or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

EdgeTune Pro

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 

Does anyone have any experience with this tool?  Saw it and thought it might be a quicker way to tune my race skis.  Any info is appreciated.  Thanks!

post #2 of 35

I've been recently looking at this as well.  I searched for a few threads but no one ever posted up their experience.

post #3 of 35

This below was lifted from another thread:

 

the U.S. race market is split between the TRIone, and the Snowglide. these both work extremely well, and there are pros and cons to each. price is about the same for each. I do not feel that there is a clear best choice between those two. We own and use the Snowglide at our shop. We have had many podiums in the Tahoe area with athletes on skis prepped with the Snowglide. We chose the Snowglide because the ski sits base up, and it is ergonomically easier to keep the device clean on the edge.

 

I have talked to a parent of a top level collegiate athlete that is using a portable battery operated unit that is distributed by wintersteiger that is considerably cheaper, but i have no personal experience. it looks difficult to control as the ski is up on edge. also the cutting stone looks suspect.

 

the unit you are talking about that uses a dremel tool looks like junk. it is advertised on ski racing online. and based on the video clip, i am guessing that you will be very disappointed with the end result. when you see either the TRIone or the Snowglide up close and then look at the lack of precision in a dremel tool, you will understand why i am concerned. the discs for the TRIone or the Snowglide cost more than 6 complete dremel tools. if you put the stone that they ship with that device on you edges, you will absolutely deserve the result that you get.

 

one word of caution to any of you considering these options is the danger to your health using these machines. they put off a very fine cloud of metal dust that can be breathed into your lungs. there has been a few WC techs that have experienced issues with this dust getting into their lungs. eye protection and a respirator is mandatory as well as some type of magnets on the tool or on the edge of your bench below your vice are needed to pull the dust out of the air.

 

just for the record the benefits of machines is speed and work reduction if you have many skis that need to be done in a short period of time. there are still many WC techs (especially in SG and DH) that still use hand files. for an individual masters racer, doing only your own skis, you will find that by the time you set up the machine, you could have touched up your skis with a file.

 

jim

 
post #4 of 35

Thanks for finding that quant.  I know that Jim owns a ski shop and that his tunes are his livelihood and thus its probably a wise investment to shell out over $3500 for the snowglide.  I was wondering if anyone has any hands on experience with it? I think its silly to compare machines that cost over $3000 to a dremel tool attachment.  Of course the discs on the professional tools will cost a bunch more the stones for the edgetune. Parts for an expensive car are going to cost more then they would for a camry.  Automatically excluding something based on price and how it appears online isn't exactly the review I was looking for. 

 

I found the thread you referenced that from and saw that someone purchased it and promptly returned it; it'd be nice to see why he was so unimpressed.  I think the poster in that thread that mentioned the WC techs saying that if they had to purchase the expensive machines with their own money; they'd stick to hand filing.  That tells me all I need to know and will stay with the set up I have.

 

Thanks again for leading me in the right direction.

post #5 of 35

We're pleased that EdgeTune Pro is being discussed in this forum. However, it is wrong to allow one voice to brand a product "junk" when they have never even seen our tool, which is a precise Dremel jig with full adjustment for a very fine, accurate grind. The 600 grit ceramic stone does not generate heat, nor does it ruin an edge. With our new EdgeTune Pro, we have had no returns and several hundred very pleased customers (incl. many racing clubs, and a couple of world cup tuners). Is it for the back shop high volume tuner? No. It is targeted for high end skiers/racing clubs looking for a precise, easy re-sharpening tool, while saving their precious edges (fine grit grinding removes 1/10 the material of a file). As for the precision of the Dremel tool, we tested several rotary tool manufacturers, and Dremel was by far the most accurate, utilizing class 5 in-line ball bearings on a balanced armature. There is no 'wobble," and the grind results hold up to a 30X inspection. Please check us out with an open mind at www.edgetune.com. Just because we're $100 bucks doesn't mean we're cheap...in fact, if we chose to sell through retail chains, the price would have to be over $250 for everyone's cut in this industry. Be sharp!

post #6 of 35

i've been quite intersted in this tool just to do my own tune ups. but what is that guy saying about breathing in dust and magnets? do you really need to wear a mask to sharpen skiis with the edgetune?

post #7 of 35

I have both the Wintersteiger Discman and the Edge Tune (1st version). Personally I found the Wintersteiger is a better machine of the two for polishing the ski edge. With the Edge Tune and the Dremel, because the of the weight of the Dremel, I found it tricky to keep the grinding disc at a steady angle when moving down the ski edge. Also, the Edge Tune adjust the edge bevel angle by means of adding (or subtracting) layer of sticky tape clipped to the edge of the jig, I have reservation about the accuracy of this method.

post #8 of 35

 

 

The easy quick fix.

 

Where is the soul in the Tune?

 

You're Dad is ashamed.

 

 

post #9 of 35

 Scavenger, I  saw that thread just after I posted mine, it never turned up when I ran "edge tune pro" through the infamous search engine. You seem to be the only poster to have real experience with it, what is your opinion of it now, a couple of months later? Is it so unstable for you to use that it isn't worth it, or does it do a good job if you are thorough and take your time? Just wonderin'.

 Chenzo, does that mean that you never get any type of stone grind cause there's no heart in it?? My dad would never be ashamed of me looking for better ways to better ends..rolleyes.gif

post #10 of 35

flog57, I have the earlier version of the Edge Tune Pro and also the Wintersteiger Discman. As I said before, I prefer the Wintersteiger which in my opinion gives a better finish and easier to use, of course it is bit more expensive.

 

As I understand Edge Tune is now selling the Edge Tune Pro Version 2,, I do not know what improvement is there.

post #11 of 35

Time to give something back to this community ...

 

Some weeks ago I ordered a set of the Edgetune Pro device.  Very good service, fast delivery, good followup, all you might want.

 

Then part one : learning how to use it.  My very personal findings :

  • Make sure you have an old pair of skis you don't plan to use anymore.  It takes some "training" to get used to the tool, don't try it on real skis, you will probably ruin them.  I'm a DIY type of person and it took me about an hour of practice in total, I organised myself a bit in my workshop, tried it, tried the screws on this version, tried how to get the best grip.
  • The outcome : it works, honestly, I tried the Wintersteiger myself as well.  The Wintersteiger has a faster learning curve, you can basically use that one straight away.  This tool needs a bit more of practice.  However, now that I "master" it, I would be happy to "compete" with any Wintersteiger user from a usability point of view.  The most difficult part is the "starting", once your device is gliding along the skies, it's very simple to handle.
  • The result : you get a very sharp edge, no discussion about it.  However, I then took my skies for a test ...  Already on the lift going up, I got in trouble.  When you just use the tool, you get a very small "burr" (hope this is the right word).  You can not really see it, but you can feel it.  Especially if you need to go over your edge a couple of times to changes the angle, this little iron burr starts to built (I think because of the small, but still existing heat) ...  You absolutely need to remove this, the skis literally go all directions, a total nightmare.  Especially on icy snow conditions ...  When I came back, I used a diamond file anyway to take it away.  Next try next week, but I'm sure it will be fine now ...
  • Having said that, I have "mixed" feelings ...  For now, I will continue to use it for my own skies and for all skies of my family members, but I will not touch my sons racing equipment with it.  2 reasons : I'm not yet convinced and, my son is 10 years old, there's no way at all he could use this !  Because of the "hollow edge" result, according to me, you can't combine using the tools one day, using traditional material on other occasions ...
  • No doubt in my mind using this tool is faster.  Hence my plan is to use it for all skies of the family (lots to do ...) but not for the racing ones ...

 

Hope this gives some people some inside from a real user, a very personal opinion ...

post #12 of 35

Thanks diederw! That answers a couple of questions I had, particularly about the "hollow" grind aspect. If it put a flat beveled grind on the edge I would consider going for it but I don't want to mess with curved surfaces, I also wonder if the resulting thinner profile of the sharpened edge would be more likely to suffer greater damage or be easier to damage from the rocks and crap that I occasionally seem to find. I pretty much expected that you would have to do some diamond work and polishing to finish them up. Thanks again for the info. Joel 

post #13 of 35

In the mean time I tested the polished up result ...  That works ...  The first attempt was really a nightmare.

A couple of weeks further down the road now, I have almost put the 2 screws in the edgetool at the same level.  So forget about the "hollow" thing.  It works much better now.  I only have a very very slight difference, so it's not "perfectly" flat yet.  I'll see how it goes ...

post #14 of 35
Hello. I have previously purchased the Edge Pro. I have been tuning my skis as a Masters racer for twenty years. This product is an inferior piece of goods. Unsafe for your edges. You have been warned.
post #15 of 35

Regarding the health effects of metal fume/particulate matter.  I'm an industrial safety and health professional, so this is right up my alley.  First, fume occurs when a metal is heated to the point where it changes phase to a gas.  This device could never heat the metal enough to create fume (like would occur during welding or cutting operations).  Regarding particulates, their ability to cause serious lung damage is a function of particle size, concentration, and duration of exposure.  First, while a percentage of the partical sizes might be small enough to penetrate into the deep lung (respirable), its likelky that its a small percentage, therefore any adverse health effects would be mainly upper respiratory tract irritation, less risky than deep lung disorders.  Second, occupational exposure limits are based on 8 hour time weighted averages.  If you use this tool for an hour or so even every week during the season, you would never even begin to approach any permissible exposure limits for total dust or any specific metal contaminant, based on my experience with occupational air sampling.  Finally, since the exposure is for particulates, the appropriate respirator is an N95 dust mask, that you buy at any hardware store.  So bottom line, I wouldn't have much concern for respiratory disorder (unless you were tuning for 8 hours a day, at least 5 days a week).  Frankly the organic vapors created by waxing are probably more hazardous and require a more unique type of respiratory protection, I'm a little surprised i rarely see techs in shops wearing an organic vapor cartridge style respiratory.   I would if i were them.  Again the time and concentration a home tuner is exposed to is really not a cause for concern.

 

As for the tool, I'm considering buying one this season.  I have been using a manual tool from skivisions and I'm simply want to be able to clean up edges faster.  a sharper edge is also desirable.

post #16 of 35

Te EdgeTune actually had 3 models and I own the very first one which is capable of doing both base and side bevel.  The second model has similar spring suspension contact with the edge but is capable only of working on the side bevel.  The latest one has the edge glide control using two screws. 

 

The first model had a problem with using the grinding stones really fast -- usualy no more than 4 pairs of skis per stone since the side of the stone was working during the side bevel gring and the stone was developing grooves which lead to the bad / dull edge so the frequent stone touch-ups were required. 

 

I did retrofit my EdgeTune with the steel angle so that the Dremel may be attached in the same direction as in the tool versions 2 & 3 and this took care of the groove in the stone problem.  The tool definitely require some skills and practice but in my opinion produces decent results.  I usually do one pass with the EdgeTune and finish with the medium ceramic stone.  In my opinion there is a limit of the effort the amatures like us should put into the edge work since most of the ski edges are made from the crappy soft steel so no matter how sharp you make it the edge will became dull fairly quickly. 

 

I ski on Head skis and most of my skis (iSS, Monsters, TTs) have LiquidMetal jacket.  With this setup the ceramic stones which come with EdgeTune are useless.  I use the proper size 300 grit aluminum oxide stones and they produce good results.  Actually using the cheap stone is one of the tools advantages.  I would only imagine how much work is required to cleanup the expensive diamond disks after they worked on aluminum-like alloy like the Liquidmetal is.

post #17 of 35

I have been reading these posts because I am looking for an edge tool that I can use for my families skis. My budget is roughly what I would pay to have my families skis done (5 pair) once.  We are not racers, and we only get in about 10 days of skiing per season all in the northeast. The opinion of Mr ski shop owner who wants to continue to gouge the public doesn't concern me  and neither does the opinion of  Mr master racer (whatever that means) good for you, you go fast.  I need the opinion of Joe family guy skier who has decisions he has to make in this economy.  I have been skiing for 40 of my 47 years on crappy second hand skis with dull edges. Every once in a while I get a decent tuning but not nearly as often as I probably should.  So my questions are Does this tool ruin skis? and Does using this tool give me a better edge than not getting my edges done at all?  If anyone has an alternative to this device that doesn't cost one or several mortgage payments, I would love to hear about it.

post #18 of 35

Look at the multi-FSK tool, a lot cheaper, not as fast and less likely to do damage if you screw up. It also does base angles.  Sold by one of the sponsers of this site www.racewax.com

 

No I don't work for them, but have bought from them and the service is great.

post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drippy Purell View Post

I have been reading these posts because I am looking for an edge tool that I can use for my families skis. My budget is roughly what I would pay to have my families skis done (5 pair) once.  We are not racers, and we only get in about 10 days of skiing per season all in the northeast. The opinion of Mr ski shop owner who wants to continue to gouge the public doesn't concern me  and neither does the opinion of  Mr master racer (whatever that means) good for you, you go fast.  I need the opinion of Joe family guy skier who has decisions he has to make in this economy.  I have been skiing for 40 of my 47 years on crappy second hand skis with dull edges. Every once in a while I get a decent tuning but not nearly as often as I probably should.  So my questions are Does this tool ruin skis? and Does using this tool give me a better edge than not getting my edges done at all?  If anyone has an alternative to this device that doesn't cost one or several mortgage payments, I would love to hear about it.

real world dyi tuning, check.

 

try the SKS Multi tool. no need for motorization at home. just buy a coarse and medium diamond to de-burr rock damage and LOTS of replacement files for the SKS. If your file is sharp, your work will go quickly enough.

post #20 of 35

Excellent suggestions guys. Thank you.  That seems to be just what the Dr ordered.

post #21 of 35
I really tried very hard to get this tool to work and experimented on a bunch of old skis. Also tried to "save" an old pair of Supershapes used as rock skis. In my opinion, it puts too much heat into the ski and you kind of end up with a case hardened edge. I really had an open mind, but I am back to my old methods.
post #22 of 35

O.k. guys...I feel as if I must post on this. For even the average race tuner.....A STANDARD, RUN OF THE MILL (pun intended) FILE PROGRESSION JUST WORKS BETTER!!!! If you want /need a "shortcut" go for it (at your own risk).....If you want the "real deal" (i.e., what some  w/c techs use, click this link www.verdonkracing.com  ......$$$$$$ ) Thor is well known, I assure you...Improper use of the "blank blank Pro-- wink wink---, can ruin a good pair. 

 

  P.s. I have tried the "blank blank Pro", and I say again, be careful...

 

  P.s. (pt. 2).....If anyone here wants to discuss proper/various filing techniques (including race, if you wish) let me know....we can start a fresh threadsmile.gif

 

  P.s. (pt.3)....... think wal-mart hunting knife vs. high end Benchmade.....

 

 

   Regards, zentune


Edited by zentune - 11/30/12 at 8:14pm
post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

O.k. guys...I feel as if I must post on this. For even the average race tuner.....A STANDARD, RUN OF THE MILL (pun intended) FILE PROGRESSION JUST WORKS BETTER!!!! If you want /need a "shortcut" go for it (at your own risk).....If you want the "real deal" (i.e., what some  w/c techs use, click this link www.verdonkracing.com  ......$$$$$$ ) Thor is well known, I assure you...Improper use of the "blank blank Pro-- wink wink---, can ruin a good pair. 

 

  P.s. I have tried the "blank blank Pro", and I say again, be careful...

 

  P.s. (pt. 2).....If anyone here wants to discuss proper/various filing techniques (including race, if you wish) let me know....we can start a fresh threadsmile.gif

 

  P.s. (pt.3)....... think wal-mart hunting knife vs. high end Benchmade.....

 

 

   Regards, zentune

  Regarding fresh thread...I am not claiming tuning mastery here. All methods/questions are valid, imho....

post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drippy Purell View Post

I have been reading these posts because I am looking for an edge tool that I can use for my families skis. My budget is roughly what I would pay to have my families skis done (5 pair) once.  We are not racers, and we only get in about 10 days of skiing per season all in the northeast. The opinion of Mr ski shop owner who wants to continue to gouge the public doesn't concern me  and neither does the opinion of  Mr master racer (whatever that means) good for you, you go fast.  I need the opinion of Joe family guy skier who has decisions he has to make in this economy.  I have been skiing for 40 of my 47 years on crappy second hand skis with dull edges. Every once in a while I get a decent tuning but not nearly as often as I probably should.  So my questions are Does this tool ruin skis? and Does using this tool give me a better edge than not getting my edges done at all?  If anyone has an alternative to this device that doesn't cost one or several mortgage payments, I would love to hear about it.

  For your situation, I couldn't agree with davluri morewink.gif,especially considering 10 days of skiing per season. Filing your family's skis once (in the fall, before the season, so your'e not "rushed"), would be all you would likely need. Once the season starts, just touch them up every other time out with the diamonds....smile.gif

post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

O.k. guys...I feel as if I must post on this. For even the average race tuner.....A STANDARD, RUN OF THE MILL (pun intended) FILE PROGRESSION JUST WORKS BETTER!!!! If you want /need a "shortcut" go for it (at your own risk).....If you want the "real deal" (i.e., what some  w/c techs use, click this link www.verdonkracing.com  ......$$$$$$ ) Thor is well known, I assure you...Improper use of the "blank blank Pro-- wink wink---, can ruin a good pair. 

 

  P.s. I have tried the "blank blank Pro", and I say again, be careful...

 

  P.s. (pt. 2).....If anyone here wants to discuss proper/various filing techniques (including race, if you wish) let me know....we can start a fresh threadsmile.gif

 

  P.s. (pt.3)....... think wal-mart hunting knife vs. high end Benchmade.....

 

 

   Regards, zentune

Just a comment about pt.3 It is not the knife that makes the edge but the sharpener, the difference between the quality is how long the edge remains once obtained.

 

Skis I think from the most part are not as critical on the edge material as knives are.  More important is the edge angles and the cleanliness of the edge.

 

Just my 2 cents

 

G

post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

Just a comment about pt.3 It is not the knife that makes the edge but the sharpener, the difference between the quality is how long the edge remains once obtained.

 

Skis I think from the most part are not as critical on the edge material as knives are.  More important is the edge angles and the cleanliness of the edge.

 

Just my 2 cents

 

G

  Sorry..it was meant as a reference as to the "quality" of certain products (edgetune vs. Thor Verdonks "snowglide", ie. you get what you pay for...)  Not in any way in regards to the difference between ski steel/shapness vs. knife steel sharpness. After reading my post though, I can see why people would think that..rolleyes.gif

 

 Thanks for pointing that out, oldschool!!!!

 

 P.s. as a follow up, I seriously doubt that wc techs are using the edgetune as is claimed by edgtune in post 5...at least not on their athletes skis anyway....

post #27 of 35

I'd never heard of this Verdonk thing, so went to their website.  That's like for SHOPS, this guy is looking for stuff for his house.  You're comparing an elephant (Verdonk) to a snail (Edgetune thingy).  Personally, I wouldn't get some Dremel tool and take it to my skis, I have a hard enough time holding steady with a bevel guide and diamond stone, the last thing I need is some whirling mechanized item to bobble.  That's the main thing I have against that thing.  If you don't know what you are doing, get the thing that is least likely to screw things up royally.  I wouldn't even hand him a file, I'd have him start with the stone progression.  Once that's a cinch and he's had some practice, then he can have a file.  

post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

  Sorry..it was meant as a reference as to the "quality" of certain products (edgetune vs. Thor Verdonks "snowglide", ie. you get what you pay for...)  Not in any way in regards to the difference between ski steel/shapness vs. knife steel sharpness. After reading my post though, I can see why people would think that..rolleyes.gif

 

 Thanks for pointing that out, oldschool!!!!

 

 P.s. as a follow up, I seriously doubt that wc techs are using the edgetune as is claimed by edgtune in post 5...at least not on their athletes skis anyway....

No prob's, sooner or later someone is going to catch me the same way eek.gif icon14.gif  I think it is that the mind is too fast for the fingers biggrin.gif

post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I'd never heard of this Verdonk thing, so went to their website.  That's like for SHOPS, this guy is looking for stuff for his house.  You're comparing an elephant (Verdonk) to a snail (Edgetune thingy).  Personally, I wouldn't get some Dremel tool and take it to my skis, I have a hard enough time holding steady with a bevel guide and diamond stone, the last thing I need is some whirling mechanized item to bobble.  That's the main thing I have against that thing.  If you don't know what you are doing, get the thing that is least likely to screw things up royally.  I wouldn't even hand him a file, I'd have him start with the stone progression.  Once that's a cinch and he's had some practice, then he can have a file.  

  Exactly sib, things of this nature are best left in the hands of pros, for suresmile.gif I just wanted to show people what a "real one" looked like, thats all....And we agree, it would seem...filing for the casual and even serious tuner is probably bestwink.gif

 

  P.s. btw, certainly NOT suggesting he should consider the snowglide (expensive!!) THIS would be what wc techs would use Thor used to be a tech on the circuit for rossi, if I recall....


Edited by zentune - 12/1/12 at 9:42am
post #30 of 35

After some more experience a new posting about this tool ... To cut a long story short : this tool hardens the edges extremely ... So having said that : don't use it on race skis, doing a manual adjustment after using this tool is impossible ! So what about your all mountain skis ? If you take your tool with you to the mountains, the hardened edge has the advantage that during a ski week even with hard icy slopes, your edges will be sharp longer (tested that out). But forget it to make any adjustments without the tool. So you need to take it with you ... Still need to make up my mind for the winter !

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs