New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

glue for binding screws?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I have just mounted bindings for the first time and am very happy with the outcome. I mounted some railflex 2 plates on my Mantras and some Salomon Z12ti's on my daughters Salomon Maitai's. i have yet to glue the screws and am wondering what type of glue would be best.

 

I have marine epoxy as I sometimes build wooden kayaks but this seems way over the top. I'm thinking that this might be too much should i wish to remove the bindings at a later date.

 

What type of glue do the shops use? chemical name rather than trade name would be useful.

cheers 

 

post #2 of 18

The folks at Tognar recommend RooClear, which appears to be a proprietary acrylic-styrene polymer (according to the MSDS).  I think the shop guys get proprietary glues from the binding manufacturers.  I'm not sure how much it matters, as the strength comes from the screw threads gripping the ski, not from the glue.

 

Binding installation is supposed to be reversible.  I'd avoid epoxy for this reason, and also because of the heat during curing.

post #3 of 18

Roo Glue and SVST Binding sealant/glue are primarily to seal the drill hole and as Xela stated the screw secures the binding. Many highly recommend using the glue/sealant while others, like Lou Dawson of Wildsnow advocate a "Regular hardware store epoxy softens quickly (which is why I use it for ski mounts instead of more radical stuff)." By softens quickly he means when adding heat with a soldering iron tip on the screw head, making it easier to remove if needed.


Edited by Alpinord - 12/3/10 at 8:29am
post #4 of 18

Back in the day, when I worked in a ski shop we used this highly specialized glue.

 

http://www.elmers.com/about/wood-glue

 

post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by brownie_bear View Post

Back in the day, when I worked in a ski shop we used this highly specialized glue.

 

http://www.elmers.com/about/wood-glue

 



I've used this for many mounts over the years without issue.  As others have said the holding power comes from the screw threads.

post #6 of 18

I've also used household caulk.  It was handy and seemed to meet the purpose of sealing the holes.  I just removed a pair of toepieces that were caulked a couple years ago,  and everything worked fine.  Wood glue and other glues that harden would seem to have very little flexibility.  However,  I'm not sure it needs much, if any, flexibility.  I've also used wood glue with no issues.  I WOULD be leary of using any of those glues that expand as they harden.  Most likely it wouldn't cause any issues,  but it just doesn't seem to be the right application.

 

AM.

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attacking Mid View Post

I've also used household caulk.  It was handy and seemed to meet the purpose of sealing the holes.  I just removed a pair of toepieces that were caulked a couple years ago,  and everything worked fine. 


Careful with the caulk. You don't want to run into one of those that emit acetic acid as they cure. You will know they do because a bead will smell of vinegar.
Ammonia-smell caulk OK. Vinegar smell caulk BAD.
Quote:
Wood glue and other glues that harden would seem to have very little flexibility.  However,  I'm not sure it needs much, if any, flexibility.&

It doesn't. It only needs to be flexible enough to withstand thermal cycling and TCOE mismatch between the screw and the core material.
Quote:
nbsp; I've also used wood glue with no issues.  I WOULD be leary of using any of those glues that expand as they harden. 

Melamine ok. Moisture cured polyurethane (Gorilla, Titebond Purple) bad. Fortunately, the MCPU adhesives usually have a temperature label saying not for use at low temps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

The folks at Tognar recommend RooClear, which appears to be a proprietary acrylic-styrene polymer (according to the MSDS).


A lot of the Loctite products are like ^this.
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks All for info. I'll head down to bunnings (our home depot) and see what they have on offer. I have Araldite which is a soft epoxy, i have Aquadhere which is an exterior grade PVA wood glue, and I'm sure that Bunnings will have a glue for melamine which apears to be what Roo Glue is.

 

If anybody can reccommend a suitable Loctite product, i can get that easy enough.

 

alpinlord/Terry - I recieved my 12AB tap and it worked a treat along with the stepped drill. Japan, here I come.

post #9 of 18

I'd just use the PVA you already have unless it's been on the shelf long enough to clump up.  All the glue does is seal the wood in the core against moisture.

 

In the days of Hexcel skis, the screws would tear out if you didn't use some epoxy and let 'em hang upside down overnight to cure.  But those cores were expanded aluminum impregnated with epoxy.

post #10 of 18

Why use stuff that is not designed for the job.

Blue Loctite.

Designed to hold and release at a reasonable torque.

It is cyanoacrylate.

post #11 of 18

I have used several glues over the years (including waterproof wood glue) with good results.  But I recently switched to Roo Glue Clear, and like it the best.  It remains slightly flexible and is pliable in cold temperatures, and many shops swear by it.

 

BTW, make sure you spaced the front/rear RailFlex plates about 3mm -- that is somewhat important for ski flex, but often overlooked when mounting without a proper jig.

post #12 of 18

I use west system(a marine epoxy) for my mounts. I'm sure its overkill, but it works and its something I have on hand. Backing the threads out cold is pretty near impossible, but a soldering iron on the head for a few seconds and they come out without a fight. I make one pumps worth and mix in a pinch of the 406 adhesive filler to make it a little flexy. This is enough secure the new screws, fill the old holes if its a remount, and fix/attach a few things around the house that will never come apart again.

 

-Joe-

post #13 of 18

I looked at every glue at Home Depot and ended up using liquid nails perfect glue which is a nice acid free polymer that remains flexible and resists temps down to -60.

 

http://www.liquidnails.com/products/product.jsp?productId=85#details

 

post #14 of 18

Titebond II

post #15 of 18

I've done dozens of skis in the 40 years I've been mounting bindings with no glue.....just some parafin on the threads for seal/smooth turning.  I've only used glue for funky foam core and honeycomb skis.  I have never pulled one out.  I've seen a few XC bindings need a half turn to retighten, but never in an alpine ski.


Edited by newfydog - 12/12/10 at 9:02am
post #16 of 18

No glue is perfectly fine ;) You just check from time to time (once a winter normally does it's job), but in reality there's no need for glue. With xc skis it's a bit different, since core is basically just paper. But even there, no glue is needed (nowadays with Rotafella "rail" system, things are even easier since no screws are needed at all :)).

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

> BTW, make sure you spaced the front/rear RailFlex plates about 3mm -- that is somewhat important for ski flex, but often overlooked when mounting without a proper jig.


Has anyone amended that recommendation for reverse camber skis yet?
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Has anyone amended that recommendation for reverse camber skis yet?


I think the real answer lies in the jig -- as in, what do you get for plate spacing when you strap a drill jig onto those skis and establish the holes the proper way.  The shop manual is helpfully ignorant about any other considerations.  You'll always get a ~3mm plate spacing on whatever nominal ski camber exists on the work bench.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs