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Peg ski bikes now banned at Copper Mountain

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

After allowing them for many years Copper Mountain's new management has decided to ban peg ski bikes for very unclear reasons.  They said for "safety reasons".   Currently, Winter Park Resort, Arapahoe Basin, Aspen/Snowmass, Buttermilk, Telluride, Keystone, and Durango Mountain Resort allow peg ski bikes.

 

Progressive ski industry giants in Colorado allow peg ski bikes but not Copper??????  In my eyes this destroys their credibility as a hangout for freestyle people.   If they are so concerned for safety why do they have terrain parks or host the Grand Prix?  Plenty of opportunity there for people to get hurt.  Peg ski bikes have never been involved in an accident at Copper that I know of.

 

Call or write management if you agree or disagree with this new policy.

 

In the meantime it looks like I will only be patronizing Colorado ski resorts that allow peg ski bikes (barring extenuating circumstances).

 

This is now banned at Copper Mountain:

 

 

post #2 of 6

That really sucks.  I would think that ski bikes are a pretty good way for slightly handicapped people to enjoy the slopes and be self sufficient, without having to depend on others to help them around. 

 

They still allow SitSkis, correct?rolleyes.gif  But, folks with those usually require help with them loading, unloading, traversing flats, etc..    A ski bike allows folks missing a limb or with a bum wheel to get a round pretty much on their ownwink.gif

 

Try working that angle and see if they allow them back. 

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

I'm starting to feel like a real old school snowboarder again.  I've been banned before.  Look where snowboarding is now.  We will win this!

 

At the end of last season I went ski biking at A-Basin after Winter Park shut down.  At the end of the day a former A-Basin employee ran up to me.  She started asking all sorts of questions about the bike.  She was asking for her husband.  He was injured two years ago while ski patrolling at Keystone.  A long-time Keystone patroller.  The injury was pretty horrific and it is now impossible to get his foot into a ski boot due to a fused ankle.  After a lifetime of skiing - banishment from the slopes.  The ski bobs require getting feet into ski boots in order to attach foot skis.

 

Sheila and I got Jim to come down from the upper A-Basin deck and check out the bike.  He was wearing some winter boots.  I got him to stand on the bike - no ankle pain.  I told him we're gonna have a lesson right now.  We walked up the slope a little ways. (The lifts were shut down-no traffic).  I explained the bike, bike stance, and the carry-over physics from skiing.  He was incredibly quick to pick things up.  In two short runs he was making linked turns and stopping under control.  He was just so happy - I can't explain his joy.  He thought he was never going to be on the slopes again.  This was his only ticket.   I explained about the ski bike licensing and mandatory lessons at Winter Park.  He completely agreed with that and went to say he thought that should be required of all skiers and snowboarders too.

 

Copper's policy is threatening to take away the ski slopes from people like Jim.  How DARE they!!!!! 


Edited by daysailer1 - 12/10/10 at 12:56pm
post #4 of 6


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

That really sucks.  I would think that ski bikes are a pretty good way for slightly handicapped people to enjoy the slopes and be self sufficient, without having to depend on others to help them around. 

 

They still allow SitSkis, correct?rolleyes.gif  But, folks with those usually require help with them loading, unloading, traversing flats, etc..    A ski bike allows folks missing a limb or with a bum wheel to get a round pretty much on their ownwink.gif

 

Try working that angle and see if they allow them back. 



The angle to use is a reference to the ADA for reasonable accommodations.  The equipment is no more dangerous than any other piece of equipment.  As with all types of snow sports, it is the operator that must be held accountable, not the equipment.

post #5 of 6

Trying to  come up with a PC pleading just like every other special interest group in America may not be the way to go.  Particularly when adaptive snowsports haven't really been the driving force for the activity, and when very few of the participants have adaptive needs. 

 

BMX has encountered some similar resistance re: skatepark access.  (And yes, skaters, though a number snowboard, have actively tried to keep bikes out of parks in many cases.)  And obviously MTB and moto in terms of accessing all sorts of areas.  Something tells me that a number of the riders affected by Copper's policy also ride bmx and/or park MTB setups, motos, etc. and are used to some of the access process.  That may be a better way to go. 

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

I have a feeling there is a many pronged approach to this.  Some of it is just trying to educate people and alter their perceptions.  I've run across people who think it's okay for skiers & boarders to be in the air but think bikes belong on the ground.  I had further input yesterday but I am unable to share that input. 

 

As far as ADA, Winter Park has used foot ski and a type of peg ski bike for many years at the National Sports Center for the Disabled.  Vail, Breckenridge, Loveland and a number of ski resorts ban ski bikes altogether (I heard first hand that VR is reviewing this policy).  Under ADA however they cannot bar people with doctors prescriptions/assesments that this is the only way they can use the slopes.  They are allowed at all ski resorts or someone is going to have a lawsuit on their hands.  Copper specifically wrote that they are banning "foot traffic" for "safety" which was their way of getting rid of the bikes.  As they run a summer mountain bike and hiking program using their charilifts - this doesn't really smell kosher to me.   Their lifts are "unsafe" to foot traffic in the winter and "safe" in summer to foot traffic?  It was proposed that bikers wear foot skis while on the lifts and then take them off once off the lift.  They said "no".  So it looks like their policy may run afoul of ADA if they don't allow peg bikes for the disabled.  So then, how can disabled people foot traffic be safe on the lift and non-disabled foot traffic be unsafe.   Looks like a conundrum.

 

It is probably going to take mobilizing the active Colorado downhill mountain bike and BMX communities to change things.  Many ski resorts here have summer DH programs that have bike parks with features.  They spin around, flip, and jump on those bikes at these ski resorts.

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