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How often do you TUNE your skis? (Ski Care)

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

How often do you tune your skis?

Do you tune them your self or at the Shop (what are some of the prices)?

What do you get done? Waxing, sharpening, bindings check, etc.?

Do i need to get my brand new skis tuned?

 

Any other ski care advice or tips would be GREATLY appreciated.

 

Thank you so much...

I own a snowboard but have never owned a pair of skis so i'm trying to gain some info on ski care


Edited by aikeybikeycikey - 11/21/10 at 12:02am
post #2 of 21

Short answer: It all depends.

 

Normally I get a major tune once or twice a season (depending on how often I ski or if I've encountered east coast rocks or ice). If I've been skiing on hardpack or ice, I use my Swix edge sharpener to touch up my edges. Every morning I apply a liquid wax such as Swix F4 or Toko liquid floro wax. Buff the bases and you're good to go. So far as cost for tuning, look up a few local ski shops on the interwebs.

 

Maintenance for skis are about the same as snowboards.

post #3 of 21

Short answer; When they need it.

 

Same as a board.

 

post #4 of 21

It's simple...

 

Major tune-up /like sending the skis to SKI MD, or doing it at your local shop/ 1-2 times a year.. I would say if you ski  around 60 days a year, do it twice.. That includes checking the bases for flatness, base grind if needed, setting the correct/ for your abilities and type of skiing base and side bevel/

 

Waxing you can do it every day if you got time.. There isn't such a thing as too much wax  . The more the better.

 

Sharpening  assuming you got your bases perfectly flat the very first time and your base and side bevels are set to be perfect, you have to sharpen the skis after every 3-4 times on the snow. I am talking just maintaining the side bevel with medium/ like 300-400 coarse diamond stone/...

 Once  do the side bevel;go to base clean the burrs and back to side cleaning the burrs once over..

That is it.

post #5 of 21

Best short answer was; "when needed" !

 

What is needed?

 

If you accept that you tune skis so that you will ski better, easier with less effort then it must be "every time you ski!"

 

Sorry,,but tuning skis and boards IS NOT same procedure!

 

Back to every time issue!

 

There are levels of tuning! Every time means checking edges for dings and ,,,,

 

Checking for base scratches,,,,

 

In my case I wax every time I ski! 

 

In Europe we have varied terrain so we must wax!

post #6 of 21

Dollars and cents aside, there are only a handful of places I trust to tune my skis (I've had some bad experiences), none of which are in my backyard, so I've become quite adept at milking a tune. With some routine maintenance, and provided you don't do any serious damage (core shot, etc.), you can go an awfully long time before you need a shop tune.

 

Using a guide, I touch up my edges with a diamond stone at the end of the day, and wax at least every other day. The file comes out only when there's a really bad ding, and I take care of minor base repairs myself.

 

I once went 50+ days before having to bring my skis in, but the norm is around 30 days when I've accumulated enough unrepairable edge dings. 

post #7 of 21

If they came used they get a major tune.  If they came new they get a light tune.  After that, they get a light tune after every 12-24 hours of skiing and stored with unscraped all purpose wax when not in use.

post #8 of 21

I usually ski 3-4 days a week in the east from Dec. through April. To me it's worth it to buy a season tune at a local shop close to where I ski most often. I pick up my skis when heading to the mountain in the morning, use them a few days , then drop them off when I go back home. I've been using the same shop for several years & feel they do a good job on my skis only doing what is necessary to keep them like new. If that means filling in scratces or dings that's what they do/ The cost is $150 for the seaon & I figure they get tuned roughly 15 times.

post #9 of 21

I ski in the East 4 or more times a week.  The most I'd go without at least checking the skis out is 2 days, if it's icy I will do a minor tune every day as the edges get dinged up.  I'll usually wax every 2 days, sometimes 3.  Details follow:

 

My routine is to lightly debur the side edges with diamond stones every day or two of skiing, if there is a real ding on an edge I'll use a coarse stone first, otherwise just medium and fine.  

 

Every couple of weeks if needed I will file the side edges followed by successively finer stones.

 

When I ski in Colorado for two weeks, most of this is unnecessary, just a light stoning once in a while, but the soft snow does not rough up the edges like Eastern hardpack does.

 

As to wax I like to keep the bases from drying out so at lot of it is visual, I can see when they need wax (as far as protecting the bases is concerned.)  If I want to be fast that day, or have a lot of cat tracks to ski on I'll wax for speed.  I've used many different methods over the years (drip on and iron hot wax, paste wax, rub on and iron hot wax, liquid.  Rays Wax Wizard is a tool I use often.)   

 

Ptex filling for dings, light SkiVisions base stoning and other things happen when needed.

post #10 of 21

I ski in the West, rarely have ice.  The edges get a major tune, base stone ground, etc. ONCE a season.  Why?  Because after the stone grind, it takes a while to get the base wax saturation back to where I'm happy.  And, inevitably, it interferes with skiing if done mid-season.  Wax, I do myself every 2-3 days, really every 60,000 feet, which sort of levels out the days for different amounts of skiing.  I also use a diamond stone when I was, usually not finding anything on the edges, there's minimal rock issue here. 

I'm going to try my own side bevel sharpening this year, as I think in the past there's been a slight difference between the degrees done by the shop, even when I specify, and the ACTUAL bevel on my edge guide, which leads to DULLING the new sharp edge off. I figure if I use the same guide for the file I am sharpening with, this problem will disappear. 

post #11 of 21

I do a light edge touch-up daily (and at lunch on the few hard, irregular surface days each season when the edges get beat up)

 

I wax daily for the East coast unless expecting dry powder.  Usually cheap hydrocarbon or F4 wax unless it will be below 5* (squeaky slow) or above 40* (water-laden).

 

I wax weekly for mid-season Rockies, every 2-3 days for October and May in Colorado.

post #12 of 21

I'll typically get mine tuned up at the start of the year, and maybe once more 1/2 way through if it's been a heavy season.  It also depends on where/what you ski.  I ski mostly in the northeast.

post #13 of 21

I know I'm weird, but I have excuse :) All together 20+ years of ski racing and being WC tech makes you think different way about skis. redface.gif So even if it doesn't matter anymore, my skis get "serviced" after every day. It doesn't take much, so I'm done in less then 10mins if it was normal day, and my edges didn't have meeting with stones on track. Layer of wax (Swix CH7 normally), which stays on if I'm not going skiing next day, and drag or two over edges with something we call "magic stone", and edges are as sharp as you would ever want... even for injected courses ;)

I know this is exaggerating for recreational use, but as I wrote... I have excuse for being anal about these things :)

post #14 of 21

+1… As an ex-racer I guess most people would consider me anal about my skis as well... I wax and touch up my edges daily  ....It is just something I have always done...

Also, since I don't trust 95% of the shops out there to touch my skis, I always travel with basically everything I would need to do anything from a minor touch up to a full tune up...much to the chagrin of numerous hotels (At least when I was younger).

Besides, I find working on my skis to be a sanctuary from the stress of everyday real life and find it to be almost a form of meditation for me. 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

I know I'm weird, but I have excuse :) All together 20+ years of ski racing and being WC tech makes you think different way about skis. redface.gif So even if it doesn't matter anymore, my skis get "serviced" after every day. It doesn't take much, so I'm done in less then 10mins if it was normal day, and my edges didn't have meeting with stones on track. Layer of wax (Swix CH7 normally), which stays on if I'm not going skiing next day, and drag or two over edges with something we call "magic stone", and edges are as sharp as you would ever want... even for injected courses ;)

I know this is exaggerating for recreational use, but as I wrote... I have excuse for being anal about these things :)

post #15 of 21

primoz - what is the Magic Stone?  please, please tell us!

post #16 of 21

Basically it's ceramic/porcelain "stone" which is a whole lot harder then edge material. With enough pressure, one drag on base and one on side makes extremely sharp edge. It just takes "a bit" of experience and a bit of thinking outside of box, and it works :) It lasts long enough to get you through day or even more on icy slope. Normally warmup/inspection skis on WC are done this way, which just tells you, you really shouldn't worry about not being sharp enough for normal courses :)

But of course this works only when your edges are in normal shape. If they are in bad shape (not flat, burs, etc.), you need to fix that first.

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

Basically it's ceramic/porcelain "stone" which is a whole lot harder then edge material.


SkimangoJazz  Swix makes a ceramic stone, the Swix product number is T0998 .(fine)...Ceramic stones are more for touching up an edge and basicly refines the exact edge geometry from previous tools.

 

You should be able to get one on line. I know Artech has the Swix ceramic stones in both fine and course grade..($16.00 ea)

I personally use a Spyderco ceramic stone, it costs more than the Swix, ($30.00) but it is a double stone with both fine and course sides on one stone.  (also at Artech)  makes one too       

  You should be able to get one one li
 

post #18 of 21

Well I have all kinds of stones, but not one of those.  Until now.  Just ordered the Spyderco from from Artech.

 

Do you use it with a guide or do you both free hand it?

post #19 of 21



Wow, lot of different answers none 100% right and none wrong either.  Answering your questiions lst:

Quote:
Originally Posted by aikeybikeycikey View Post

How often do you tune your skis?  Wax every 3 or 4 days, find that a good hot wax will last 2 days for sure and 3 almost the same. may go 4 on a really cold wax in powder. Tuning; check edges, structure, flatness, base and side debgree angles.  Run a finger down the edges and if sharp and no gouges or burrs I leave them be.

 

 

Do you tune them your self or at the Shop (what are some of the prices)?  In almost 40 yrs of skiing I took them to a shop once (Granite Chief at Squaw) they screwed them up and it took me about 3 days skiing and tuning to get them good again.  I never take my skis to a shop but do all my own work.

 

 

What do you get done? Waxing, sharpening, bindings check, etc.?  All myself.

 

Do i need to get my brand new skis tuned?  Usually not, most skis are pretty good, unless you have something special you need or want.  Find out what degree edge and base the skis are best at and/or already set at.   Most ski's are 1 degree bevel base and 2 degrees side bevel but some are 3 degree side so chec k and see. However your brand new skis will need wax and usually a good ski shop will include a good wax when you purchase.  Lots of opionion out there on wax but really think a good hot wax, ironed in by hand give you the best slide and longest lasting finish. There are a lot of intricacies to a good wax; base structure amound and type, type of wax, method of wax application, wax scraping and post scraping structuring all come into play.

 

Any other ski care advice or tips would be GREATLY appreciated.    My Opinion.  Ski tuning is not rocket science and shouldn't be un less you are an elite racer or think you are an elite racer.  There are a lot of good books out on tuning.  A free and very thorough treatsie on tuning is my Alpinord the owner of Slidewright an epic spon sor.  Clic up Slidewright and view some of the tuning tips, they are good.

 

 

 

Thank you so much...

I own a snowboard but have never owned a pair of skis so i'm trying to gain some info on ski c

 

Back when I raced ski tuning and waxing were very important to me.   When in Portillo the Canadian downhill team was training and one night I went down to their wax room in the basement of the Octogon, brought two six packs of Corona with me and spent about 1 and a half hours getting taught how to tune and wax a ski, really invaluable.  But to a skier, don't over do it, KISS works really well and if you have good edges, good wax, the right ski and some skill - it will be the motor that determines the sucess ratio not  a perfect edge or wax.
 

 AND, you don't have to learn everything at once.  Good luck, good skiing and welcome to the parallel stick guys and gals.

post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 

wow some great info guys

thanks you all :D

post #21 of 21

Quote:

Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
Do you use it with a guide or do you both free hand it?


Free hand. It's not meant to "polish" edge with current degree "settings". My English is obviously not good enough, so I have no idea how to really describe this procedure, but lets try anyway, and you will tell if it makes any sense.

Let's say you have 0 degree setting on base. So you don't hold stone with 0 degrees on base, but with let's say 10 or 20 degrees, so it's actually touching just real edge of ski edge. You drag once with lot of pressure and that's it. Beforehand (for GS, SG or DH skis, or after that for SL skis) you do same thing on side. So it actually creates sort of  burr??? straight on edge. Of course it doesn't last long, but it will easily get you through day on icy slope. And as long as your edges are intact, this is basically all you need, and nicest of all, it takes less then minute and you are done. And it can be done without having skis fixed somewhere, so with a bit of experience, you can do it even on slope.

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