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Cost of PSIA Demo Teams

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

The cost of PSIA membership is high with respect to what I get back as a part time instructor.  Several of my fellow part timers have dropped their memberships due to the high cost to value ratio.  Where does all our dues money go?  Can anyone point me to an annual budget?  In particular, I would like to know what the cost of the demo teams are to me.  What value to the demo teams give to me?  It seems to me that their biggest value it to local ski schools by sharing the latest thinking in skiing techniques.  Why should the employees be paying for something that is of greatest value to management?

post #2 of 13

I too will soon be a part time instructor and I don't know about your resort, but mine offers a 2 dollar raise per hour for every level of certification you receive.  Also, as a member of PSIA I'm pretty sure you will receive discounted tickets at the vast majority of resorts across North America.  There are many other small perks, but ultimately you are correct, PSIA is a big money grab, but necessary for any serious ski instructor who is devoted to his job.  And I'm not saying that it's right or wrong to getone, as some just simply can't justify the expensive rates for the amount of teaching/ skiing they do.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

My intent was not to question the need for PSIA.  It is, how can the cost of membership be reduced to reflect the value to the individual member.  Wondering where my dues are going.  How much does the demo team cost me?

post #4 of 13

Why don't you call them and ask? I'd think it's publicly available information. Personally, that's one thing I wouldn't mind paying for.

post #5 of 13

My ski area pays more for certification and pays more to a Level 2 than to a Level 1.

post #6 of 13

Your dues go to both your division and the national organization.  Each has a budget.  As a member, you can address your question to both.

 

I'm certain the demo team represents a very small portion of the total national organization's budget, yet it plays a significant role in developing ways for you to do a better job helping clients learn about skiing.  The demo team helps improve the training for the division examiners who provide the training for your experience.  If you are not taking advantage of your division's educational programs to help you do a better job, that's your failure, not the organization's.

 

I've been paying dues since 1969 and spending plenty almost every season to both improve my skiing and imporve my teaching.  I learn more every time I participate.

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonny View Post

The cost of PSIA membership is high with respect to what I get back as a part time instructor.  Several of my fellow part timers have dropped their memberships due to the high cost to value ratio. 



Nothing to with the Demo Team, but at my shop, the higher your cert level the more discount you get on gear. No cert=no discount/ pro form.

post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Your dues go to both your division and the national organization.  Each has a budget.  As a member, you can address your question to both.

 

I'm certain the demo team represents a very small portion of the total national organization's budget, yet it plays a significant role in developing ways for you to do a better job helping clients learn about skiing.  The demo team helps improve the training for the division examiners who provide the training for your experience.  If you are not taking advantage of your division's educational programs to help you do a better job, that's your failure, not the organization's.

 

I've been paying dues since 1969 and spending plenty almost every season to both improve my skiing and imporve my teaching.  I learn more every time I participate.


You're making a big assumption when you assume that this trickle down is universal. For many instructors, access to "divisional events" is another huge expense. For me, it's a minimum of $250 to travel, stay at a hotel, pay clinic fees and buy lift tickets. After paying their PSIA dues.

 

Pretty damn hard to justify to the younger instructors. Nor is pro-form, when it's usually possible to get deals just as good or better without it.

 

So, less than 50% of our instructors have PSIA membership. They don't see an advantage.I can't blame them.

post #9 of 13

For those of us not in the know, how much are the dues? 

post #10 of 13

Perhaps one of the national demo team members will chime in, but I understand that a big issue with the demo team is liability and workmen's comp insurance.  Evidently, the home mountains for the demo team members are not picking up insurance costs when they are doing clinics, nor are the mountains where the events are held.  And it's evidently pretty expensive to get that insurance.

 

Mike

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by COSkiGirl View Post

For those of us not in the know, how much are the dues? 



$50 for National, plus Divisional, which are $45 for those of us in the NW. Plus a fee for your annual educational credit. PSIA claims to be one of the lower rates for similar type of organizations, but it's fairly high as a percentage of income. a typical part time beginning instructor here will make less than $600 for the entire season.

 

Getting a level 1 is usually fairly inexpensive beyond the cost of joining PSIA, but it costs ~$250 plus expenses to test for each of the other levels. Many, if not most instructors have to take the exams  (especially level 3) more than one time.

 

I made around $900 last year; over a third of that went straight to PSIA, and another third paid my travel expenses for testing. The other $200 was more than eaten up by other expenses.

post #12 of 13

There are other monetary benefits.  Pro-deals through the national website have saved me hundreds of dollars this year alone, poles, helmet and skis at 1/2 price  (all 2011 models.)

 

Training clinics are a bargain.  $149 for a 2 day clinic including lift tickets led by extremely high level clinicians is a great deal.

 

Discounts at other areas hasn't saved me much, but a little.  Vail for $65 for example saves a lot.
 
The few hundred dollars that a Level II costs should be amortized over more then 1 year.

 

I agree that they don't "do" much "for" us (besides provide educational opportunities) - but all in all I think it is worth it.  As a part time instructor (which I am as well) there's little to be made after dues, but should one choose to teach full time, having a Level II Certification has good value and seems would assure one of better lessons.  That's my goal, to get that Silver Pin so someday I can retire to the mountains, teach and make enough to supplement the piss poor retirement account I'll have by then.

post #13 of 13

It's a decision each instructor makes. For you, worth it. Worth it for me as well...if I grit my teeth writing the check each year. For half the instructors, not worth it.

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