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Why Use Chair Lift Safety Bars - Page 6

post #151 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegrin View Post




That's all well and good, but common courtesy says you should at least make an effort to confirm that everyone is prepared, and "unannounced" seems a little harsh. A simple pause, visual check, and even a verbal warning should be part of the process.  

 


 

The goal is not to hurt someone who is unprepared.  And, it is understood that out of-province visitors might still be getting used to local customs, so there is room for some leeway, and common courtesy.  Even locals going up for their 287th ride of the season might occasionally need a bit of extra time to get organized on the chair.

 

Basically though, there is an expectation that when you get on the lift, you'll be ready to have the bar brought down right away.  The official announcement is actually the posted lift usage instructions and pictograms.  The common practice is fairly obvious as you see what folks on the chairs ahead of you are doing.

post #152 of 179

Thankfully I have long arms with functioning hands on the ends of them. If for some reason the safety bar is coming down before everyone is ready, I reach up and stop it.

 

I'm glad you weren't seriously hurt. Ski lifts are heavy machinery and deserve your full attention when loading and unloading.

 

Take your backpack off and carry it in your lap.

 

A mistake like reaching for a glove you're dropping could be a mistake you won't get a chance to learn from. Learn from Richie's mistake. Lower the safety bar.

 

A picture of me riding with the safety bar up was posted here. No ones perfect, but there's no good reason to keep it up.

 

Anyone who objects to the bar being lowered is a sociopath.

post #153 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogulmuncher View Post

Basically though, there is an expectation that when you get on the lift, you'll be ready to have the bar brought down right away.  

I guess it boils down to what you mean by "right away," but still, it doesn't ever hurt to give people a head's up, there's only upside by preventing accidents.  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

I'm glad you weren't seriously hurt. Ski lifts are heavy machinery and deserve your full attention when loading and unloading.

 


Don't get me wrong: I was paying attention.  But you only have eyes in one direction (and with a helmet, somewhat reduced peripheral vision at that).  I was watching over my shoulder for the chair and the bar was coming down before I even had my head turned fully forward. As I said, we were still on the platform, I don't think I was taking too much for granted by expecting to actually have my skis leave the ground before the safety bar is down.

post #154 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogulmuncher View Post




 

The goal is not to hurt someone who is unprepared.  And, it is understood that out of-province visitors might still be getting used to local customs, so there is room for some leeway, and common courtesy.  Even locals going up for their 287th ride of the season might occasionally need a bit of extra time to get organized on the chair.

 

Basically though, there is an expectation that when you get on the lift, you'll be ready to have the bar brought down right away.  The official announcement is actually the posted lift usage instructions and pictograms.  The common practice is fairly obvious as you see what folks on the chairs ahead of you are doing.




This. Again, I can only talk for Europe and the Alps, but over here, it's not even a matter of giving a quick warning. Lowering the bar immediately is as natural and self-evident as closing your car door. And I can't think of a single incident in which somebody got hurt because of the bar coming down. If people get their heads smacked, it is usually considered by everybody (including themselves) to be their mistake. ;)

But I agree that a friendly "watch your head" is never a bad idea and that in general people could be more friendly to their fellow skiers.

post #155 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post

Oh, and how is it that so many people in North America struggle to pull the safety bar down without whacking each other, or getting whacked, in the head? Is it really that complicated?

 

In Europe, you can find yourself on a 6-seater in a group speaking 3 or 4 different languages, and without anyone saying a word, they manage to bring the bar down without any problems. All it takes is a quick look around to make sure everyone is ready and then a slow pull so that everyone can get their legs out of the way of the footrests. Unless someone is wearing a big backpack, it's pretty easy to avoid any incidents. Even then, all it takes is a light touch for the person to know to lean back a bit more to get his/her head out of the way.

 

As an American on the right side of the pond, I find all these head-whacking stories a bit embarassing to be honest.

Most people have a pretty good sense of how big their head is. When you add a helmet, your head is now 1-3 inches bigger in every direction, but your internal size meter has already been set for the un-helmeted size. Lots of folks on EpicSki mention getting bonked on their helmets by moving safety bars. I haven't heard of many saying they got bonked by a safety bar on their bare head. I'm wondering if the extra thickness of the helmet is what accounts for most of the head shots by moving safety bars. I don't wear a helmet, and I never get bonked by safety bars. Maybe I'm lucky. Maybe I'm really careful (probably not), or maybe the bar misses my head by less than the thickness of a helmet. I have no way of knowing. I sometimes have to wear a hard hat in my job, and I'm pretty certain nearly everything that I bump my hard hat on would miss my bare head. (Please please please let's not let this degenerate into a helmet thread) In the end, it's often hard to tell which minor bumps on a helmet would hit or miss a bare head though.
 

post #156 of 179

The safety bar is a great tool for streaching the back & doing chin ups for the early morning run.

 

 Years ago while ridding up the chair with a guy who couldnt stop laughing, I asked what was so funny & he told me he rode up with a guy that hung from the bar about 25 - 30 ft up & he said he liked to streach his back out in the morning.

 

I have herd of skiers ( @ fortress mountain which was known for wind) being blown out of the chair with a sudden gust of wind.

 

Lowering the bar to soon might be more dangerous then having it up. After aprox a 3ft dump of snow I loaded the chair lift & the tip of my ski caught the new powder about 20 feet after take off & the back of my ski hit the back of the chairlift. I was ok but it scared me ( I should have been paying attention as well the lifties should have shoveled the snow away from the loading zone.

post #157 of 179
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

around here many of the older fixed lifts have no bars because of the added weight. they would have to remove 1/3 of the chairs if the weight per were increased by safety bars. must have been OK at one time, but people's butts may have evolved into something less safe.roflmao.gif

 

actually, when skiing weekends and holidays there are often guys who sit with their ski tips splayed way out like a beached walrus or something. I lower the bar just to get them back in their own space in the chair.

Those safety bars are heavy.  Maybe they should have left the safety bars off this chair lift. 

 

Wow I am Glad We Put Down The Safety Bar Photo

 

The problem here is clearly the skis are getting wider and heavier.


 

 


Edited by catskills - 4/12/11 at 3:51am
post #158 of 179

- The lift stopped dead.  I was stuck with my high school sweetie so we started to take advantage of the lack of crowd.  Then the wind came up an hour later and the chair started to dance.  I remembered something someone showed me if the chair didn't have a bar and we locked ourselves in with poles across as I clung to the back of the chair to keep us in one place.

 

- A slow lift so who cares?  But it drizzled and froze making a glaze on the seats and then the wind came from behind.

 

Twice in 40 years ... but twice is enough.

 

Oh, if you only ski on bluebird days you will never encounter this stuff.  rolleyes.gif

post #159 of 179

Catskills, that may have been the chair that .. a fat kid thought it was funny to get the chairs in motion and the ocillations got intense till I threatened to kick the dog-snot out of him.

 

Welcome to "Huntah"  as in me an Vinnie and Joweee wen' to Huntah.

 

Long time memories of the Clover Lodge.  Ski on the cheaps at $7.50 a night for a room and breakfast ... as much toast and eggs as you can eat.  smile.gif  You want meat go to a "die-nah".

post #160 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View PostI just love doing that.  I try to whack them in the head too, and if they have a board, I chop it up with my skis as we mess with the tangle of skis, footrests,etc.snowfight.gif

I've also found that a well-placed pole to the face is fun, ideally in the process of lowering the bar. If you do it right you can knock off one of their skis with the footrest while they're distracted.
 

 

post #161 of 179

I have to say I'm really disappointed. Last month, I went on my first North American trip (Revelstoke) since '96/'97, and I didn't see a single person get whacked in the head.

 

The bar came down on every ride, and yet not a single local, seasonaire, or tourist got whacked as far as I could see. I was expecting so much more.

post #162 of 179

here in Ontario we require the use of safety bars. Without it down, the lift will be stopped until you decide to put it down. With these type of laws in effect, no one really thinks about not putting the bar down. It just goes down.
That being said, when I was in whister a few weeks ago its about a 50/50 for bars up or down. So I got in the habit of not putting it down.
I see both sides to the debate.

post #163 of 179


With the sudden wind gust had it not been for the bar on the slick seat I would have been off.  Over a ravine, a 50 or 60 foot fall is not a way to go.

 

Are you going to hear ... "sick" or "awesome dude" .. nah!  rolleyes.gif

 

I mean falling off a lift is stupid and is not a "blaze of glory" or dying with your boots on, it's pretty lame.  popcorn.gif

post #164 of 179
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
....I mean falling off a lift is stupid and is not a "blaze of glory" or dying with your boots on, it's pretty lame.  popcorn.gif
 


Good point.  At the funeral they would say here lies ExtremeSkier.  He could ski steepest hills and huck the biggest cliffs.  To bad he fell off the chair lift after leaving the safety bar up when a large tree fell on the chair lift cable that bounced him out of the chair.   rolleyes.gif

post #165 of 179

was at Alta recently and noticed that none of the lift I was on had safety bars that I could recall.  struck me as odd but anyone know the reason why this was the case?

 

edited to say-i think I am mistaken.  I think the sugarloaf HS lifts had bars but no footrests.....sorry....


Edited by tekweezle - 4/13/11 at 12:53pm
post #166 of 179

I thought that at least one of the chairs had a bar with no foot rest?  And maybe one all the way over had a foot rest?  It's been a few years.....  But, that was my only complaint with the place when I took a trip there.  My circulation had stopped by the end of the chair ride and I could barely exit the chair at the top.  Had to stand around jumping around before I could ski down.  Pain in the ^%$.

post #167 of 179

chairlift story: there's this guy who has been at the mountain for many years, but his personality has a mixed effect on people, some like him and some don't, few are in between. he's a leg swinger. backing up. he wrote a letter to the resort management complaining that some coaches were taking mighty mights on KT lift where they were not skilled enough to ski some of the runs. he ratted out a coach for having some problems with his charges in the letter, "those kids don't belong on Kt 22..." he complained repeatedly . go forward. he's swinging his legs on the KT chair, safety bar down. he's 2/3 up the lift and catches a tip solidly in some 30 feet of snow and flips out of the chair, under the bar some how, with a yelp. go farther forward in time: some coaches see him and call out: "maybe you don't belong on KT 22!" man that came around quickly, ha!  So many times I've wished leg swingers would just disappear, and there you have it, sucked away.

post #168 of 179

we arent required helmets though.

post #169 of 179

Well at Sugarbush Resort in VT, we don't have foot rests on our chairs...so that defeats the foot rest purpose. Most of these new High powered quads are being used at ski resorts with no foot rests..the older lifts are mostly the ones with foot rests...which is unfortunate because as ski resorts are getting older they're wanting to improve their stuff, which would mean high powered quads.

post #170 of 179
Three year old thread? Why not resuscitate a helmet thread?
post #171 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Three year old thread? 

You'd rather he start a new one?

post #172 of 179
I'd rather that before he posts, he reads the whole thread and decide if there's anything new to add. You know these guys haven't. They read the title and jump right in.
post #173 of 179

Heck, this topic, and helmets are BOTH relevant these days with summer downhill biking starting to ramp up.  How does the safety bar work with bikes hanging from the chairs, any differences?  Also, should helmets be required for mountain bikers on resort property?:duck:

post #174 of 179

Up until this year my entire skiing experience has been at Jay Peak. so it's always been FL to VT to see family and to take advantage of said family as one of them works on the mountain. (Thanks Dana!)

 

But anyways, some time back in 1782 they had a town meeting in nearby Montgomery and after discussing maple sugar, cows, and the British they decided it would be a good idea for everyone to PUT THE BAR DOWN on the chair lift as young Ezekiel had fallen off last year and couldn't get to the barn for a month to do his share of the milking. Ever since then the bar goes down when you ski at Jay Peak, it's just the way it is...

 

Imagine my surprise when I finally made it out to Whitefish MT, largely due to sibhusky's excellent guide btw, and discovered crazy risk taking libertarian skiers riding the chair lift with the bar up!  I couldn't handle it, I had to have the bar down. I did notice a certain level of pity or disgust coming from my chair mates at times - they did not want to be shackled by a device conceived by a federal committee in Washington DC.

 

On day three I relented and bathed in the freedom of living dangerously and enjoyed it. I fit in finally!

 

On day 5 my feet started to hurt and I put the bar down anyways. I also yelled at a bunch of Texans stopped in the middle of an icy cat track - just like sibhusky taught me to!

post #175 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I'd rather that before he posts, he reads the whole thread and decide if there's anything new to add. You know these guys haven't. They read the title and jump right in.

 

If someone only posted to a thread if there was something new to add, most of the threads would be under one page, new or old.

post #176 of 179

I hate those bars that have the handle which comes down to touch the chair, sometimes smashing your dick and balls or leg in the process.  Those should be illegal.

post #177 of 179
Another reason to pull down the bar, stopping you from taking up part of my space.. ;-)
post #178 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post
 

I hate those bars that have the handle which comes down to touch the chair, sometimes smashing your dick and balls or leg in the process.  Those should be illegal.

 

Or the opposite, it catches you unloading. At last years Mid-Atlantic G2G the normal double chair at Blue Knob was broken so they were using the old one. It had one of those handles. Unfortunately for me when we pulled into the station the safety bar swung down by itself as I was unloading. The thing fortunately slipped off my junk and instead caught on my stomach, picked me up, and swung me around the bull wheel until I hit the stop gate. While painful, it could've been very painful had it caught a bit lower. 

post #179 of 179

See, Sib? This thread has legs even after 3 years.

 

I like the separation part, too. It's handy on those windy days when you have clown shoes on as well. I can't recall how many times I've had to hold on because my powder skis wanted to fly before we got off the lift.

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