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GA man allegedly punches 14-year-old girl in face at Beaver Creek - Page 2

post #31 of 56

Pete, instead of answering Tim's questions, you've edited them out of the post.

post #32 of 56

I think we're forgetting the real important question here. Was the girl on rockered skis?!?

post #33 of 56

And the run is named "Haymaker"?

post #34 of 56

Love the humor.

post #35 of 56

But you can only believe 20% of it.

post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by John J View Post

And the run is named "Haymaker"?



Yeah ... it's right beside "Uppercut" biggrin.gif 

 

Or to quote family guy, "POW - right in the kisser man ... right in the kisser".

post #37 of 56


always thought that was stolen from Jackie G, “One of these days, Alice. Pow! Right in the kisser!”

DESPITE what my kids think....So the real question is, what would Jackie have done if a 14 year old had hit Alice on a green run???
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorm57 View Post

 

Or to quote family guy, "POW - right in the kisser man ... right in the kisser".

post #38 of 56

If I'd been the father of the 14yr old that the Ga man did a beat down on.....

we would have been sharing a cell once he got out of the hospital!

duel.gif

post #39 of 56
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

 

There is no such thing as contemorary culture only phases of human behavior.  The truth is not a problem unless you are so deeply confused you can't recognize the truth.  Global cultural narrative is absolutlely anything.  So take your postmoderisn illusion and keep it in academia because thats the only place it should be, after all reality and real human behavior never permeated the campus elites of the world.   In other words you are full of crap.

 

 

You said that this story is only 20% correct because the reporter wasn't there and her research methods are based on reporting "hearsay". What hearsay would that be? You mean the offical police report and the statements from Vail resorts on how the guy is banned? Again how is this not right? This story dense and reads like a back page cut police blotter, not a sensationalised account. You really are making a postmodern critique of this news article.

 

The fact that you think that postmodernism is an illusion  made up by academics who don't know anything about reality or human behavior is sort of funny.

 

Merry Christmas.

post #40 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorm57 View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by John J View Post

And the run is named "Haymaker"?



Yeah ... it's right beside "Uppercut" biggrin.gif 

 

Or to quote family guy, "POW - right in the kisser man ... right in the kisser".


Maybe they'll have to rename it.  I suggest "Sucker Punch".
 

post #41 of 56
post #42 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post

http://www.summitdaily.com/ARTICLE/20101225/NEWS/101229885/-1/RSS

 

very sad


I'm having trouble picturing how this would happen. That's as sad as it gets.

post #43 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

someone "bumped" into my 4 yr old once and I did indeed go nuts. is it OK because he "bumped" and didn't hit, strike, crash, or run over the very tiny person? "avoiding another accident" : is that different from not skiing under control. I note the little twists of words. 



It's interesting, in that while an adult going "UFC" on a 14 year old girl following an on-slope collision of any sort is clearly beyond the pale, there are lots of posts and threads on here where people don't seem to accept that collisions are an inevitable outcome from skiing and riding on public slopes.  Many people do seem to infer some sort of carelessness from the fact that a collision occurred. 

 

It is in fact part of the game.  You can and should try to follow the Code and ski and ride responsibly, but with lots of people in motion sometimes two people will simply collide.  Basically, there are lots of people who simply should not be involved in motion or gravity sports because they are not willing to accept the risks of those sports.

 

bunk. bunk. bunk, and pure crap. because it's un-necessary to say, and contributes nothing to any body of knowledge or experience.

 

When a tiny kid's involved, everything changes. Safety has to trump all other behavior on the hill. Hit a little kid and you're done, over, dumpster's your home after that. Are you really unable to distinguish between the gravity of running into a 25 year old man and a four year old child?

 

as a society, we are pledged in many ways to protect and nourish our smallest and most fragile members, little children. there is a fundamental need to make safe space for them to play, give them room, don't even go into their space, don't go near them. let them enjoy skiing without worrying about YOU (large person skiing poorly), big, clumsy stupid ass.
 

post #44 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

someone "bumped" into my 4 yr old once and I did indeed go nuts. is it OK because he "bumped" and didn't hit, strike, crash, or run over the very tiny person? "avoiding another accident" : is that different from not skiing under control. I note the little twists of words. 



It's interesting, in that while an adult going "UFC" on a 14 year old girl following an on-slope collision of any sort is clearly beyond the pale, there are lots of posts and threads on here where people don't seem to accept that collisions are an inevitable outcome from skiing and riding on public slopes.  Many people do seem to infer some sort of carelessness from the fact that a collision occurred. 

 

It is in fact part of the game.  You can and should try to follow the Code and ski and ride responsibly, but with lots of people in motion sometimes two people will simply collide.  Basically, there are lots of people who simply should not be involved in motion or gravity sports because they are not willing to accept the risks of those sports.

 

bunk. bunk. bunk, and pure crap. because it's un-necessary to say, and contributes nothing to any body of knowledge or experience.

 

When a tiny kid's involved, everything changes. Safety has to trump all other behavior on the hill. Hit a little kid and you're done, over, dumpster's your home after that. Are you really unable to distinguish between the gravity of running into a 25 year old man and a four year old child?

 

as a society, we are pledged in many ways to protect and nourish our smallest and most fragile members, little children. there is a fundamental need to make safe space for them to play, give them room, don't even go into their space, don't go near them. let them enjoy skiing without worrying about YOU (large person skiing poorly), big, clumsy stupid ass.
 


This imo seems rather close to the mindset of the GA man doing the hitting in this case.  Again, his child and the child in the lesson who he punched in the face were on a public slope.  Accidents can and will occur.  Skiing and riding are safe and great activities for people of all ages, including young children, but on an open public slope it is entirely possible that anyone, a four year included, can get hit by someone else without there being fault on either side.  It is a simple reality of the sport.  For those not willing to accept this, particularly those who may have anger management issues, there are a number of recreational environments such as video arcades that do not present the same issues. 

post #45 of 56


 

Quote:

This imo seems rather close to the mindset of the GA man doing the hitting in this case.  Again, his child and the child in the lesson who he punched in the face were on a public slope.  Accidents can and will occur.  Skiing and riding are safe and great activities for people of all ages, including young children, but on an open public slope it is entirely possible that anyone, a four year included, can get hit by someone else without there being fault on either side.  It is a simple reality of the sport.  For those not willing to accept this, particularly those who may have anger management issues, there are a number of recreational environments such as video arcades that do not present the same issues. 



It's obvious and evident that we don't punch anyone for any reason. that's a given. what you know of mindset seems deficient.

 

my point is that when you see a very eensey, tiney, adorable little todler skiing, and you can see him, you take extra precautions, you slow WAY down, you turn to another part of the trail or hill.

 

when someone ran over my 4 year old, I was furious ("went nuts"), but didn't go over the top and hit anyone (a teen age girl on a snowboard) by the way, for the record.

post #46 of 56

Since this is the type of story that can cause reporters to browsed the web, etc., it may be helpful for them to know that Davluri often makes, well, out-there statements not necessarily grounded in the realities of the sport, e.g., talking about snow stability when he never skis backcountry, or in this case ignoring the fact that slopes are shared by all.  The web has all sorts.

post #47 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

Since this is the type of story that can cause reporters to browsed the web, etc., it may be helpful for them to know that Davluri often makes, well, out-there statements not necessarily grounded in the realities of the sport, e.g., talking about snow stability when he never skis backcountry, or in this case ignoring the fact that slopes are shared by all.  The web has all sorts.


I misused the term faceted. ooooh, got me. 

last I looked, we have plenty of unstable snow in bounds, and whatever windbuff does to the layers, don't call it faceted, OK, creates instability. didn't know I had to ski backcountry to know about snow stability. my bad.

 

backcountry. is that synonymous with something or some place holier than resorts. give me a break. It's becoming the newest fad for weak skiing posers. love to be able to talk about walking and not their bad skiing. crowding up the skin trails, making the more core hikers wait impatiently. harsh words. a real mess. parking all over the place, getting in fights about being blocked in. oh, yeah, count me in on that.

 

Around Tahoe, most of the big resorts have more out of the way runs, with backcountry skiing qualities, than wherever you have gleaned your realities of the sport.

 

If you want to dig around old posts to find some dirt, you may come across a large group of posters who think you are a pompous A$$. happy trails and keep up the research. that's what you're good at.

 

slopes are shared by all is not a simple fact. you are inferring something by saying that, and what you are inferring is not fact but your ill informed opinion that people take a necessary risk on the hills caused by careless and thoughtless people.

post #48 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

someone "bumped" into my 4 yr old once and I did indeed go nuts. is it OK because he "bumped" and didn't hit, strike, crash, or run over the very tiny person? "avoiding another accident" : is that different from not skiing under control. I note the little twists of words. 



It's interesting, in that while an adult going "UFC" on a 14 year old girl following an on-slope collision of any sort is clearly beyond the pale, there are lots of posts and threads on here where people don't seem to accept that collisions are an inevitable outcome from skiing and riding on public slopes.  Many people do seem to infer some sort of carelessness from the fact that a collision occurred. 

 

It is in fact part of the game.  You can and should try to follow the Code and ski and ride responsibly, but with lots of people in motion sometimes two people will simply collide.  Basically, there are lots of people who simply should not be involved in motion or gravity sports because they are not willing to accept the risks of those sports.

 

bunk. bunk. bunk, and pure crap. because it's un-necessary to say, and contributes nothing to any body of knowledge or experience.

 

When a tiny kid's involved, everything changes. Safety has to trump all other behavior on the hill. Hit a little kid and you're done, over, dumpster's your home after that. Are you really unable to distinguish between the gravity of running into a 25 year old man and a four year old child?

 

as a society, we are pledged in many ways to protect and nourish our smallest and most fragile members, little children. there is a fundamental need to make safe space for them to play, give them room, don't even go into their space, don't go near them. let them enjoy skiing without worrying about YOU (large person skiing poorly), big, clumsy stupid ass.
 

Wow. If you're that worried about your kid, don't take him skiing until he's a little less fragile. Maybe wrap him in bubble wrap and keep him in a padded room too. Just make sure there's a spot in there for you.

post #49 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

someone "bumped" into my 4 yr old once and I did indeed go nuts. is it OK because he "bumped" and didn't hit, strike, crash, or run over the very tiny person? "avoiding another accident" : is that different from not skiing under control. I note the little twists of words. 



It's interesting, in that while an adult going "UFC" on a 14 year old girl following an on-slope collision of any sort is clearly beyond the pale, there are lots of posts and threads on here where people don't seem to accept that collisions are an inevitable outcome from skiing and riding on public slopes.  Many people do seem to infer some sort of carelessness from the fact that a collision occurred. 

 

It is in fact part of the game.  You can and should try to follow the Code and ski and ride responsibly, but with lots of people in motion sometimes two people will simply collide.  Basically, there are lots of people who simply should not be involved in motion or gravity sports because they are not willing to accept the risks of those sports.

 

bunk. bunk. bunk, and pure crap. because it's un-necessary to say, and contributes nothing to any body of knowledge or experience.

 

When a tiny kid's involved, everything changes. Safety has to trump all other behavior on the hill. Hit a little kid and you're done, over, dumpster's your home after that. Are you really unable to distinguish between the gravity of running into a 25 year old man and a four year old child?

 

as a society, we are pledged in many ways to protect and nourish our smallest and most fragile members, little children. there is a fundamental need to make safe space for them to play, give them room, don't even go into their space, don't go near them. let them enjoy skiing without worrying about YOU (large person skiing poorly), big, clumsy stupid ass.
 

Wow. If you're that worried about your kid, don't take him skiing until he's a little less fragile. Maybe wrap him in bubble wrap and keep him in a padded room too. Just make sure there's a spot in there for you.



how old are you? what exactly is your experience with anything at all?

my son is now in college, full scholarship, top skier. I don't think how I raised him is something you can judge.  Just how narrow is your point of reference?

post #50 of 56

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
my point is that when you see a very eensey, tiney, adorable little todler skiing, and you can see him, you take extra precautions, you slow WAY down, you turn to another part of the trail or hill.

 

 

Good advice. I remember doing exactly that one day.  It was really weird.  The hill was easy, my abilities not in question, yet for some reason a little voice in the back of my mind told me to shut it down, and I did (I have learned not to ignore that voice, but that's another story).
 

post #51 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

Since this is the type of story that can cause reporters to browsed the web, etc., it may be helpful for them to know that Davluri often makes, well, out-there statements not necessarily grounded in the realities of the sport, e.g., talking about snow stability when he never skis backcountry, or in this case ignoring the fact that slopes are shared by all.  The web has all sorts.


I misused the term faceted. ooooh, got me. 

last I looked, we have plenty of unstable snow in bounds, and whatever windbuff does to the layers, don't call it faceted, OK, creates instability. didn't know I had to ski backcountry to know about snow stability...


The point, which you are re-emphasizing, is that you often make statements without any factual basis, and often, in the case of things like snow stability, about topics where getting it wrong can actually have consequences. 

post #52 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post


 



 


 


this thread is not about me, or you for that matter.  Drop it!  ( funny in a thread about violence, you can't let your little conflict go.)

 

edit: delete quoted post


Edited by davluri - 12/27/10 at 11:36am
post #53 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post


Well, we found the cause of the accident.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dexter View Post



She, not he.


 


Really???

 

 

(Sorry, just felt the need to address that little gem of wisdom.)

post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


 

Quote:
 


how old are you? what exactly is your experience with anything at all?

my son is now in college, full scholarship, top skier. I don't think how I raised him is something you can judge.  Just how narrow is your point of reference?

 

Wow, irrelevant questions to cover up a lack of perspective. Textbook.

 

You picked the wrong thread to get all defensive about kids skiing. If the story in question had been about a guy punching a full-grown man for running into his kid, or yelling at a 14-year-old, maybe your position would be defensible. As it were, the story was about a grown man punching a 14-year-old. Girl. That is about as reprehensible as it gets. And it is simply inexcusable. So your whole rant about how four-year-olds need to be protected by some sort of halo, and how it's okay to go ape shit when someone dares break that halo (completely by accident, mind you) is just out of place in this discussion.

 

My point has nothing to do with your parenting skills; it has everything to do with your perspective. Or, more accurately, your complete lack thereof. It's your child; it's your job to protect him. Not the mountain of nameless skiers. And if an accident happens, it's not okay to go psycho just because your kid was involved.

 

But I guess all that doesn't matter anyway,  since you're just stirring the pot. Good job. Feel free to keep questioning my credentials to try to get people to look past the ridiculousness of what you wrote, though.
 

post #55 of 56

I think that in many situations skiers, over estimate their level of control. We see a good skier making turns down a slope at a reasonable speed and say oh yea he is skiing in control. Even for a good skier on a run that they ski every day, a single mistake can send you into a totally unintended direction. On public slopes you cannot predict all the variables given that other skiers are on the slope with you. Eventually, someone will do something that you do not expect. Its not a matter of if but when. 

post #56 of 56


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post


 



 


 


this thread is not about me, or you for that matter.  Drop it!  ( funny in a thread about violence, you can't let your little conflict go.)

 

edit: delete quoted post


No conflict at all, just reminding people to look at the source if they, for instance, read you saying that a collision with a younger child inevitably and always places an older child or adult in the wrong and fair game for some extreme reaction.  Since you in numerous threads make statements not grounded in the reality of the sport, it is a fair thing to note, particularly since you seem to now justify a response, "going nuts" if a child is in an accidental collision, that is the exact opposite of what appropriate behavior would be.

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