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Volkl AC-50 - Advanced Boots?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I recently purchased the Volkl Ac-50 and was at the ski shop to prepare my skis for the new season.  I had demoed the skiis previously season with my older boots (entry-level) and the ski service director advised me against using my old boots due to the low cuff and softness of the boot.  He said due to the advanced nature of the ski, it would not be safe to use the skiis with my old boots.

 

He recommended an advanced and stiffer boot with a higher cuff. When I demoed the skiis i did not notice any problems, but he was somewhat nervous to even mount the bindings and adjust to the boots, which he didnt end up doing...

 

Do anyone have any comments or suggestions...agree/disagree??? If so does anyone recommend a specific boot??? Any help would be greatly appreciated....

post #2 of 11

Just how soft and low-cut are your old boots?

 

Unsafe?  I doubt it.  Everythings unsafe, but it's all relative.  I could ski them carefully in old leather lace-ups and not be any more unsafe than I usually am skiing modern boots and skis.

 

Could you make better use of the skis with stiffer boots?  Probably.

post #3 of 11

I think he just wanted to sell you some boots...

post #4 of 11

If the boots are old and the heels and toes have been worn down, the boot will not fit well in the binding. The shops check for release points and don't want to be held liable for personal injury damages if the binding - boot interface does not work to their satisfaction. The problem is easily solved, by signing a waiver on the mounting and binding testing. Even then , if shop can't get the boot to not wobble in the binding after binding adjustment they won't motnt the binding with your boot. To get them to mount it, you can get the size of the your boot in mm or mondo size, and tell them to mount the binding using a boot they have in the shop with the same mm length as your current ski boot. . I beleive the heel and toe pieces height length, etc of ski boots from boot manufacturer to boot manufacturer is standardized.

 

One Caveat - I would check to see if the ski boot wobbles, or the binding setting is turned up way to high to surpress the wobble. The shop is concerned about your safety if this is the case. Easy to see if your boot is damaged,  - set the boot on a flat surface and see if it stands solidly upright with no wobble. Give it a slight sideways push, not enough to knock it over, but with just a slight touch to see if rocks from side to side. If that is the case, a new pair of boots is in order.  They are probably causing alignment issues if they wobble. You will enjoy the sport more, if you don't have these alignment problems caused by your boot.

 

Another issue, is that shops are reluctant to mount older bindings that more 7-10 yrs old for the same liability reasons, and mounting skis is not a big money -maker for them unless they sold you skis. So the money made in mounting is not worth the liability risk involved.

post #5 of 11

  

What he may have been thinking is that it is a fairly bad ass ski that needs to be driven hard and if you have a very soft boot you may not get everything out of the ski you otherwise might. If you have the skills to keep the pressure on it with that boot you may experience excessive dorsiflexion of the ankle trying to apply the appropriate pressure. 

The other thing you need to know is that the toe piece on that ski is 1mm higher than the heel, very different from nearly all other skis on the market. A racy boot with some forward lean to it feels quite natural on this ski.

 

 


Edited by pdxammo - 12/14/10 at 7:33am
post #6 of 11

Remember, your boots are your most important piece of equipment. So unless your over your head with the ski you likely would want to upgrade your boot.

   BTW Is anyone else have problems typing in the reply box? I have no cursor when I do, and can't move anything on the page so I can't fix mistakes without retyping the whole darn thing.

post #7 of 11

This is dangerous advice, there is no mention of the forward pressure indicator on the binding which needs to be properly adjusted for the binding to function properly. This is one of those cases of "if you have to ask". If you feel that the shop is making decisions by anything other than what is best for you, keep looking, there are good shops out there that care about your skiing, don't get frustrated and do it yourself unless you really know what your doing.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WildBillD View Post

If the boots are old and the heels and toes have been worn down, the boot will not fit well in the binding. The shops check for release points and don't want to be held liable for personal injury damages if the binding - boot interface does not work to their satisfaction. The problem is easily solved, by signing a waiver on the mounting and binding testing. Even then , if shop can't get the boot to not wobble in the binding after binding adjustment they won't motnt the binding with your boot. To get them to mount it, you can get the size of the your boot in mm or mondo size, and tell them to mount the binding using a boot they have in the shop with the same mm length as your current ski boot. . I beleive the heel and toe pieces height length, etc of ski boots from boot manufacturer to boot manufacturer is standardized.

 

One Caveat - I would check to see if the ski boot wobbles, or the binding setting is turned up way to high to surpress the wobble. The shop is concerned about your safety if this is the case. Easy to see if your boot is damaged,  - set the boot on a flat surface and see if it stands solidly upright with no wobble. Give it a slight sideways push, not enough to knock it over, but with just a slight touch to see if rocks from side to side. If that is the case, a new pair of boots is in order.  They are probably causing alignment issues if they wobble. You will enjoy the sport more, if you don't have these alignment problems caused by your boot.

 

Another issue, is that shops are reluctant to mount older bindings that more 7-10 yrs old for the same liability reasons, and mounting skis is not a big money -maker for them unless they sold you skis. So the money made in mounting is not worth the liability risk involved.

post #8 of 11

Will your old boot work with the new ski- yes it will, unless the sole is worn down or damaged.  Will a taller stiffer boot work better with this ski- most likely, but that will be an upgrade, not a necessary replacement.  

post #9 of 11

AC50s are great skies. They can be carved or muscled into very quick turns. However to use them to their potential you will need a strong forward stance. Without a good stiff boot to "bend" them they will not be as much fun as a more forgiving ski. I recommed a high performance ski boot to go along this ski. I agree with pdxammo,  boots are your most important equipment.

post #10 of 11

I have extensively skied the AC50 in Nordica TR12's (a very soft AT boot) and the experience wasn't terrible. Would stiffer boots have been a better fit, probably but I still had fun. Moral of the story? It's the Indian, not the arrow! or in this case the bow!

post #11 of 11

Seems to me like you might have got the wrong skis...  Yes I could ski any ski in leather boots, not bragging just a fact, BUT most accomplished skiers realize early on that boots are your most important peice of gear and have boots fitted for them that match thier ability level.  The fact that you are in older entry level boots makes me think that you might get tossed around by a ski like that and not enjoy it as much as something like the Apex or Enduro even with new "advanced boots".   Just my $.02

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