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Do I need new skis?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Alright.

 

 

So, I am 5'3 and I am starting to go more and more off of the groomers and such. I  would say I am a decent skier. I have 140cm rossignol viper x1 skis. They are beginner skis and seem to be fairly narrow compared to the rest of the people. They have comp J bindings on them as well which are also beginner bindings. I went into some powder a few times and it is awful. I have only gone on 5-7 powder runs but I am skiing on powder as if it were my first day skiing. I have my legs spread far apart, doing pizza turns and going very slow. Even still I fall. Is this because I need more time in pow or is it my skis? If I got new skis what do you reccomend for all around cheap skis. (should I get new bindings or just transfer the ones off of the skis I have now?) 

 

If I got new skiis what are a decent pair that will be good for all mountain under 300 dollars and what length should they be? (I am 5'3 now)


Edited by sugarluver - 12/12/10 at 7:10pm
post #2 of 20
Thread Starter 

...?

post #3 of 20

From this page you can find the recommended body weight for each length of ski. 140cm tops out around 105 lbs.

 

http://www.backcountry.com/store/sizingchart.html?sizing_id=247

 

However, when you mentioned snowplowing in powder, it made me think about how the foot patterns for powder are different than on harder snow. In hard snow during a turn most of your weight will be on the outside foot; in powder you will be much more evenly balanced. When I first started powder skiing, the things I concentrated on were: 1) keeping my feet together, 2) positioning my upper body towards the inside of the turn, and 3) tipping my skis by rolling my knees.

 

But I think you're right. It's always time for a new pair of skis. :-)

post #4 of 20

How much do you weigh?

post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 

I weigh 115 lbs.

 

What do you think of these?: http://k2skis.com/skis/youth/juvy  in 149cm.

 

post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 

I wiegh 115. Would these be good for me in 149cm?: http://k2skis.com/skis/youth/juvy 

post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 

so

I weigh 115 lbs. I have been looking around for a decent set of skis for me since my skis won't work for when I get into a lot of powder later down the road (they are a groomed beginner ski). I found some K2's but I want to know what you guys think? Will they work for groomed runs as well as powder?

 

149cm

 

http://k2skis.com/skis/youth/juvy 

post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 

I weigh 115.

 

I saw these though:

 

http://k2skis.com/skis/youth/juvy 

 

they are 149cm. but the waiste is 75mm (too narrow?).  they come with bindings. I just can't see myself getting a 350 dollar pair of skis and then buying a 150 dollar pair of bindings just to outgrow the skis one year later.

 

What do you think?

 

- There are many runs I have yet to try and I would like to know some good ones that aren't too gnarly. Which runs and where are they at? (alta of course) 

post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 

Would those be a decent ski based off what I said earlier?

 

Thanks

post #10 of 20

If you are snowplowing in powder, lessons may help more than new skis.  Some skis can make the powder somewhat easier to handle, but spending time in the stuff and having solid fundamentals is the real key.  If you decide on skis, think about picking up something used, especially if you are still growing and/or improving as a skier.

post #11 of 20

Calm down man, no need for the 4 additional replies.  Just wait and people will comment.  I completely agree with MEfree, and I don't even think you should be venturing off-piste or anywhere off of the groomers until you become at the very least an intermediate to advanced skier.  You need to learn the technique and become familiar with the body movements before you start to explore the various types of skiing.  Stay on the groomers and improve.

 

Tyler

post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastskier44 View Post

Calm down man, no need for the 4 additional replies.  Just wait and people will comment.  I completely agree with MEfree, and I don't even think you should be venturing off-piste or anywhere off of the groomers until you become at the very least an intermediate to advanced skier.  You need to learn the technique and become familiar with the body movements before you start to explore the various types of skiing.  Stay on the groomers and improve.

 

Tyler


+1  And take some lessons.

post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 

Ok,

 

  I just get kind of bored of the groomers. Even the more difficult ones get old. I like to find the runs that aren't groomed but are tracked down by skiers in most spots with like forking moguls and such. I have taken lessons many times as a kid and like I said I will try to get another one. I don't think it is as much an issue about out growing new skis because my 2 younger brothers can have them or I could sell them. I have read a lot of places that the skis should be aroun chin to nose level for beginners to intermediate but mine are about to my upper neck. I got these skis 2 years ago when they were about to my nose.

 

eastskiier,

 

  I do mostly ski the groomers but I have been wanting more and more lately to go into off groomed. I will be skiing A LOT in the next 3-4 weeks for Christmas break and I will get a good amount of time up there on the groomers but I also want to keep trying a run called ballroom which is one of the most mellow off piste runs there.

 

I don't know what you mean by intermediate to advanced skiier but I am comfortable on all of the blue sqaure groomed runs at Alta and I go on all of the black groomed runs I know of. What would this count as?

post #14 of 20
Perhaps you made a snowplow comment and that made people think your a knob. To answer your question on powder skis, in general I would recommend they are a few inches taller than you. Waist under foot in the 105+ range, 115+ is better. Once you have your pow skis, take a powder ski lesson as there is no snow blowing allowed;)
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post

Perhaps you made a snowplow comment and that made people think your a knob. To answer your question on powder skis, in general I would recommend they are a few inches taller than you. Waist under foot in the 105+ range, 115+ is better. Once you have your pow skis, take a powder ski lesson as there is no snow blowing allowed;)


 

 

LOL, After a snow storm, I bring up my snowblower and clear off the snow that the cat couldn't reach.

 

 

I want a ski that can do like half powder half groomers since they would be my only pair of skis. I saw some online but they look like they might be a bit cheap quality but I want to see what you think:  http://www.levelninesports.com/Head-Mojo-Mix-Twin-Tip-Ski-Yellowred  they are 80 width waiste length.
 

post #16 of 20

For powder skiing an 80 waist doesn't work any deeper than maybe 6 inches of fresh for me, so not what I would consider a powder ski. As I previously said and if you read other threads on this topic (highly recommend you do so)  a waist under foot starting in the 105+ range,  to 115+ is better for a powder orientated ski. You should plan on at least a 2 pair quiver IMO. Something 90ish for all mountain firm days and something 110ish+ for a soft snow day. The 90 waist works well up to 6 inches of soft and the wider waist ski picks it up from there. Just my 2 cents if I was starting from scratch.

post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 

I went by to the levelnine sports place. I did two things, looked at skis and got new boots. first the boots, the guy measured my foot and it came to a 26. I told him about my problem and he said since I am growing I should get a 26.5. So we got fisher ski boots in 26.5. I got those ones because they felt less roomy than this other pair and they felt more like I could transfer energy with my foot without killing my toe like my old pair. He also said my skis are WAAY too small when I told him I plan on doing powder. So I looked at some 151 Pilgrim skis that had a 90 waiste (beats my old skis with 60). He said he would give me a discount since they were previously drilled but were still new. Like I said though, I want to be able to do all-mountain doing powder and groomers since I can't just ski powder everytime I ski.

 

 

post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 

I think since I don't weigh as much maybe the width doesn't have to be as wide as some heavier guys who ski powder.

post #19 of 20

Icelantic Pilgrims are great skiis.  They can just about do it all.  A friend skis just about exclusively on Pilgrims.

post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 

Ok cool they are taking off 50 dollars because the skis were drilled. I'll go check out some new runs though for sure, I am going up to Alta like the next 7 days straight hopefully, it will be fun. 

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