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Avalung Price

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Why are avalungs so expensive? Am I missing something  or is it pretty much just some tubing with two one way valves?

 

Edit: I miss spoke it uses a flap valve but two one way valves would achieve the same affect


Edited by lonewolf210 - 11/30/10 at 5:52pm
post #2 of 23

Black Diamond has a exclusive rights to the Patent on Avalung.

 

No competition = They dictate the prices.

post #3 of 23

What are they worth now.  I have a nice Avalung pack, but frankly have not used it. 

post #4 of 23

Other than the pack, you would not want to use it.

post #5 of 23

I bet the product liability insurance premium on those is nuts....

post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman View Post

Other than the pack, you would not want to use it.


So you wouldn't even bother getting one? I have been debating whether or not to get one or possibly simply build my own...

post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxman View Post

Other than the pack, you would not want to use it.


 


So you wouldn't even bother getting one? I have been debating whether or not to get one or possibly simply build my own...

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

I bet the product liability insurance premium on those is nuts....


I don't see why it would. It would be almost impossible to prove that any injury/death was a result of product failure and not user/natural events caused

post #8 of 23

I've got an avalung and I carry it in certain circumsatnces; but I would not ever want to use it for its intended purpose.  i.e. I would prefer to avoid being caught in an avalanche.

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 

would you consider it a vitally necessary piece of equipment to start venturing into the back country? I have the standard kit of beacon, probe shovel and am looking to get a pack. I can get a good deal from a friend who has an extra bca stash pack but if the avalung is vital I would like to get a pack with an integrated one

post #10 of 23

It's not vital, but it just might keep you that way.  I think the NARSID protection is just as important.  I wear my AvalungII on big days inbounds.  I ski trees a lot, often alone. 

post #11 of 23

You can watch this video on Youtube and see what you think about the cost of an avalung. It makes the price seem trivial. I couldn't find the original unedited video before Blackdiamond got a hold of it and made it into an ad. It was really chilling to watch. And this was best case in terms of rescue...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6C2eWRvZgKU

post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnz View Post

You can watch this video on Youtube and see what you think about the cost of an avalung. It makes the price seem trivial. I couldn't find the original unedited video before Blackdiamond got a hold of it and made it into an ad. It was really chilling to watch. And this was best case in terms of rescue...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6C2eWRvZgKU



the people commenting said that the guy didn't actually get the avalung all the way in his mouth and the rescuers had to still clear his airway ....

It also said its really only reliable for 58 mins

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post


It's not vital, but it just might keep you that way.  I think the NARSID protection is just as important.  I wear my AvalungII on big days inbounds.  I ski trees a lot, often alone. 






This. NARSID's scare the living **** out of me. More so than Avy danger to be honest. Atleast you can mitigate Avy danger by wise decision making and terrain selection. NARSID? Yikes...
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

It's not vital, but it just might keep you that way.  I think the NARSID protection is just as important.  I wear my AvalungII on big days inbounds.  I ski trees a lot, often alone. 

 

How would an avalung work in that situation?  With an avalanche you'd generally have a chance to get the mouthpiece into your mouth before you got stuck under the snow, right?  I'd think that would be a lot harder if you crashed into a tree well.
 

post #15 of 23
Acually it is probably the opposite. Easier to get the avalung into your mouth in a tree well than when you are burried by a slide. As for getting the lung into your mouth during a slide - I have spoken to two slide survivors that said getting it into your mouth while sliding was very hard. They both recommended skiing with it in your mouth after their slides. I think BD recommends the same. Both also wear ABS packs now. Heh.
post #16 of 23

I'd say WAY more likely that you could get it into your mouth in a treewell. IMO it's a much more viable safety feature for treewells than for avalanches. Being head-down in a treewell, assuming you haven't kept your poles strapped to your wrists, you could well have freedom to move your hands.

post #17 of 23

OK that makes sense I guess.  I thankfully have never experienced either a slide or being stuck in a tree well.

post #18 of 23

I have three different versions of the Avalung, for different situations (pack version, vest version, sling version).  I would not consider skiing the backcountry without one.  I often have 'had to' ski terrain so scary that I ski with the Avalung tube in my mouth, though so far I've not been avalanched in such a situation (yes, I have been in an avalanche, but that is another story).  Avalungs don't make you invulnerable (25-35% of skiers in a significant avalanche are killed by trauma), but they have saved many lives.  Oh, and it my understanding that BD sets the prices of Avalungs at their cost and sells them as a no-profit item.

post #19 of 23

I purchased my Avalung after getting trapped in a treewell.  I ended up inverted in very soft crystaline snow.  The first breath filled my mouth and nose.  By not panicking and carefully clearing an airway "cone" to the surface I was able to breath, but needed to wait for assistance from my partners, since struggling simply dumped snow into my air space.  An avalung would have been very easy to deploy.  Never again had occasion to use it, but that was my thinking.  These are MORE useful in NARSID incidents because the suffocation hazard can be virtually eliminated (assuming you are conscious), giving you time to release bindings and escape.

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post


I purchased my Avalung after getting trapped in a treewell.  I ended up inverted in very soft crystaline snow.  The first breath filled my mouth and nose.  By not panicking and carefully clearing an airway "cone" to the surface I was able to breath, but needed to wait for assistance from my partners, since struggling simply dumped snow into my air space.  An avalung would have been very easy to deploy.  Never again had occasion to use it, but that was my thinking.  These are MORE useful in NARSID incidents because the suffocation hazard can be virtually eliminated (assuming you are conscious), giving you time to release bindings and escape.






Dude. I already have this unnatural fear of tree wells. Just reading that gave me "on the third pass I could feel the sharks teeth as they sank into my femur" type willies. I am so going to start carrying mine again in the trees.
post #21 of 23

Treewells are the original cone of silence.  Yell, and no sound escapes.  I share your "willies".  I never expected it.  We were at the end of a very deep powder run after sking waist deep in a couloir and were taking a shallow traverse as fast as possible so as not to bog down in the deep sub-zero snow   The traverse collapsed under my lower ski and I figured to fall on my shoulder.  Instead I went headfirst into the fine branches of a fir tree in a 20 foot snow pack.  No branch was big enough to support me and the snow was so light and airy it just filled right back in, including my air space.  Its as effective a sealant as putting a plastic bag over your head and removing all the air.  That was the most memorable ski run of my life for the great conditions, terrain fast slough, and it really sucked at the end.  I was carrying a beacon, shovel, probe and had partners, (who came back uphill after I didn't join)  but the Avalung would have really been nice.

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by raspritz View Post

Oh, and it my understanding that BD sets the prices of Avalungs at their cost and sells them as a no-profit item.



What makes you think that?

In April, at the end of season, the price of Avalung II was about 100 euros and today the price is 139 euros.

This difference doesn't sound like a no-profit item to me...

post #23 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Que View Post

Acually it is probably the opposite. Easier to get the avalung into your mouth in a tree well than when you are burried by a slide. As for getting the lung into your mouth during a slide - I have spoken to two slide survivors that said getting it into your mouth while sliding was very hard. They both recommended skiing with it in your mouth after their slides. I think BD recommends the same. Both also wear ABS packs now. Heh.


http://summitcountyvoice.com/2010/12/03/ski-patroller-was-wearing-avalung-when-killed-by-slide/

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