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How to Carry Water Bottle

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Good evening for all of your good downhill skiers out there.

 

How many of you need to carry a water bottle with you when downhill skiing? 

 

If you do what are some recommend ways of carrying that water bottle so it is not in the way and not too bulky?

 

Thanks need suggestions on how to carry one around. Cheers

post #2 of 27

Not 100% what you asked but I use a winter camel back (w/ insulated hose).  If its below 20 degrees make sure to fill it with warm or hot water in the morning and blow back the water when you are done drinking or it will still freeze.

 

You can slip a smaller water bottle on the inside pocket of you coat but it would be prone to falling our ot falling on (ouch).

post #3 of 27

Use a curved flask, not much bigger than a pint, and carry it in an inside jacket pocket.

post #4 of 27

Jacket pocket.

post #5 of 27

I use a Platypus Sport Bottle I carry in a goggle pocket.  It's flat and expands as filled.  You can put about half a liter in and it takes no more room than a goggle would.  Total capacity is a liter.

 

31Q6SGRPK8L._AA300_.jpg

post #6 of 27

A "Platypus" soft bottle is by far the best solution I have found after trying many options:

 

SoftBottle.jpg

 

More info here: http://cascadedesigns.com/platypus/handheld-hydration/category

 

I use an older 1/2 L version that stashes nicely in the inner breast pocket of my ski jacket.  I normally only fill it about 70% and squeeze the air out to make it more compact, then refill as needed during the day.

 

I bought a few of these from Amazon for about $5 each.  So far they have held up great over three years of abuse in a range of sports.  By the way, they are great for biking if you want to carry an extra water in the back pocket of a cycling jersey.  This is my reserve strategy for long rides that may exceed the two hard bottles that fit on my bike.

 

post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

Use a curved flask, not much bigger than a pint, and carry it in an inside jacket pocket.


I did that at one time (diffrent liquid) and fell, and the flask dug into a rib and either bruised it or fractured it. not sure...just knew it hurt like all git out for a month. Maybe in back pocket or in a leg pocket but theres no give to one of those metal flasks.  I'm a firm believer in the KISS method. Keep It Super Simple. I keep a water bottle in a small backpack and grab another at lunch time after I'm done with that one. 

post #8 of 27

Another vote for the Platypus bottle.  I've been eek.gifspeared by a regular 16 oz water bottle before too.  This thread reminded me that I've been meaning to order that Platypus that Skier 219 showed me last March.  The website wants like 9 bucks for shipping a flat envelope.  eBay has some that are a bit less deliveredwink.gif

post #9 of 27
I too use a small platypus bottle when I carry water. They Morph to a comfortable shape in any pocket and can be refilled with snow. Carried in an inside pocket it will easily melt the snow. I've fallen on it and never noticed it was there.

.ma
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Another vote for the Platypus bottle.  I've been eek.gifspeared by a regular 16 oz water bottle before too.  This thread reminded me that I've been meaning to order that Platypus that Skier 219 showed me last March.  The website wants like 9 bucks for shipping a flat envelope.  eBay has some that are a bit less deliveredwink.gif


Dec 14, 2010

 

Hi crgildart:

 

REI has them for about the cost of the shipping charge you quote.  Between 7-12 dollars depending on size (obviously even more expensive ones when you go to even more bigger containers i.e > 1 liter).  I think for skiing, unless you are skiing big outback mountains, the smaller size ones are fine, since you can always refill them at the base lodge or on mountain lodge.  Been using one for the last 5-6 years.  Still in excellent useable non-smelly condition.

 

Think snow,

 

CP

post #11 of 27

Go with a camelback.  no need to screw around with taking a water bottle in and out of jacket.  No worries of dropping it on the chair lift.  You can stop in the middle of a run, quickly take a sip and keep going.  Also, you can get a camelback that has some additional room for storing things like lunch, snacks, first aid, extra gloves, etc.

post #12 of 27

This

 

 

nalgene.jpg

 

 

goes in the pocket of this

patagonia_ascensionist_jacket_black_fr.jpg

 

 

Simple....rolleyes.gif

post #13 of 27

Another vote for:

perry-the-platypus.jpg

post #14 of 27

I usually carry 2-4 Capri Sun pouches and put them in cargo pockets in my jacket and pants legs. They aren't reusable but I really appreciate the little sugar boost I get from them. Also, I still fall quite often and I haven't had one break on me yet. I also make sure to take a break and hydrate at the lodge so I don't use them up unnecessarily.

post #15 of 27

I guess we've come a long way since the Martini-tree days. Not sure if we're headed in the right direction.

post #16 of 27

When I ski in Colorado, I carry a small water bottle fearing dehydration if I don't . Problem with me staying hydrated is mandatory bathroom breaks every couple of hours which I hate! If there was a quiz where all the bathrooms are on Vail Mountain, I'm afraid to admit I'd ace it. Would rather know where all the powder stashes are!

post #17 of 27

I started skiing with a small Dakine Heli pack with a 1 liter bladder. I don't notice the pack, but it still lets me carry a few comfort items on the hill with me.

post #18 of 27

I ski with a winter camel bak and although it's not perfect (water still freezes even if I blow it back), it works well enough for me.

post #19 of 27

I've been going the CamelBak route myself.  They make a bunch of small packs that pack a couple liters of water and enough room for lunch, an extra layer, spare gloves, etc. without being too bulky.  They sell a few that are ski-specific -- you can also get the hose insulation kit separately and add it to any pack that has a hydration bladder.  (Although the ski-specific ones have zippered pockets to keep the hose out of the way, which is nice.)

 

The Platypus bottles are very popular these days, and cheap.  I feel like a liter of water in one of my jacket pockets might throw me off, though.  With a pack the weight is much more evenly distributed, and on your shoulders.

 

Wouldn't recommend a Nalgene or other hard water bottle.  Those things *will* hurt if you fall on them.  A lot.

post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns View Post

When I ski in Colorado, I carry a small water bottle fearing dehydration if I don't . Problem with me staying hydrated is mandatory bathroom breaks every couple of hours which I hate! If there was a quiz where all the bathrooms are on Vail Mountain, I'm afraid to admit I'd ace it. Would rather know where all the powder stashes are!

 


 

 

I too know where all the bathrooms are. Anywhere there is a tree

post #21 of 27



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

I started skiing with a small Dakine Heli pack with a 1 liter bladder. I don't notice the pack, but it still lets me carry a few comfort items on the hill with me.



 I was looking at these packs also. Do they come with a water bladder and hose? Or do you have to buy one and add it on? Which model do you have? I was looking at the 660ci model I believe

post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TFull View Post



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

I started skiing with a small Dakine Heli pack with a 1 liter bladder. I don't notice the pack, but it still lets me carry a few comfort items on the hill with me.



 I was looking at these packs also. Do they come with a water bladder and hose? Or do you have to buy one and add it on? Which model do you have? I was looking at the 660ci model I believe

Thats the one I use. I added a 1liter camelback reservoir with an insulated hose. I love the fit, it's not oversized or ungainly. I'm really happy with it.
 

post #23 of 27



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by TFull View Post



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

I started skiing with a small Dakine Heli pack with a 1 liter bladder. I don't notice the pack, but it still lets me carry a few comfort items on the hill with me.



 I was looking at these packs also. Do they come with a water bladder and hose? Or do you have to buy one and add it on? Which model do you have? I was looking at the 660ci model I believe

Thats the one I use. I added a 1liter camelback reservoir with an insulated hose. I love the fit, it's not oversized or ungainly. I'm really happy with it.
 



 Nice I found this one http://www.amazon.com/High-Sierra-Splash-70-Pack/dp/B000G0179C/ref=pd_sbs_sg_27   for 40 bucks? Looks like the dakine is almost 100 bills after ordering the reservoir. I do not mind spending the extra bucks as long as it as good as everyone says. Also it looks like the resrvoirs do not come with bite valves, do I need one? How does it work otherwise? Sorry for all the questions and thanks for the help


Edited by TFull - 12/15/10 at 2:40pm
post #24 of 27

Hubby carries a camelback that we both share on the lift. They are great because they hold so much water, which is rather important up on the hill. It's easy to get really dehydrated while skiing.

post #25 of 27

 

 i strap one to my upper thigh and watch the women flock to me for apres ski. biggrin.gif

 

(sorry, couldnt help myself. i think i spent too much time on TGR today.) 

post #26 of 27

Camelbak Omega Reservoir in my Heli Pro.  Everyone knows that if you don't have a backpack on while skiing you're not COOL.

post #27 of 27

Camel back packs are the best choice

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