I can't say that any of your 4 or 5 suppositions about skis, ability, or aging make a bit of sense. Quiver analysis is no longer a topic of controversy, or interest either. Your observations seem to be at an elementary level and your commitment to a lifetime of skiing seems to be drifting into a blah zone. Very interestingrolleyes.gif


THANK YOU!!!
 

post #13 of 25

Why two pairs? You are going where you expect soft snow and you don't like the Heads. Would the Xwings offer anything substantially better than the Ninthwards? Race skis on soft snow? Nah. Take the twin tips and demo if you need a change of pace or conditions fail to be soft.

post #14 of 25

There's a tiny bit of grooming on the big hill (at least one run and a cat track) rest up top is just open terrain, bowls, trees, chutes... there's no snow making anywhere ).  Mt. Haig (the lower mountain) is 1100 verticle of intermediate pitched groomers and then some pretty gentle glade runs also off the groomers.  The runs groomed first will have what ever snow fell over night on top of the groomers (so often 6 to 8 inches fresh on top of the grooming).  We can just hope we get lots of snow on your weekend.   It was quite icy and hard for a few days before Christmas day after a dry spell and I did have my Monsters on even up top for 2 days at Christmas.  Then it snowed steady for the past few days, with a couple more feet and i've been teaching in my powder skis again.  If you want two skis bring your favorite old man ski, you can use it on any groomer and you really won't want any of your old skis up top, your new ones will be fine there.  Having your favorite old man ski along will let you just got take it easy and be lazy when I'm teaching.  Buy a helmet, the rocks up top hurt.

post #15 of 25

I'd bring that 85 waist ski you haven't bought ... Yetdevil.gif

 

Can't your wife's friends and bosses up there hook you up with demos and stuff?th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #16 of 25

Let's see... 

 

180 Moment Tahoes (96 underfoot)  everyday skis- bumps, slush, chopped pow, etc.

183 PM Gear BROs (100 underfoot)  touring or groomer ransacking

183 PM Gear carbon FAT BROs (110 underfoot)  touring or fresh snow skis

176 ON3P Billy Goats (112 underfoot) tight woods/cliff hucking skis on fresh days

 

 

I love my indies!  Now I just want a pair of Mowglis for bumpin' and a set of Dynafit FT12s for my BROs and I'll be all set! 

 

 

post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I can't say that any of your 4 or 5 suppositions about skis, ability, or aging make a bit of sense. Quiver analysis is no longer a topic of controversy, or interest either. Your observations seem to be at an elementary level and your commitment to a lifetime of skiing seems to be drifting into a blah zone. Very interestingrolleyes.gif



 

post #18 of 25

It's not that we need crutches as we get older, it's that we are less willing to put up with inadequacies.

 

As a young man, Canadian Club was good enough.  Now I want Lagavulin.

 

The Quiver:

The first brand new ski I bought was a Dynastar GS ski, a modern wood fibre-glass ski with built in edges. It was a step up from those too long wooden skis with screw-on edges and cable bindings (or no edges and bear trap bindings).  I still keep it around for nostalgia.  I quickly found that the ski was too short to be stable at speed and switched to longer and longer GS skis, until SG skis came along. 

 

I still have an SG ski, which I keep in the quiver not just for nostalgia, but because it really does feel good at insane speeds.  It's a little floppier than it used to be, sometimes rebounding with an extra flop from the tips after landing big air at speed, but nothing worrying (the worry is keeping them under me when the hit comes cause the landing is too flat).

 

When I first got those SG skis I was quite willing to use them everywhere.  So they weren't the greatest in bumps, I could bull my way through them.  So they were too stiff for powder, I didn't really have to turn sharp or even all that much.  However that's where it started.  I had to admit that the softer Dynastar GS skis of the day (in whatever the longest length I could find was) were easier to bend into a turn in deep snow and that stability wasn't that much of an issue with all that soft snow under foot (except for the steeper pitches that didn't hold snow, but a little more excitement was welcome to a young man, so long as no turns were involved).  I actually rented GS skis when I owned perfectly good SG skis.

 

Then being stuck in the land of small hills, I had to admit that a short radius ski would make more sense.  Enter the WC SC.

 

They could handle any speed the local hills could generate, but a day on the old SGs just for giggles, reminded how nice it is to arc a pure smooth LR turn.  So I kept an eye open for a Longer radius ski.

 

Found the Machete G on sale, and it had a longer radius.  Turns out it didn't have the ice-grip I wanted, but it sure is nice for deeper snow.  It's fine on hardpack too, if you resign yourself to sliding across the ice patches and turning once you get to the other side of them, just not fine when it's all ice.

 

Got the P50 F1s.  I like the radius, and I figure if I change the tuning to 0.5:3, I can get the ice grip I want.  However I'm intrigued about keeping the factory tune and expanding my repertoire into speed-control skidded turns, and keeping the factory tune's 1:2  forgiving nature for moguls.

 

Active Quiver 4 Skis for 4 purposes: 165 cm WC SC short radius (13 m) , 188 cm Völkl P50 F1 medium radius (22 ish m) for higher speeds and Kästle SG Long radius (60 -70? m) skis for much higher speeds on hardpack.  Only Volant Machete G medium radius (22 ish m)  skis for deep, but I hardly ever see deep.

 

I'm sure if I lived out west I would have more and wider skis.  If I was really into bumps I would likely want bump specific skis too, but the other skis (except for the SGs) work "well enough" for me there.


Edited by Ghost - 1/3/11 at 3:09pm
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I'd bring that 85 waist ski you haven't bought ... Yetdevil.gif

 

Can't your wife's friends and bosses up there hook you up with demos and stuff?th_dunno-1[1].gif


Its a ski hill sure they can hook me up.... for a price LOL

I think MR makes sense though.


 

post #20 of 25

I used only one pair for over ten years, 60mm waisted carvers. Before that I used narrow skis. I'm older now and have switched to 70mm waist to compensate for my declining ability. I have a pair of 80mm waisted fatty cheater skis that I'll mount up when I'm too decrepit to rock my midfats.

post #21 of 25

I've got four different pairs of skis, but I've got 6 pairs of skis.

 

25-30 years ago a GS racing ski and a powder ski were the exact same thing. Now you put a GS ski next to a powder ski and they are the complete opposite. Back then I skied one pair because that's really all that was available.

post #22 of 25

174cm Blizzard 8.7s - hard to soft snow groomers, instructor things, everyday mostly on trail ski

177cm Blizzard "the ones" - off piste everyday ski, touring

183cm Volkl Katana - powder/deep slush

183cm Dynastar WC GS - gs turns on hard snow/racing

192cm Atomic Thug - rock powder skis

 

 

skis wanted for no real reasons.

 

177cm Blizzard "the origin" - need a cambered twin if I can swap binding with my other blizzards that would be awesome

191cm Blizzard "the answer" - was hopelessly let down by my short skis last year at snowbird, out west I need longer skis, than what I have.

183cm Atomic Bentchentler - want a more playfull powder ski than the katana.

 

 

 

post #23 of 25

Hard snow carver - 175cm - 70mm

All mountain traditional - 183cm - 79mm

Mid-fat, twin tip, flyaway, resort ski (and local "pow") - 187cm - 96mm

All mountain rock ski - 176cm - 76mm

 

Heck, when I put it like that it seems well thought out, which is not quite the case.

 

Three is enough.  Anything else would have to either be a superb bargain, or replace one of the above.  But constantly on the lookout.

post #24 of 25

OKay my quiver....

 

Constact ST 2006 (slalom race ski, 60 something 12 meter radius) -  158 every day eastern groomer, ice ski, love them in bumps also ,they're so short, turn so fast, make a great short turn

 

Dream Thang (IM 77) - 163 16 metre radius eastern powder ski (lol yea we don't get much in North Carolina).

 

Johnny 94  -  173, 19 metre radius, western all mountain, piste, off piste, powder, do it all ski.  Love them, teaching in them most days, switch to the Dream thang when snow gets scares and turns to wind pack.

 

Ninthward Rory Silva Twin Tip Powder Skis - 171 , 105 underfoot 25.5 meter radius ( the one i'm going to sneak out of old boots ski bag when he comes to ski with me in January and use as a true big dump powder ski out here)

 

 

Once I sneak Old boots out of his ski bag I think i'm all set for now, I'll re evaluate my quiver next year.

post #25 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lady_Salina View Post

OKay my quiver....

 

Constact ST 2006 (slalom race ski, 60 something 12 meter radius) -  158 every day eastern groomer, ice ski, love them in bumps also ,they're so short, turn so fast, make a great short turn

 

Dream Thang (IM 77) - 163 16 metre radius eastern powder ski (lol yea we don't get much in North Carolina).

 

Johnny 94  -  173, 19 metre radius, western all mountain, piste, off piste, powder, do it all ski.  Love them, teaching in them most days, switch to the Dream thang when snow gets scares and turns to wind pack.

 

Ninthward Rory Silva Twin Tip Powder Skis - 171 , 105 underfoot 25.5 meter radius ( the one i'm going to sneak out of old boots ski bag when he comes to ski with me in January and use as a true big dump powder ski out here)

 

 

Once I sneak Old boots out of his ski bag I think i'm all set for now, I'll re evaluate my quiver next year.


Man a full week of hard skiing has really made me alot stronger.... this bag seemed way heavier on the way here


 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Not just another Quiver thread!!