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no luck with gloves

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I found out I stay pretty warm while skiing.

I don't want to go too thin, but it's hard to put on soaking wet gloves after lunch time. While my hands are comfortable in my nice ski gloves, they are also just sweating wayyy to much. 

 

I've wore some thinner gloves, and it works great, until you get snow up them, then your just in a bad mood. 

 

What are some people on here using who have trouble with warm hands or sweaty hands from skiing?

post #2 of 17

Sounds like you need several pair.  I have three - a light pair for warm days, a heavier pair for typical days, and a pair of down mittens for the those New England cold days.  Ones with Goretex that will allow msoiture to escape might help.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

My current set have gortex in them and thinsulate.(just probably too much)


I'd hate to give them up, because they are so damn comfy to wear, but they are useless after lunch, I guess if i had to pair, but then sweaty hands after pulling out of gloves are never comfortable. 

 

Any actual glove suggestions?

post #4 of 17

If you really love those gloves, then instead of replacing them, buying a second pair to put on after lunch might be the best bet. You know you'll like them and you'll always have a dry pair to put on. If you really want one pair for the full day I'm afraid I can't help as I have terrible circulation in my hands and need the warmest gloves possible. Perhaps you could get a goretex shell glove, and have a few pairs of liners? Goodluck

 

-Joe-

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thats not a bad idea Joe.

 

While I do love the gloves, they are a bit warm at times. 
I have poor circulation too, but when I ski, boy the blood is a flowin!

 

I bought the pair I have 2 years ago, It would be tough to find another pair of them, but it might be possible. 

 

I dont even know where they are at the moment. haha.

post #6 of 17

like you...my hands are warm.  i use a wool blend with thinsulate liner. IF they do get wet...I have a 2nd pair and when i eat lunch I change both  my socks and grab the other gloves. At night everything dries out (unlike the really thick gortex ones....my wifes gloves stay wet for days and i just cant talk her into using the ones like I have...oh well)

post #7 of 17

I have the same issue as you.  My hands sweat up after the first run!  I found it's best to buy the gloves that have a removable inner liner.  I pull it out and put it in my pack or pocket (doesn't take up much space).  Ski the first half of day with just the shells, which is thin, but keeps me warm.  Once the shells start getting soaked through and my hands start getting cold, I put the liners back in the gloves and I'm back to being completely dry again.  This will hold me over til I'm done skiing.  Then it's just making sure I dry them when I get home.  For skiing multiple days in a row, I make sure I have multiple pairs so I switch back and forth and never start a day with slightly damp gloves.

post #8 of 17

Try some Swany gloves with the Dryfinger II insert. Seems to wick the sweat away enough for me.

 

I think its the SX Crossover line.

post #9 of 17

If you hands are sweating you are probabbly dressed too warm AND the gloves are not breathable enough. 

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tendofreak View Post

like you...my hands are warm.  i use a wool blend with thinsulate liner. IF they do get wet...I have a 2nd pair and when i eat lunch I change both  my socks and grab the other gloves. At night everything dries out (unlike the really thick gortex ones....my wifes gloves stay wet for days and i just cant talk her into using the ones like I have...oh well)


Wow, a wool outer, not a wool inner? 
Wool liner sounds like a good plan with maybe a gortex outer. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spknmike View Post

Try some Swany gloves with the Dryfinger II insert. Seems to wick the sweat away enough for me.

 

I think its the SX Crossover line.

Thanks for the suggestion!


    Quote:

Originally Posted by majortato View Post

I have the same issue as you.  My hands sweat up after the first run!  I found it's best to buy the gloves that have a removable inner liner.  I pull it out and put it in my pack or pocket (doesn't take up much space).  Ski the first half of day with just the shells, which is thin, but keeps me warm.  Once the shells start getting soaked through and my hands start getting cold, I put the liners back in the gloves and I'm back to being completely dry again.  This will hold me over til I'm done skiing.  Then it's just making sure I dry them when I get home.  For skiing multiple days in a row, I make sure I have multiple pairs so I switch back and forth and never start a day with slightly damp gloves.

 

 

Another neat idea. Thanks!
While I don't really like my hands sweating, I really dont like them cold either. 
That happy medium is just so hard to find. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

If you hands are sweating you are probabbly dressed too warm AND the gloves are not breathable enough. 


I'm wearing about the least amount of clothing I can while skiing.

Long underwear and a thermal top with a wool shirt. Pants and ski jacket. 

Any less than that and I get cold. 


Your right though, the gloves are probably not breathable enough.


The thing that irritates me about the gloves though, is if I use them for something other than skiing, my hands get cold. =(
 

post #11 of 17

What gloves do you have now? 

 

One other thing, I don't know what level of skier you are... but in general if you improve your technique and get better your skiing becomes more efficent and you don't get as hot.

post #12 of 17

problem with ppl with sweaty hands is no glove is breathable enough...except the type that doesn't keep your hands warm.  Even when I do any light activity, sweat starts pouring from my hands.

 

Also, I don't believe in spending too much money buying crazy high tech gloves.  My gloves get dirty and smelly over time and washing them doesn't really help.  They seem to wear out after about 1 yr of heavy use.  No point spending tons of money on new gloves every year.

post #13 of 17

This is the answer to sweaty and/or cold hands.  Buy super-thin, wicking material glove liners.  And mittens.  When your hands sweat, the liners wick moisture away, into the insulation of your mittens.  At lunchtime, the liners should dry out immediately.  After lunch, you put the dry liners on and then stick your hands into your probably still wet mittens.  Except you can't feel that they're wet, because you've got the liners on. 

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

The unfortunate part of my current gloves is that they fit just right that I couldn't put a liner in them.

 

It looks like I'll have to go for some other solution all around.

 

I have big hands and long fingers, but the other part is, my fingers are not big and fat, they are long and slender. Which makes finding things that fit good hard. 

 

I just get warm from doing any sports activity. I push myself every time I go down the hill. Using poles to turn and such really gets your arms working and such as well.

 

I almost used a pair of construction gloves one day. Rubber palms and cotton backs, So glad I didn't. I remember ice freezing on my face that day. haha.

 

I'll have to find my gloves, they are packed away in ski stuff. 
Need Boots first, but figured I'd keep my eye out on gloves and see what others were doing with my issues. 

post #15 of 17

Ideas...

 

Soft shell gloves will be more breathable than hardshell / laminate / goretex gloves. You can probably find something that is going to not be too cold.

 

"Sweating is controlled from a center in the preoptic and anterior regions of the brain's hypothalamus, where thermosensitive neurons are located. The heat-regulatory function of the hypothalamus is also affected by inputs from temperature receptors in the skin. High skin temperature reduces the hypothalamic set point for sweating and increases the gain of the hypothalamic feedback system in response to variations in core temperature. Overall, however, the sweating response to a rise in hypothalamic ('core') temperature is much larger than the response to the same increase in average skin temperature. The process of sweating decreases core temperature, whereas the process of evaporation decreases surface temperature.

 

There are two situations in which our nerves will stimulate sweat glands, making us sweat: during physical heat and emotional stress. In general, emotionally induced sweating is restricted to palms, soles, armpits, and sometimes the forehead, while physical heat-induced sweating occurs throughout the body." --Wikipedia

 

The fact thay you are sweating implies that you really are too hot, not too cold. Unless you are sweating because you are nervous. Open your jacket when you are doing a run, then zip up on the chair.

 

If you just have some sort of over active sweat glands in the hand, you could try spray on antiperspirant.

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post

This is the answer to sweaty and/or cold hands.  Buy super-thin, wicking material glove liners.  And mittens.  When your hands sweat, the liners wick moisture away, into the insulation of your mittens.  At lunchtime, the liners should dry out immediately.  After lunch, you put the dry liners on and then stick your hands into your probably still wet mittens.  Except you can't feel that they're wet, because you've got the liners on. 



By super thin, wicking material, do you mean similar to technical base layer stuff like a lot of the under armor stuff?  I think this would be great....problem is I have never ran across them.  If you have a brand, please let me know, I'd be interested.  I think with that solution and even gloves would work great.  My experience with mittens is even if you soak them through, they still stay warm...so that's definitely a solution.  For some reason, I just don't like the look of them.

post #17 of 17

I've got a pair of Grandoe Switch gloves and I LOVE THEM.  It's kind of hard to explain, but there's an insulated glove back, a non-insulated palm, and then an insulated middle layer.  On warm days, you put your hand in so that both insulated layers are on the back of your hand.  There's only the uninsulated palm layer over the inside of your hand  = cooler hands.  On cold days, you put your hand in between the insulated layers.  That way, both the uninsulated palm layer AND the interior insulation layer are on your palm, and your hand is completely surrounded by insulation.

 

On REALLY cold Minnesota days, I'll wear a pair of Patagonia Capilene glove liners as well.  I've been out below -20 F with that setup without too much trouble.

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