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Skiing Alta?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

  I am new here. I have skiied all my life and wasn't really into it and did it like 3 times a season. I mostly motocross but now that it is Winter I can't so I decided this winter instead of sitting on my bum waiting for winter to be over I would ski. I bought a season pass to Alta ski resort and have been going there. I will try to describe my skill level, I do the few tame black runs at alta and go on not groomed runs occaisonaly. I my powder skiing capabilities is like that of a beginner hard pack skier. I have only gone in powder a few times and the times I went in I crashed. Any tips for skiing powder?  I have some rossignol viper x1 skis which are beginner skis. They are about 1 inch below my chin when they are upright. I can turn parralel on groomed runs also.

 

I have a question though:

 

- What is some advice for skiing in snow not groomed or powder? It looks way fun for the poeple who are good at it. (we got 11 inches of snow last night)

 

- I try to lean forward as much as I can because I can turn better but how important is it that I keep my skis really close together?

 

- I am headin back up tommorow and was wondering if I should try going into some black diamond powder?

 

-could my skis be keeping me from improving or is it just my skill level?

 

 

 

Thanks for the advice!

 

 

post #2 of 25


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarluver View Post

Hi,

 

  I am new here. I have skiied all my life and wasn't really into it and did it like 3 times a season. I mostly motocross but now that it is Winter I can't so I decided this winter instead of sitting on my bum waiting for winter to be over I would ski. I bought a season pass to Alta ski resort and have been going there. I will try to describe my skill level, I do the few tame black runs at alta and go on not groomed runs occaisonaly. I my powder skiing capabilities is like that of a beginner hard pack skier. I have only gone in powder a few times and the times I went in I crashed. Any tips for skiing powder?  I have some rossignol viper x1 skis which are beginner skis. They are about 1 inch below my chin when they are upright. I can turn parralel on groomed runs also.

 

I have a question though:

 

- What is some advice for skiing in snow not groomed or powder? It looks way fun for the poeple who are good at it. (we got 11 inches of snow last night)

 

- I try to lean forward as much as I can because I can turn better but how important is it that I keep my skis really close together?

 

- I am headin back up tommorow and was wondering if I should try going into some black diamond powder?

 

-could my skis be keeping me from improving or is it just my skill level?

 

 

 

Thanks for the advice!

 

 



1st your skis absolute suck at skiing powder. but I doubt they are holding you back that much.

 

2nd you skis dont need to be super close together and you should never strive have them touching. Where ever your feet fall naturally is where you want them to be.

 

3rd sure why not

 

4 chicken and the egg. What ever is not letting you ski powder would be apparent to any good instructor watching you skis couple turn on anything on even a groomed run. Your skis are doing you any favors for powder skiing but they could work if you were a better skier.

 

my best advice is take a lesson and find out whats happening.
 

post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 

Well, I will be honest today was the first time I actually went into 100% powder. other times I was just skiing runs that arent groomed.

 

I actually crashed because it is like night and day difference from that and groomed. Any advice for going back into some powder tommorow?

 

post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarluver View Post


Well, I will be honest today was the first time I actually went into 100% powder. other times I was just skiing runs that arent groomed.



I actually crashed because it is like night and day difference from that and groomed. Any advice for going back into some powder tommorow?



 






Yep, it is called practice, practice, practice. And stay out of the backseat.
post #5 of 25

ya, take a lesson.

 

If you want tips on how to ski powder search here, this has been asked and answered a dozen times this season.

 

Also make sure your boots fit properly, e.g. feel like a firm handshake but not causing pain / rubbing. You could have a boot fitter evaluate your fit in your boots. They will probably try to sell you aftermarket footbeds / insoles, generally they are  worth it.

post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarluver View Post

Well, I will be honest today was the first time I actually went into 100% powder. other times I was just skiing runs that arent groomed.

 

I actually crashed because it is like night and day difference from that and groomed. Any advice for going back into some powder tommorow?

 


Keep your speed up.

 

A lot of beginners struggle with powder because they lack the confidence to really get going. Making low speed turns in powder can be really challenging, especially on skinny skis. Point em foward for a bit before you get into a turning rhythm.
 

post #7 of 25

Definitely take a lesson -- that will jump start you in the right direction.  Or hook up with someone who you can watch and follow around (my wife followed me around on a powder day at Alta last year and picked it up pretty quickly, and I purposely kept my mouth shut unless she asked a specific question).  There are too many details to try and describe over the internet and we'd make it harder than it needs to be if we try to "pre-load" you with suggestions.  In reality, it's simple -- with enough speed and good fore/aft balance, you end up floating through the snow and it all feels right.

post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 

Ok. also, I feel like when I am skiing on slightly steeper runs I feel more like I am skidding side ways in my turns and less like I am carving.  I feel like when I try to carve I build up too much speed.

 

Is this a problem?

 

And anyone who skis at alta. what run should I try tommorow and where is it at? I tryed to explain my skill level in the first post so base it off that. Thanks

post #9 of 25

Take advantage of your lift rides and study the better skis.  Carefully watch how they use their poles and what their legs are doing.  Then do the same yourself.  Ski as many runs as you can each day and get your moneys worth out of that seasons pass.  There is only so much you can improve during a time period, much of your improvement will occur naturally as you put in time on the slopes through the season.  You need someone to watch your technique and advise you.  A lesson, even a group lesson, would be a good investment.  Also, hopefully your skiing companions are advanced skiers, they can also watch your technique and advise you, but then you have the possibility of getting bad advice.(but not always)

post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 

Ok I'll look into a lesson.

 

 

One more thing though, my boots are size 24 and my foot is a size 25.5 and I don't really mind wearing them but when I at all get into the back seat like off of a jump for example my toe kills because it presses hard on the front. Should I try to use these boots one more season or see if I can get some for christmas? If I got new boots I would probably get new skis as well and my skis have the comp J bindings. I could just transfer these to new skis right? How tall should the skis be relative to my height and what are some good cheap skis I should get?

 

I just don't really know how much of a difference new skis would make and if they are even worth it. Like I said I am skiing on beginner groomed runs skis.

post #11 of 25

The fishing seems to be very good for this time of year.

post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

The fishing seems to be very good for this time of year.


I kinda thought the same thing, either that or sugarluver is just a young grom.

post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 

No, I am serious. I wouldn't just come here to waiste mine and yours time and thinking I am getting something out of it. I was asking about the boot thing because the people at the ski shop said my boots fit perfectly fine even though it says 25.5 on the foot measurer. After a long day of skiing my big toes are very tender and sore.

 

I went into a run called baldy chutes today at Alta because I figured if I crash the worst that could happen is I get cold. It felt really wierd skiing non-groomed snow and the snow just wants to pull my ski's away from me. I am 5' 3 right now and growing and I have 140 cm skis. (is this a good fit?) that are very narrow and are beginner skis.

 

Since I am somewhat new to this skiing business, how much better would I be able to ski with longer, wider skis? I like doing both (well I want to get good at) powder and hardpack.

 

It kind of feels like I am not improving with these skis and they are sort of restricting me.

 

 

Please don't think I am fishing, I am just looking for help and I wanted to come here to ask.

post #14 of 25

If the boot fitters said that your boots fit, they are probably right.  I wear a size 11.5/12 shoe, but I'm in a 27.5 boot.  You don't want any slop in your boot.  Do you need new skis?  Hell, I don't know, but if you are going to ski Alta all year, I wouldn't want to do it on skinny skis.  If I were you, I'd snag a pair of mid fats (85ish mm underfoot), but I wouldn't go too long.  I know someone else said this, but seriously- take a lesson.  The instructors at Alta are great. 

post #15 of 25

Did you say 'baldy chutes'?

 

Looks alot like a fishing pole to me.

post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

Did you say 'baldy chutes'?

 

Looks alot like a fishing pole to me.



 

post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 

Cool. I'll nag my parents for a lesson at Alta!

 

 

King Grump, perfect name for you man. At alta right off of Collins there are some gates that say Baldy chutes forward. I went in there and dropped down half way through the traverse into I think it was Ballroom? (am I right?)

 

I don't really mind wearing my boots (it isn't hell or anything) but my toes do get a little soar by the end of the day. At ski n see they said my boots are fitted for a race fit since I am wearing boots 1 and a half size smaller than what my feet fit into. I think it is a good reminder to stay out of the back seat because it hurts my toes to lean back.

 

- There are many runs I have yet to try and I would like to know some good ones that aren't too gnarly. Which runs and where are they at? (alta of course) 

post #18 of 25

A good bootfitter can get you more toe room in your present boots pretty easily.  You are right though, it is a good deterrent to stay out of the back seat.

JF

post #19 of 25



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarluver View Post

Cool. I'll nag my parents for a lesson at Alta!

 

 

King Grump, perfect name for you man. At alta right off of Collins there are some gates that say Baldy chutes forward. I went in there and dropped down half way through the traverse into I think it was Ballroom? (am I right?)

 

I don't really mind wearing my boots (it isn't hell or anything) but my toes do get a little soar by the end of the day. At ski n see they said my boots are fitted for a race fit since I am wearing boots 1 and a half size smaller than what my feet fit into. I think it is a good reminder to stay out of the back seat because it hurts my toes to lean back.

 

- There are many runs I have yet to try and I would like to know some good ones that aren't too gnarly. Which runs and where are they at? (alta of course) 


You skied ballroom and not baldy chutes, completely different creatures - check the map. Baldy chutes requires a bit more work. Look up hill when you are traversing into ballroom. If you skied baldy chutes as you first stated in post #13 you would definitely remember them in more ways than one. Can only hear what you say.  

 

Lessons sounds like order of the day.   

 

4ster is right about the extra toe room. Also make sure you are all the way back in the heel. Sometime grinding out a deeper heel pocket will give you more toe room. Work with a good boot fitter for the best results, 

 

Good luck with your lessons and boot work.
 

post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 

Ok I will take my boots in again.

 

But what do you think about these skis? http://www.levelninesports.com/Head-Mojo-Mix-Twin-Tip-Ski-Yellowred 

 

They only have the 154 cm size which would be about to my upper nose/eye level. What would be a good binding for these (from level nine)

post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 

What runs are good at Alta that you reccomend I do? (people who have skiied Alta).  I have been doing the run that if you go straight down from the top of sugar loaf, the ungroomed area that is right under the lift. So down the slope instead of making the turn right away from the lift chairs, go straight through those gates that say "entering expert terrain". I like the idea of exploring but the last thing I want to do is get myself into a run that is too much for me. So if you could tell me some runs you think I could do that aren't groomed but that aren't too hard but not too easy?

 

 

Thanks!

post #22 of 25

I recommend herring, mossbunker and squid.

post #23 of 25

trying bowling, it's awesome!

post #24 of 25



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarluver View Post

What runs are good at Alta that you reccomend I do? (people who have skiied Alta).  I have been doing the run that if you go straight down from the top of sugar loaf, the ungroomed area that is right under the lift. So down the slope instead of making the turn right away from the lift chairs, go straight through those gates that say "entering expert terrain". I like the idea of exploring but the last thing I want to do is get myself into a run that is too much for me. So if you could tell me some runs you think I could do that aren't groomed but that aren't too hard but not too easy?

 

 

Thanks!

 

Ride the Collins Chair to the top.  Turn around and ski the run under the chair briefly until you get to the traverse heading off to the right (High Traverse).  Take that until you see something headed down (to the left) that looks good to you and before you get to the end of the ridge (or near the end of the ridge) that crosses to the other side of the mountain.  Not too hard--not too easy.



 

post #25 of 25

My advice. Rent some fat skis and have a play, see how they feel. Use them in any soft snow and get used to them. You'll find them more stable and your confidence in soft stuff will increase.

 

Then, book a lesson. There is an instructor at Alta who is very good indeed, JW I think his name is. I skiied a day with him in horrific deep fresh spring stuff, that had been baking all week after it fell (Alta in late spring opens weekends only), and had about 6 inches of styrofoam over rotted fresh.  We were skiing over some area, Miner's Daughter or somesuch, and he had heaps of good tactics to try. I'd been teaching all season at Snowbird and this snow was gnarly!

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