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GS skis anyone?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I tried searching and couldn't find anything right on point, so here goes:

 

I was looking for skis last year when a friend gave me some old 1080s (6-7yrs old) (181)).  They still work well and I have no problems with them...but, as a gear person, I think I need to build a quiver.biggrin.gif

 

Me: skied from the ages of 6 to 17 or so and started skiing agin last year (I'm 39 now).  I'm about 6'4" 240 w/ gear.  By the end of the season I was carving some decent rails.  The 1080s are working well as an all arounder and I'm just starting to use them in moguls (although I think I'm more into crashing).  I'll keep the 1080s for that purpose and for all around use.  Almost all of my skiing will be done in the Poconos (with a trip or two per yr to NH/VT).

 

Some suggestions when I had no skis were Blizzard 8.1, Sultan 85, and Elan Magfire 82 (thanks Dawg).  Those seem to be the best suggestions for a OSQ, but since I now have the 1080s, would a GS race ski be a good idea?

 

My reasoning:

1) 95% of my skiing will be done on Pocono groomers;

2) I have the 1080s for moguls or if the opportunity for trees ever comes up (the 2x/yr it does);

3) I'm a big guy who grew up racing in the midwest, so I'm not sure the stiffness will be as brutal for me;

 

Lot of people seem fixated on 85(or so) as thier daily ski.  That makes sense to me if it's going to be your only ski, but I always wonder if the 80-90 waist skis are a bit like a printer/fax/copier: does all of those things, just doesn't do any of them as well as specialized.  I just remember as a kid in southern Wisconsin, we always had GS and SL skis because of the ice.

 

Keep in mind, eventually I'd like to round out the quiver with something like the One or Slicer, so I'm thinging a GS ski might be good for where I and what I do...I'd end up with a GS ski, the 1080, and a 100 waist ski.  Or so my thinking goes...

 

OR is this a really bad idea and I'd still be better served with the 8.1 or those Elan 8.2s?

 

Thanks,

Smarty

 

 

post #2 of 10

You're on to something with the race skis, but I would go with a non-FIS slalom ski if I were you.  GS skis are great, if you have the terrain to ski them on.  I'm not sure that a Pocono groomer is generally going to be long enough to really enjoy those things.  Also, GS skis really only do one thing for you, make big turns at speed on the groomers.  A non-FIS slalom will let you make those short radius turns when you please (obviously), but are also very capable of doing the big turns at speed (if you go long enough on the ski, you won't have any trouble with stability at speed.  Lastly, if you're just getting back into skiing, even though you're a big guy, a GS ski might be a little much.  If you're really fixiated on the stability at speed thing, I say go with a medium to long radius frontside carver, maybe even a GS-cheater (like say the CX80's or Stratos).  Other skis I'd look at that will get the job done are Tigersharks, any of the new Heads with the KERS system, Kastle RX, Progressor 10+, and really any high end Blizzi ski.  Hope I'm of help.

 

Tyler 

post #3 of 10

I would agree with you.  I just picked up a pair of Dynastar speed course 64(2002-03)  and man do they fly.  If your mainly on groomers and have the room to open up,  get a race ski. 

 

Royal

post #4 of 10


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by eastskier44 View Post

You're on to something with the race skis, but I would go with a non-FIS slalom ski if I were you.  GS skis are great, if you have the terrain to ski them on.  I'm not sure that a Pocono groomer is generally going to be long enough to really enjoy those things.  Also, GS skis really only do one thing for you, make big turns at speed on the groomers.  A non-FIS slalom will let you make those short radius turns when you please (obviously), but are also very capable of doing the big turns at speed (if you go long enough on the ski, you won't have any trouble with stability at speed.  Lastly, if you're just getting back into skiing, even though you're a big guy, a GS ski might be a little much.  If you're really fixiated on the stability at speed thing, I say go with a medium to long radius frontside carver, maybe even a GS-cheater (like say the CX80's or Stratos).  Other skis I'd look at that will get the job done are Tigersharks, any of the new Heads with the KERS system, Kastle RX, Progressor 10+, and really any high end Blizzi ski.  Hope I'm of help.

 

Tyler 


 

Pocono groomers would be steep enough and long enough to skis GS skis well if its say sno mountain. The deal is Gs skis IMO are really bad idea for general freeskiing on groomers with any people on them.

 

I ski mine quite a bit early morning, but never keep them out when it gets crowded. Quite frankly the prospects of hitting someone at 40 mph just doesnt sound fun, in control doesnt matter when you can see far enough ahead all the time on a crowded groomer.

 

My suggestion is almost GS carvers.

 

Kastle RX

Blizzard supersonic G force Pro

Rossi CX80

 

these are all great picks

post #5 of 10

I have a pair of GS skis that only come out for racing. I wouldn't own a pair if I didn't race. They are meant for big fast gs turns and thats it. I mean if you are looking for a one trick pony than go for it. But otherwise I would consider something else.

post #6 of 10

There is nothing wrong with a "softer" GS ski.  Heck, I recently watched a video of Joey Cordeau skiing bumps on a Stockli GS (not the super heavy FIS model used on the WC, which is only good above one speed...too fast).  Can you easily bend the ski when you pressure it to turn at normal speeds?  If you can, you can carve tighter turns and it should be no trouble.  When the east coast conditions get to a normal icy man-made "snow" and the kids on the 95mm+ waisted skis are sliding all over the place, you will be carving effortlessly on your GS or SL boards.  With fatter skis carving is harder for sure.  With those under-70mm waists I just think about putting the ski on edge and they carve.

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

 

Pocono groomers would be steep enough and long enough to skis GS skis well if its say sno mountain. The deal is Gs skis IMO are really bad idea for general freeskiing on groomers with any people on them.

 

I ski mine quite a bit early morning, but never keep them out when it gets crowded. Quite frankly the prospects of hitting someone at 40 mph just doesnt sound fun, in control doesnt matter when you can see far enough ahead all the time on a crowded groomer.

 

My suggestion is almost GS carvers.

 

Kastle RX

Blizzard supersonic G force Pro

Rossi CX80

 

these are all great picks


^^^^ Quote for truth. Sending a kid who veered into your path to the ER is not anyone's idea of a good day. And real GS skis at recreational speeds are, ah, porcine. You want something that can pull some G's, make some smiles, at subsonic speeds. All of the above are great ideas; if you're a big guy, though, might add a Dynastar 4x4, which are weirdly versatile, can handle major speed, built for heavier guys who know how to ski. 

post #8 of 10

we all skied GS skis in the 70s and 80s because a non-race room GS ski then was somewhat de-tuned and designed to tail slide somewhat. now they are highly specialized carving tools, far less versatile, much more hooked up and not designed to sideslip at all, thus the description of a ski that is designed for 35 to 40 mph

post #9 of 10

A few years ago the FIS changed the GS specs from 21 meter radius (not bad for free skiing) to 27 meter (better for high speed wide open trails)  As a result, some great deals are out there on skis too skinny to be trendy and to turny to race a santioned race on.  These skinny race skis are much less work on ice than a fat ski.  I have three pairs in my collection and use them any time there is some really good ice.

post #10 of 10

I have a pair of Volkl P20 RS supers with lifted MRRs on them.  207cm, race-room stock from 1995.   Looking to go slower now with my 5 year-old.  You can go as fast as you would ever want.  Sit on the down-hill edge and you can blow through any crud. Interested?

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