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Keeping a running water supply going during the day, while in the backcountry

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

I'm wondering if anyone  has come up with a simple effective way to carry and refill your daily water supply as  you  go. I'm not talking about what  you might do when you stop at night or what  have you. More what you do to keep a running water supply going, w/o having  to say fill up a 70 liter bladder or whopping bottle at the start of the day and  lug it around.

 

That sort of thing seems like such a waste when there's water all around to be had. I've been experimenting with keeping various wide mouthed containers half full of snow, with a bit  of water, on my pack exposed to any sun at all times. If there's no sun  or it's really cold I'll slap a hot hands type of product on the bottle to help melt the snow. 

 

It mostly is working out  okay, the part I'm unhappy with is what container  to  use and how to best fasten it to the pack so it's  not in the way but still exposed to the  sun and easy to grab. The damn naglene containers seem to be made to be  in your way.  I've found some bladder/canteens at REI that seem a bit better but am still fussing with some good way to fasten it to the pack as I desire.

 

Interested in your experiences with this or any ideas.

 

thanks

post #2 of 10


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonjon View Post

Hi,

 

I'm wondering if anyone  has come up with a simple effective way to carry and refill your daily water supply as  you  go. I'm not talking about what  you might do when you stop at night or what  have you. More what you do to keep a running water supply going, w/o having  to say fill up a 70 liter bladder or whopping bottle at the start of the day and  lug it around.

 

 

 

70 litres  eek.gif  Are you just thirsty or runing a steam engine.

 

 

Find running water refill camel back bladder (or other brand), add purification tablet (would hate to get giardia) and head on your way.
 

post #3 of 10

70l...heh.

 

Consider a Jetboil - 1 lb stove = 12l of H2O

 

But mostly I just use an insulated camelback and a pack with an insulated sleeve for the tube.  

post #4 of 10

I don't even use my insulated Camelback any more unless it's so freaking cold I don't really want to be out there anyway.  It was just a PIA to deal with.

 

I use a regular camelback, and after I take a drink I blow the water from the tube back into the reservoir.  Keep the tube stuffed into my coat if it's really cold out.  Haven't had any problems with freezing, knock wood.  One of my ski partners uses a Jet Boil, not so much to refresh his drinking water, more to brew up when we break for lunch.

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

interesting, I feel about  the same about camel backs as far as a pain and I don't want to load up with 70 oz or more oz of water for the day and lug it up  hills when there's ample around  me,  that stuff's heavy ! ;)

 

 a small naglene wide  mouth  container 1/2 water 1/2 snow and shove  it in the side pocket of my pack works

 so so, I need a better solution overall I tend to come back a bit dehydrated.  I think maybe a clear flask or slim bottle that can mount right on the shoulder strap.

 

check this out, i think I'd rather have a flask or something not quite right there but best solution i've seen so far

 

http://www.camp-usa.com/products/packs/bottle-holders-1593.asp

 

1590-TRAIL-PRO-20-10.jpg

post #6 of 10

If you are scooping snow and hoping to melt enough for drinking water you will spend a lot of time for relatively little return.  It takes a fair amount of snow to fill a nalgene type bottle with water.  Furthermore, snow isn't clean what are you doing to purify that snow?  It seems to me that the most efficient option for you would be to carry a lightweight stove and melt snow if you are against carrying water with you

 

Depending upon the area I'm skiing I started the day with a hydration pack and only fill it a bit more than I for the day.  On overnighters I start with the pack full and then melt snow using a stove at camp.  The extra benefit there is that I have warm water! A cup of tea or coffee and I put a bottle in the foot of my sleeping bad and I'm extra warm and I have water to drink during the night if needed.

post #7 of 10

Extra added bonus for hot water in camp - nice toasty warm Nalgene to bring into the sleeping bag with you... mmmmmmmm, best part of winter camping.

 

If you're going to be at a campsite for a few days, and it's sunny out, you can use a black garbage bag to melt snow... load it up with snow and put it out on a rock in the sun, snow will melt if it's sunny/warm enough.  Other than that, skierhj's right, it takes a lot of melted snow to come up with a pot full of water.

 

I got a Camelback with a really wide mouth and it just lives in my pack.  PIA gone.  It's very handy to have a sink hose to fill it with.

post #8 of 10

What I usually do is get a water bottle that is insulated and has a cap that can be used as a cup and fill it with hot water in the morning before you head out with left over water from breakfast. Then when your in the woods fill the cap with snow and then add hot water it almost doubles your daily water supply and gives you warm water that will help warm you up a bit. I don't purify but it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to throw in a tablet before you head out. Just make sure your water bottle is well insulated or else the water will go cold and you wont have enough water for the day.

post #9 of 10

I usually just carry a camelback with me although I haven't done any really long outings.

 

Side note: eating/drinking snow has a couple of inherent problems with it. First like other have said it isn't purified. Second and more importantly drinking really cold water can be dangerous. Since the water is so cold your body has to heat it up in order to be able to digest it. This means you absorb it slower providing less benefit, use more calories to digest it and direct blood flow away from you're limbs as it is directed to your stomach to heat up the water. Most importantly though drinking very cold water lowers your core temp and while you are straining and working hard while climbing/touring you will still likely be digesting that water when you stop and it will continue to lower your core temp especially if you are still drinking it. Just a heads up. I have survival training and one of teh first things they teach you for cold weather survival is do not eat/drink the snow without purifying and warming it.   

post #10 of 10

Having water in a camelback or other resevroir provides a certain water supply with zero effort other than the carrying. Using a camp stove is a great idea but requires time and suitable conditions to set up and melt snow. I'd consider it a backup, not a primary source, for my day's supply. Using solar to create water from snow is a dicey proposition at best. No sun = no water.

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