EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion ›  Looking for a Great source for Weather reports
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Looking for a Great source for Weather reports

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

How come Whenever I see a weather report it never tells me the one thing I really want to know which is "How much is it going to snow!!!!!!!!!!" Does anyone know a source that provides this information?

post #2 of 8

http://weather.gov/

 

Our local forecast office regularly produces these graphics:

make_img.php.png

post #3 of 8

I've been a weather fanatic for many years.  Here's your ticket:

 

 http://www.nws.noaa.gov/

 

That's right the Natl Weather Service.  They are every one else's source ultimately.  They are the only ones who tell you how many inches it will snow based on your exact location.  The others  (Intellicast, Weather.com, Snocast, Accuweather...) don't come even close, though Intellicast has great radar info. 

 

Local TV broadcast, ie evening news, often good too because those guys are locals.

 

Josh Fox's Single Chair Weather Blog is great but it's specific to MRG Vermont and he only posts once or twice a week.

 

NWS's web site is awesome. It could take years to discover its offerings:  long term predictions, current snowpack. forecast discussions...

post #4 of 8

The short and flip answer is that no-one can accurately predict snowfall at a specific location. There are a huge number of variables that can affect whether precipitation will be snowfall, and how much snow there will be. All of us have seen storms that are overhyped and produce little or nothing, or on the other hand, that produce the classic "6 inches of partly cloudy".

Nevertheless, there are a large number of weather sites that provide forecasts. Your first visit ought to be to the US Weather Bureau, which gives site-specific forecasts. If you know the town and zip code, you can get a 10 day forecast for that location. Also, many ski area web sites have links to local weather forecasts. Some are more customized than others. For instance, Alta has a page of weather links which include a special 24 hour weather forecast for the Big and Little Cottonwood canyons, where Alta, Snowbird, Solitude and Brighton are located.

There are also weather geek sites, including university meteorology departments, that provide access to the computer weather models on which forecasts are based. If you have time, you can compare different models and see how they can produce different forecasts. have fun!

post #5 of 8

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan from Pa View Post

The short and flip answer is that no-one can accurately predict snowfall at a specific location. There are a huge number of variables that can affect whether precipitation will be snowfall, and how much snow there will be. All of us have seen storms that are overhyped and produce little or nothing, or on the other hand, that produce the classic "6 inches of partly cloudy".

 

True, no-one can. Multi-million dollar mainframe computer.. better odds.


Go visit your local NWS office on an open house day or something. You'd be surprised how much computing power goes into their forecasts.

post #6 of 8
Http://www.snowforecast.com is a staple of mine. Pretty good if they have "enhanced" coverage for your mountain.
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys, I like snowforecast.com, gets right to the point

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by TFull View Post

Thanks guys, I like snowforecast.com, gets right to the point


They're pretty good. They did have a tendency to be a bit too optimistic for my mountain last year. However, the year of the Big One I would just take their forecast and multiply by 3.  Heh. Another good resource is the avalanche information center for your area. Dunno where you are but those are usually staffed by some decent forecasters. See: www.cbavalanchecenter.org for an example. One of the nice things around avalanche information centers is they have a tendency to deconstruct the storm a bit more in terms of snowfall for the various micro climates, aspects and elevations. Here in Colorado where orographic lifting plays a big role, the snowfall amounts can vary greatly over short distances. Here in CB 4 inches at mid mountain might mean 6-8 in Spellbound bowl, 10 in Teocalli bowl and 20 out at Irwin if the storm plays out right. I would imagine the same goes for back east where lake effect and what ever other crazy weather patterns in play out there can cause snowfall to vary substantially.

 

Best of luck!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion ›  Looking for a Great source for Weather reports