EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What Ski Length is appropriate?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What Ski Length is appropriate?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Hello I'm new to the forum. First post.

 

I just bought some new skis, Volkl AC30's, 177 length.

 

I'm 26, a big guy 6'4", 300+ lbs and a type II skier. I've been skiing for 13 years. I do my skiing in the northeast (Holiday Valley in ellicotville, NY, mostly), cruising around all sorts of trails. No moguls, no jumping, no racing (although sometimes I like to push myself on the black diamonds to see how fast I can go).

 

I bought these skis at the recommendation of the salesperson, and I got the longest length they had available (they had to ship a pair over from a nearby store because they didn't have this length in stock).

 

After bringing them home (geez, why didn't I do this before...) I checked Volkl's website and found they also sell a 184 length AC30.

 

Well, after doing some research around online (again geez, why didn't I do this before), I'm freaking out a bit thinking that I should really have the 184's and I'm wondering if I should try to return the 177's to the store and try to get them to get me the 184's instead. I paid a lot for these skis and don't plan on replacing them for at least 10 years, so I don't want to have this regret hanging over me that I bought the wrong skiis.

 

Would the extra 7cm or lack of really make any noticeable difference to me?

 

 

P.S. My previous skis were Solomon Pro Links sort of like a blue/purplish color. They were longer, maybe 190's but I don't know for sure. I'm at work so I'll have to check when I get home. Bought them at a swap for $75 bucks 10 years ago and I haven't had any complaints with them. They're a narrow ski with some, but not a lot of shape to them. A lot different from the new skis, so either way I'll have to get used to a new style of ski, regardless of the length.

 

I'm replacing them because I bought new boots that actually fit my feet better (my previous boots were a smidge too small and hurt my feet), but my new boots wouldn't fit in my old bindings, and the shops won't touch the bindings because they're too old. So it was either mount new bindings onto 15yo skis, or just get new equipment which I'm long overdue for anyways.

 

Thanks for the help!

post #2 of 24
Thread Starter 

Just realized my post might be tl;dr, so here's the summary:

 

Volkl AC30's 177 length purchased, should I return for 184 length, or would I not notice any difference?

 

I'm 26, a big guy 6'4", 300+ lbs and a type II skier. I've been skiing for 13 years. I do my skiing in the northeast (Holiday Valley in ellicotville, NY, mostly), cruising around all sorts of trails. No moguls, no jumping, no racing (although sometimes I like to push myself on the black diamonds to see how fast I can go). I also sometimes head into the glades.

 

Thanks again.

post #3 of 24

Take them back as they are way too short.

post #4 of 24

Definitely go for the longer skis.

 

Something to be aware of as you switch from your mostly straight carvers to the more shaped skis: watch your knees and consider taking a lesson. A lot of knee injuries occur with people switching from straight to shaped skis. It doesn't sound like you'll be skiing too fast, but you'll want to get used to skiing on shaped skis in order to save your knees.

post #5 of 24

I'm gonna dissent and say that if you're happy with them at 177, you might not want to step up to the 184.  Shaped front-side or 'all-mountain' skis that are that long can be a lot to handle.  They'll deal better with very high speeds, but they'll also be more sluggish to turn.  If you're not doing anything super-demanding, you are unlikely to push the 177s to their limits.

 

That said, you're a pretty big guy, so you could probably get away with the 184s.

 

And actually, looking at your post again, it's unclear if you even demoed the 177s.  IMO, the gap between your old skis and either of the new ones is going to be a lot bigger than between the 177s and the 184s of the same model.

 

edit: fixed comment implying 184s are taller than you.  Math is hard.

post #6 of 24

Another vote for keeping what you have, the 177. Volkl makes very substantial, stiff skis and the 177 will give you what's needed in eastern conditions for the skiing you described. Modern shaped skis are  quite different from what you have skied and older concepts about big people needing the biggest skis have less meaning. A plus for the 177 is that it will turn a little quicker because the turning radius is tighter (18.8 vs 20 ). The AC30 is considered an all-mountain cruiser and you can check out the reviews in the Epic Gear section.

 

Enjoy it! But should you choose the longer ski, it should not be much different.

 

 

post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DSloan View Post

Definitely go for the longer skis.

 

Something to be aware of as you switch from your mostly straight carvers to the more shaped skis: watch your knees and consider taking a lesson. A lot of knee injuries occur with people switching from straight to shaped skis. It doesn't sound like you'll be skiing too fast, but you'll want to get used to skiing on shaped skis in order to save your knees.

 

Thats for the warnings. What are some of the differences I should be looking out for? I started out on shaped skis when I learned to ski (rentals), but the skis I'm replacing were pretty much just picked because they were economical. And they're not entirely straight, they're just not aggressively shaped either. I'll definitely take it easy on them until I'm used to them.

 

And, I mean, what is considered too fast? Fast for me might not be that fast in general. I mean, I don't really ski down the black diamonds without hitting the breaks in the turns and stopping a couple times before reaching the bottom, but I do sometimes try to go as fast as I dare to. Most of the time I'll probably just be weaving back and forth down the blue's/green's with my wife, but other times I'll just tuck and zip on down to the bottom. I mean, I guess I'm just trying to say I think I'm a pretty decent skier for the places I ski and the way I ski, but I'm probably not very decent compared to racers or those who ski the big mountains out west. Ya know what I'm saying?

 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

I'm gonna dissent and say that if you're happy with them at 177, you might not want to step up to the 184.  Shaped front-side or 'all-mountain' skis that are that long can be a lot to handle.  They'll deal better with very high speeds, but they'll also be more sluggish to turn.  If you're not doing anything super-demanding, you are unlikely to push the 177s to their limits.

 

That said, you're a pretty big guy, so you could probably get away with the 184s.

 

And actually, looking at your post again, it's unclear if you even demoed the 177s.  IMO, the gap between your old skis and either of the new ones is going to be a lot bigger than between the 177s and the 184s of the same model.

 

edit: fixed comment implying 184s are taller than you.  Math is hard.


You're correct, I did not demo the skis. I really didn't do my research before heading to the store. But, I feel the skis I bought, aside from the length, are the right style for me.

 

I will contact the shop in a little bit and ask a couple questions:

 

1: is it possible to outright exchange them for the longer skis?

2: if I can try them out this weekend and then still have the option to exchange?

 

But what I'm really wondering now is, will I even notice a difference of 7cm between skis of the same model, either right from the start or 5-10 years from now? And, what would those differences be?

 

I mean, suppose I try them out this weekend (planning on it) and I don't dislike them. Am I going to be saying by the end of the season or in a couple years, "Gee I really wish I had those extra 7cm because of ___________________________"? 

 

Thanks for all the help I really appreciate it.

post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post

Another vote for keeping what you have, the 177. Volkl makes very substantial, stiff skis and the 177 will give you what's needed in eastern conditions for the skiing you described. Modern shaped skis are  quite different from what you have skied and older concepts about big people needing the biggest skis have less meaning. A plus for the 177 is that it will turn a little quicker because the turning radius is tighter (18.8 vs 20 ). The AC30 is considered an all-mountain cruiser and you can check out the reviews in the Epic Gear section.

 

Enjoy it! But should you choose the longer ski, it should not be much different.

 

 


Thanks for the comments! The last sentence is really what I'm hoping to be the case :)

 

I'll go track down the review - I am happy with the ski selection based on the description and other reviews I have read today, I just found out about the availability of the longer length and started to panic a little that I wouldn't be happy with what I have. The shop sort of implied that I was getting the longest ski available, and they even had to ship it over from another nearby shop.

 

If the difference is, with the 177 I'll turn a little sharper and lose a little potential top speed due to instability at very fast speeds, but I'm not getting close to top speed anyways so it doesn't matter, then I'm fine with it.

 

If the difference is with the 177 I'm going to feel like I'm on ice skates and potentially putting myself in a dangerous situation every time I head down a diamond, but with the 184 I'll feel like I'm on rails, then it worries me a little.
 

post #9 of 24

 

Quote:

Thats for the warnings. What are some of the differences I should be looking out for? I started out on shaped skis when I learned to ski (rentals), but the skis I'm replacing were pretty much just picked because they were economical. And they're not entirely straight, they're just not aggressively shaped either. I'll definitely take it easy on them until I'm used to them.

 

I believe the issues stem from the difference between having to take your full weight off of one ski, switch  it to the other, and bring your knees around in order to turn straight skis and having to roll your skis onto their edge and apply pressure in order to turn shaped skis. I'm not sure how shaped your old skis are or your technique, but because of the way shaped skis are made to turn I think the injuries result from unexpected turning that can accompany technique that doesn't match shaped skis. Just make sure you play with the turns before you go balls out down a black diamond to see how fast you can go. :-)

post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSloan View Post

 

Quote:

Thats for the warnings. What are some of the differences I should be looking out for? I started out on shaped skis when I learned to ski (rentals), but the skis I'm replacing were pretty much just picked because they were economical. And they're not entirely straight, they're just not aggressively shaped either. I'll definitely take it easy on them until I'm used to them.

 

I believe the issues stem from the difference between having to take your full weight off of one ski, switch  it to the other, and bring your knees around in order to turn straight skis and having to roll your skis onto their edge and apply pressure in order to turn shaped skis. I'm not sure how shaped your old skis are or your technique, but because of the way shaped skis are made to turn I think the injuries result from unexpected turning that can accompany technique that doesn't match shaped skis. Just make sure you play with the turns before you go balls out down a black diamond to see how fast you can go. :-)


ok thank you! this is good to know because that seems like a pretty accurate description of how I turn. I'm sure I don't have great technique. Maybe not even good technique. I was a self taught skier and just sort of figured out what worked for me. I tried one group lesson, which was pretty much an hour of me sitting in the snow because I flopped over and couldn't stand back up, and the instructor wouldn't let me take a ski off to stand back up :P After that, I sort of gave up on lessons.

 

So yeah, I'll definitely spend my first trip practicing and getting comfortable on the new skis, and learning the new turning technique.

post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 

OK, new day, new perspective.

 

First off, apologies for coming in and asking what must be the most common question on the boards here: ski length. I didn't realize it was such a worn out question with an "it depends" answer.

 

So, that said, I've used my head and came up with a few conclusions.

 

1) Its my mistake for rushing to the shop and buying skis, rather than demoing lots of different skis and figuring out what I actually like before buying. Right now I don't know what I'd like. I know what I have, and I'd recognize what I don't like when I found it, but I don't have a good reference point. Its a mistake I won't make again, and hopefully I won't be regretting my purchase and the skis I have will work out just fine.

 

2) Regarding the actual question - 177 or 184 of the same model - I've decided that while the longer would have probably been better for me, I probably wouldn't notice a 7mm difference. I'm just not that good/experienced. I mean, its only less than 3in on the overall length, or less than an inch and a half front and back. It might make a difference to an expert, but an expert I'm not. If I like the 177's, I doubt I would like the 184's any better. If I don't like the 177's, I'm not going to magically like the 184's just because they're a couple inches longer.

 

3) Either way is a change/improvement for me. The new skis at 177 are going to provide more surface area than my old skis at ~190 I think just because they're a lot wider, so if anything I might see an improvement in stability at all the conditions I typically ski.

 

4) Lets get real for a minute, I haven't skied more than a couple times a season since I graduated high school. There's no way I'm as good as I think I am. I have plans to make at least 10 trips this year on a once a week pass with my wife (she's just learning, complete beginner, and getting real lessons not from me), but who knows if we have a kid next year or the year after maybe I go back to being a couple times a season skier. The ski length reaches above my chin, but not quite to my nose, at least when I'm in socks on a hard floor. So its not obscenely short like shoulder length, it at least falls in the novice length according to standards. But the 184's wouldn't even get to eyebrow level once I'm standing in ski boots and thats the largest these skis are made.

 

tl;dr: I've decided the skis should do what I need them to do, and I'm going to stop worrying about it. When I go rip up the slopes this saturday, I'll probably see how silly all this worrying has really been, and all will be forgotten.

 

Thanks for all the help everyone I really appreciate it.

post #12 of 24

Enjoy the slopes!!! ski.gif

post #13 of 24

MARinhardt,

 

Totally agree with your most recent post. Just get on them and enjoy.

 

My first several hours on modern skis were a little confusing in that they were not the super skis I expected. After a day, I was all smiles. It takes a little while, but, you'll figure it out. Let us know how you like them.

post #14 of 24

You being on 177 AC30's makes me at 6'0 155 on 170 AC30's look somewhat foolish redface.gif

post #15 of 24

A very well know and respected ski shop offers this advice. "The bottom line is that you should ski the shortest size that you’re comfortable skiing fast on. Anything longer is just unnecessary extra effort, and using skis that are too big can force skiers to develop awkward technique to compensate. " When they say skiing fast they mean skiing fast for YOU, not what someone else considers fast. Some also say the bigger the hill the longer the ski since you may choose to make more turns on a shorter hill to get your money's worth.   As a Level II eastern skier you may be turning a little more than average and you probably do not be ski at speeds that are too great for the ski you bought. I think you've bought the length you will enjoy more this year than the 184. ENJOY.

post #16 of 24

I don't know about 177 cm skis for a guy your size. I'm a mere 5'9" 155 lbs and I ski 180 cm Atomic SX-11 Supercross. Oh - I'm also 49 years old so not exactly a rambunctious youngster. I find the 180 SX-11s incredibly easy to ski. Then again, I found a number of 205 cm straight skis that I used to ride really easy to ski. I can't imagine being 6'4" and wanting to ski on something as short as a 177. Those are more like skates or ballet skis for a guy your size. IMO you're asking a lot of 177 cm ski to give you decent edge control when you're 300 lbs. Unless you're not a very good skier I would recommend the 184s.

post #17 of 24
Have you had them on snow yet?

Any edging problems (do they flex away from setting an edge into the snow)?

Any speed wobble problems (at 25mph? at 30 mph? at 40 mph?)

Any "They feel slow and pokey in soft snow, like they get bogged down"- type problems?


#1 is something you want to make sure doesn't exist at low speeds because it would make that ski a bad learning ski for you.

If the ski is doing #2 at speed (25/30/40), you will notice that long before you notice #1 at the same speed.

PLEASE post a review of this ski in this size once you do have them on snow; very few reviewers are your size and your viewpoint is going to be way different than most.
Edited by comprex - 12/11/10 at 10:02am
post #18 of 24

 

Quote:
I can't imagine being 6'4" and wanting to ski on something as short as a 177.

 

I'm 6'6", 260.  I've been on 178cm Dynastar Contacts for 2 years, and just got new 175cm Progressor 9s -- and picked them explicitly instead of the 180s for better maneuverability.  (I had demoed them in a 175 and knew I liked them.)  Frankly, I can't imagine being on anything significantly bigger/stiffer as a daily driver, even in the East.  I've yet to hit a speed limit on the Progressors.  The AC30s the OP bought are no slouch in the stiffness department either.

 

Unless you're actually racing, or like going really fast and cranking GS turns all the time, most people do not need technical front-side skis taller than they are.  You can get stability at speed in other ways, like higher torsional stiffness and dampening.

post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

 

Quote:
I can't imagine being 6'4" and wanting to ski on something as short as a 177.

 

I'm 6'6", 260.  I've been on 178cm Dynastar Contacts for 2 years, and just got new 175cm Progressor 9s -- and picked them explicitly instead of the 180s for better maneuverability.  (I had demoed them in a 175 and knew I liked them.)  Frankly, I can't imagine being on anything significantly bigger/stiffer as a daily driver, even in the East.  I've yet to hit a speed limit on the Progressors.  The AC30s the OP bought are no slouch in the stiffness department either.

 

Unless you're actually racing, or like going really fast and cranking GS turns all the time, most people do not need technical front-side skis taller than they are.  You can get stability at speed in other ways, like higher torsional stiffness and dampening.



 

post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post


Have you had them on snow yet?

Any edging problems (do they flex away from setting an edge into the snow)?

Any speed wobble problems (at 25mph? at 30 mph? at 40 mph?)

Any "They feel slow and pokey in soft snow, like they get bogged down"- type problems?


#1 is something you want to make sure doesn't exist at low speeds because it would make that ski a bad learning ski for you.

If the ski is doing #2 at speed (25/30/40), you will notice that long before you notice #1 at the same speed.

PLEASE post a review of this ski in this size once you do have them on snow; very few reviewers are your size and your viewpoint is going to be way different than most.


 Alright update time!

 

I did go out skiing last saturday at Holiday Valley in Ellicotville, NY. I think I gave them (and myself!) a pretty good workout. For the most part, I don't feel like I ski them any differently than my previous skis, which are 190's Solomon Pro-Link 10-15 years old. There has been a lot of snow so far in december, and while there was little true ice, there was a lot of really hard packed snow with little to no powder on top, and lot of uneven frozen snow and icy snowballs all over the place. A lot of the lesser traveled trails had snow that wasn't quite as packed, but wasn't loose powder either, it was kinda frozen and clumpy. Those trails were a bit of a challenge for me to do anything on.

 

First couple runs were down the bunny hill for my wife, who is a new skier. I suffered an embarassing flop over trying to see just how much the skis do on their own. Turns out that just tipping them on edge and hoping they turn is not good enough :p. After that, I stopped thinking about it and just skied.

 

I abandoned my wife for a bit while she took a lesson and headed up the hill with my 16yo younger brother. Skied down a couple steeper blue squares and easier black diamonds getting used to them. Turns out that it was more me getting used to skiing again and regaining some confidence. After a few runs I got my confidence back and was starting to have fun.

 

Met back up with my wife again after her lesson. She was in pain and cramping up win her calves. She wanted to go up the hill anyways, and at the top, she found out she was in too much pain to ski down. She ended up getting a ride down on a toboggon, and I lose an hour or so running around for her, going to get her street shoes out of the car, taking her to the performance shop to get her boots checked, getting her situated in the lodge, etc. By the time I got back up on the hill and met up with my little bro again, I only had about an hour and a half left.

 

We made quite a few runs in the little time we had remaining. I didn't notice that I was able to make any sharper turns than my old skis, but I did feel that it took a little longer in transition from turning left to turning right, and vice versa. I attribute this to the width of the skis. I can't say if they hold edges well yet. I'm not entirely sure what it feels like to hold an edge, I don't think. I do a fair bit of braking in my turns especially on steeper slopes. I did find they don't slide and brake as nicely as my old skis. I attribute that to being new and freshly tuned, while my old skis were never tuned once in the 10 years I skied on them. A couple times I found myself panicking a little if I wanted to slow down just a little without stopping - the edges wanted to grab a little more than I wanted them to.

 

I didn't notice any speed "wobble" problems that I will attribute to just going fast. The snow was very hard and rough and that caused a bit of a rough ride when I got closer to my personal speed limit. I don't know the types of speeds I do ski. On the smoother snow, I felt comfortable and was getting a bit of air over some big rollers at the bottom of trails. On the steeper trails is where the snow was rougher, less groomed, and less skied, and coincidentally where I was more nervous when I picked up some speed. I know I have skied faster in the past, but I don't feel as if the skis were holding me back this trip - it was more my confidence and the conditions. Does that make sense?

 

Any "They feel slow and pokey in soft snow, like they get bogged down"- type problems? - I can't say I found any soft snow. I did mention a couple trails where the snow was not quite as packed down, but was not soft but hard and clumpy, like it was wet, and then started to freeze. On those trails, I didn't feel slow and pokey, but I had difficulty turning. The speed was fine, because I remember wanting to slow down but not being able to because I couldn't maneuver into a slide, the edges were holding too much I guess in the less packed snow. On the less steep groomed runs, I was able to carry plenty of speed. Remember how I said my wife was taken down in a toboggon? Well, I followed a ski patrol volunteer down to the first aid station and I was having a hard time NOT overtaking and passing the volunteer, even as he was making carving turns down the trail and I was staying in his tracks.

 

So all in all, I'm satisfied with the skis the first trip out. I skied nearly every open trail on the hill, was able to get my confidence back, and generally felt pretty comfortable on them by the end of the night. By the end of the night, my legs were burning, but thats just me being out of shape. I didn't suffer any major falls (other than the flop over :P) and I didn't feel like the skis were holding me back, but rather my confidence, abilities, and the conditions at times.

 

I hope this summary provides SOME useful information. I know its probably not very useful as a decent review, but I just don't know what I'm supposed to be looking for or feeling while I'm skiing, as far as comparing one ski to the next. I'm planning on taking them out again this saturday, so I'll be able to add some new information next week. Hopefully the conditions will be a little better, but I'm thinking it'll be about the same. I'm sure as I get used to the skis and skiing every week again, and getting my confidence and fitness back, by the end of the year I might be able to form a little better opinion of the ski apart from, they got me down the hill how I wanted to get there :P

 

I'll stay in touch. If you have anymore questions, I'll do my best to answer.

post #21 of 24

This reminds me of my father in law who started skiing at around age 40, and now is 62ish and won't take a lesson to save his life. He switched from circa 1996 K2s to Rossi zenith becsue he was due for new skis. Frankly, I think he skidded all his turns better on the older skis, but at least the new ones are shorter so he has less of a chance of crossing them.

post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAReinhardt View Post

I did go out skiing last saturday at Holiday Valley in Ellicotville, NY. I think I gave them (and myself!) a pretty good workout. For the most part, I don't feel like I ski them any differently than my previous skis, which are 190's Solomon Pro-Link 10-15 years old.

I feel you're probably right.
Quote:
I didn't notice that I was able to make any sharper turns than my old skis, but I did feel that it took a little longer in transition from turning left to turning right, and vice versa

It might take a change of style for you to get really tight turns out of these.
Quote:
A couple times I found myself panicking a little if I wanted to slow down just a little without stopping - the edges wanted to grab a little more than I wanted them to.

Sounds like they will make a great learning ski should you choose to go that route.
Quote:
The speed was fine, because I remember wanting to slow down but not being able to because I couldn't maneuver into a slide, the edges were holding too much I guess in the less packed snow.
Quote:
Well, I followed a ski patrol volunteer down to the first aid station and I was having a hard time NOT overtaking and passing the volunteer, even as he was making carving turns down the trail and I was staying in his tracks.

"Don't pass the ski instructor" is a fun game some of them play when they want you to carve deeper arcs.

Quote:
By the end of the night, my legs were burning, but thats just me being out of shape.

^This, combined with thisv:
Quote:
Turns out that just tipping them on edge and hoping they turn is not good enough

makes me wonder if your weight isn't a bit far back.
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the comments!

 

Trip #2 was last saturady. We were only there for a few hours, and it was mostly a learning evening for my wife. Most of the evening was me going back and forth at a crawling pace on the easy trails so my wife could follow me and build up some confidence. She's getting better making the big slow S turns on the easy trails, but she doesn't have a lot of confidence, and she has a hard time stopping when she wants to. A couple runs I left my wife at the bottom of the hill and me and my 2 younger brothers took on a couple more difficult trails.

 

1 of the trails was champagne, a black diamond groomed/packed/icy run. I concentrated on making smooth turns without intentionally hitting the brakes/skidding and losing speed. I felt really good the whole way down, but I didn't really feel like I ever got going too fast. At the bottom, my little brothers who followed me told me I looked really smooth and comfortable, and they thought I was going pretty fast. I don't know if I was really going as fast as they thought I was going, but I I still felt pretty good about the run. The other run we did was cindy's, a short and steeper blue square groomed/packed/icy run. It was the last run of the night, and it was pretty much a race down the hill. I hit the brakes a bit when I got a bit nervous with the speed I was going, but I never got out of control (and I did beat my little bros down the hill :p).

 

I've been thinking these skis wouldn't seem that good for a true beginner. I was having a hard time getting them to do what I wanted them to do at the speeds my wife was skiing. I could do it, but it was much easier to build up a little more speed and take a longer turn rather than the sharp back and forths across the hill my wife was doing.

 

After 2 trips, I've noticed I feel a lot more comfortable on the skis, and I've got most of my former confidence back that I had when I was skiing more regularly a few years ago. They are a fun ski that at least for me don't like to go too slow, and I don't know if I've hit a "too fast" point for the skis yet, but rather a too fast point where I chickened out. I didn't get the burn in my legs this week like I did after the first week, but we didn't ski as long, and I didn't do as much hard skiing either.

 

Trip #3 might be this saturday, and it might just be me and my little brothers. My wife wants to take a week off because she has a sore shoulder and her big toe is sore (toenail is about to fall off, actually) due to either the way her boot fit or a bunched up sock or something from last trip. So, I'll be able to get a better picture of how the skis feel after a few hours of skiing at my level.

post #24 of 24
smile.gificon14.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What Ski Length is appropriate?