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The NEW Salomon Enduro Skis - Page 2

post #31 of 54

But Enduro is mostly frontside skiing and Kendo 50-50, but guess it fits best backside?

post #32 of 54

I just don't buy any of the "this ski is only good on front side etc.."   I don't buy it because it doesn't seem to pertain to me.  just my opinion.. 

post #33 of 54

Quote:

Originally Posted by funch View Post

But Enduro is mostly frontside skiing and Kendo 50-50, but guess it fits best backside?


You know to be honest, I don't really give importance to all this stuff about frontside and backside percentages. I prefer trying out the ski and if I like it and feel comfortable I will buy it.

post #34 of 54

I understand both of u, but just asking. When you come from a location where you just cannot try the ski before buying, then you need to read alot and be informed by people who have used it.

post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by funch View Post

I understand both of u, but just asking. When you come from a location where you just cannot try the ski before buying, then you need to read alot and be informed by people who have used it.

Definately I know what you mean.  That's how I had decided to buy the Kendo, with recommendation from other people and based on what people have written. But then I actually tried the Enduro and really loved them, so that's why I'm having trouble deciding which to buy. I really hope I get to demo the Kendo soon or else like you said, you have to trust the reviews.
 

 

post #36 of 54

Having demo'd the Kendo, and skied full days on the Enduro (both 2011 and 2012 84mm wide version), I'd say they're both terrific, damp, powerful carving skis, with the Enduros being quicker turning.  And I consider them both "50-50 skis" or "all mountain skis".

 

Off piste I'd give the nod to Enduro's because of they're more easily steered in crud (it's probably the small amount of tip rocker).  The slight difference with width is insignificant.

 

Like pdiddy says, you'll love either of them.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

 

 

post #37 of 54

How they handle in crud is one of my favorite aspects of the Kendo... so probably can't go wrong either way.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crudmaster View Post

Having demo'd the Kendo, and skied full days on the Enduro (both 2011 and 2012 84mm wide version), I'd say they're both terrific, damp, powerful carving skis, with the Enduros being quicker turning.  And I consider them both "50-50 skis" or "all mountain skis".

 

Off piste I'd give the nod to Enduro's because of they're more easily steered in crud (it's probably the small amount of tip rocker).  The slight difference with width is insignificant.

 

Like pdiddy says, you'll love either of them.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

 

 



 

post #38 of 54

That's a relief. Thanks that was very helpful Crudmaster and Jaytierney..I guess it's good to know you can't go wrong. I guess it comes down to do I want a rocker tip or a more traditional camber ski, and of course the looks..lol!

post #39 of 54

I just bought the Salomon XW Enduro in 170cm at the Toronto ski show. I would call it an impulse buy, especially since I never demoed it and I knew it is rather stiff. The sales person told me they are the same as the 2012 XT 850, but now I realize that is not the case.

 

Last year I demoed the Nordica Hot Rod Pro Helldiver I-Core (170cm, 132-90-118) and I loved that ski. I particularly enjoyed them in the heavy, wet, slushy snow that I had to deal with that day. I wonder how the Salomon Enduro measures up to the Nordica Helldiver. If they are much stiffer, I may have made an $800 mistake. J

 

 

 

post #40 of 54

Unless you're older or lighter than me, (155 lbs, 56 yrs), you'll love 'em.  As I wrote about the 2011 Enduros earlier in this post:

 

"So why didn't I buy them and end my search for a new daily driver?  Because they're somewhat stiff.  At 155 pounds I have to be really on my game to bend them well in tough snow, and I'm getting too old to always ski at 110%.  I think they're as good as any ski today as a 50-50 ski for a 180 pounder, and I'll have to keep looking."

 

I was talking about the 177s.  I think you're gonna love the 170's because they're more nimble in the crud and quick-carving on the packed than anything you've skied before.  And as written earlier, they ski softer than AC-50s.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #41 of 54

Thanks crudmaster. I am almost 50, but I am in very good shape from all the mountain bike racing that I do (including 8 hour endurance solos). I am also a strong skier so I hope to have no problem with these skis. I have to add that I made the decision to buy them based on Ski Canada reviews (which were excellent) and your great review, all read quickly at the ski show prior to pulling the trigger. :D

post #42 of 54

I was thinking of grabbing the '10/11 Enduros but I am uncertain of what size to get. I demo'd them one day last year, and don’t remember the size, but its either 163 or 170.


I am 39yo, 5'9, 200lbs, stocky, fairly athletic despite the beer belly, with strong legs.

I am a (low?) intermediate skier who skies about 6 days a year over past 2 years (after 6 year absence from doing any skiing at all). I ski in New England.

I like to rip the groomers, not too elegant a turner, kind of power my way through stuff. Loved the 2-4" of powder I frequently found myself in and trying to do some tree skiing.

I loved how these skies felt, how they floated over crud, how good they felt at speed, though I did have a bit of trouble with smaller, quicker turns (compared to other skies I tried), but I am hoping to increase my skills and 'grow into them'

Can you recommend size based on what I told you (feel free to ask more questions)

post #43 of 54

I know we're talking about the earlier stiffer Enduros, but at 200 lbs, surely you ought'a get the 170, at least.

 

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

 

post #44 of 54

I think these skis are a bit too much for a lower intermediate. If you intend to continue to ski around 6 days/year, you may be better off with something more forgiving. However, if you are confident of your choice, I would guess that the 170 cm is more appropriate.

post #45 of 54

Hi Guys, I demo'd the earlier Enduro's on an artificial slope in the uk last year @ 173 and first impressions-loved them, but got put off as a lot of reviews said it was a stiff experts only ski etc.etc.

 

After last seasons lack of soft snow in Europe I'm really thinking about getting a pair but torn between the 850s vs 800s, anyone tried them both? how do they compare in terms of stiffness etc.

 

My current skis to give you an idea of what I'm used to are- Salomon Lords 177, and Salomon 3vs 155sl ( mainly artificial use) I guess I'm looking for a more agile ski than the Lords that will be good all round but won't be too stiff in softer conditions. I'm 5' 8" in thick socks and 160 lbs tops!

 

Thanks!   

post #46 of 54

I can understand that, was hoping to be able to take some lessons this year and improve.

 

What other skies like this would be considered more forgiving?

post #47 of 54

gulp looks fun,

 

The 850 and 800 are about the same from everything I heard (I did not ski either, so this is based on other people's opinion). the only difference is the the 800 is a bit narrower, which might be good for you if you alresdy have the Lord!

 

Sandman0000,

 

The 850 is more forgiving since they use bamboo for the wood core (the original XW Enduro had no bamboo). But the 850 is also a bit damp and not everyone loves that feeling. Another very good option seems to be the Rossignol Experience 88. I keep hearing lots of good things about this ski.

post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post

 

Sandman0000,

 

The 850 is more forgiving since they use bamboo for the wood core (the original XW Enduro had no bamboo). But the 850 is also a bit damp and not everyone loves that feeling. Another very good option seems to be the Rossignol Experience 88. I keep hearing lots of good things about this ski.



Thanks.

 

Was looking for something I could find used, and those are new skiis.

 

from poking around the site, are these some others I should consider? Dynastar Sultan Legend, Line p90, Volkl kendo, Head Monster

 

any others?

 

 


Edited by sandman00000 - 10/25/11 at 10:55am
post #49 of 54

I skied the Sultan and hated them. They felt lifeless and uninspiring to me. Compared to the Nordica Helldiver that I demoed the same day, they felt like 2x4s. The Kendo (I almost bought them at the ski show) seems to be a fantastic ski for advanced to expert skiers, but they are probably in the same class as the Enduro, in terms of forgiveness.

 

The Head Monster im 78 is a great all mountain ski. I also demoed that ski 2 years ago and I found them to be perfect in most conditions for a lighter skier (they were more forgiving that the Monster 82 big brother, although they softened the new Monster 82 a bit).

post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post

gulp looks fun,

 

The 850 and 800 are about the same from everything I heard (I did not ski either, so this is based on other people's opinion). the only difference is the the 800 is a bit narrower, which might be good for you if you alresdy have the Lord!

 

Sandman0000,

 

The 850 is more forgiving since they use bamboo for the wood core (the original XW Enduro had no bamboo). But the 850 is also a bit damp and not everyone loves that feeling. Another very good option seems to be the Rossignol Experience 88. I keep hearing lots of good things about this ski.


TomB

 

Thanks, I was really looking for a replacement for the lord as I'm not getting the ideal conditions to use them and thought the Enduro might be the best compromise, something with a bit of float if it does get soft but more fun on piste and bumps than the lords. 
 

 

post #51 of 54

I tried the XT 800 and found that it's one of those skis where you can actually consider going down a size. I weigh 192 lbs and was surprised to discover that the 175 had more edge hold than most of the other skis I demoed in 180 or above. If I hadn't tested the ski, I probably would have gone for the 182. However, after demoing, I think I like the 175 better than the 182. The only advantage I can see in the 182 is that it's better suited for powder days. Other than that, the 175 seems much more agile and fun to me. Of course, you can probably go faster on the 182, but my top speed rarely goes higher than 90 Km/h (if I'm to believe that trusty iPhone ski app).

 

As for the difference between the 800 and the 850, the 800 can handle a wide variety of turn radii whereas the 850 seems slightly more GS oriented. Both skis have a "race" feel to them (very quick edge to edge), but are surprisingly smooth and easy to handle considering their level of performance. From what I could see, the 850 requires a stronger skier though. 

post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by gulp looks fun View Post



TomB

Thanks, I was really looking for a replacement for the lord as I'm not getting the ideal conditions to use them and thought the Enduro might be the best compromise, something with a bit of float if it does get soft but more fun on piste and bumps than the lords. 

 

Ok, so after my last post I sold my lords and opted for the 850s @ 170, so the inevitable then happened in Europe last week while away "major dumps of snowfall!" Now thinking I'd made a mistake on the type of ski and length for the conditions I was kind of kicking myself on the journey out.

Well I needn't have worried, on piste these were fantastically smooth with rock solid edge grip in longer turns, great fun with a nice kick out of shorter turns, nearly as much fun as my slalom skis "almost!" We had a couple of feet of powder on the second day and this is where they surprised me the most, still enough float to have the most fun in a while and still great after a couple of days later in the chop.

Mine have the z speed plate and I played with the binding position a little, I found the original position of the bindings gave the ski an ever so slightly front heavy feel combined with a fwd/aft balance point favouring slightly aft (for me) especially in the powder, moving the bindings a couple of clicks fwd 1/4" or so resolved both minor issues a gave me a perfectly balanced feel!

I may just have found my perfect all round ski!
post #53 of 54

Gulp,

 

Sounds like you made the right decision. Thanks for the feedback, I am looking forward to get my Enduros on snow. 

post #54 of 54

Well I finally had a chance to ski the Salamon Enduro Xwing skis for a couple of days. Conditions varied from hard conditions yesterday to very soft, wet, heavy snow conditions today (today we also had some rain). 

 

I am 49 years old, 155 lbs, strong technical skier who relies on finess and loves a high energy ski. My Enduros are 170cm, btw.

 

The Enduro ski did not disappoint me, even though they are stiffer and more damp than I prefer. The skis are heavy and you can feel the swing weight as you go up the chair and swing them left and right. For those who ski with pivot entry or a lot of rotation, the Enduro will be a lot of work. But this characteristic is also what makes these skis great in crud and uneven conditions. They just bust through like little tanks and will keep their line. Stay centered, ride the edges and enjoy the smooth ride.

 

They carve quite well and are ideal for longer GS type of turns, but due to the 16m radius, they can pump out nice SL turn, but it takes some work. Even though they are rather stiff, they do not feel very harsh in rough conditions and they flex nicely with the terrain. I think they would be ok for big, nicely spaced out bumps, but in tight, uneven bumps they would be a lot of work, I imagine.

 

Overall I like the ski, but I have to admit that they are a bit "tank-like". They are best suited to a heavier advanced or expert skier, who uses modern technique (tipping to turn with minimum pivoting and rotation) and likes to cruise. In 170cm they are good in short turns (but far from agile) and excellent in long turns. In longer lengths they would probably be even more stable at high speeds, but they would absolutely suck in short SL turns. Note that I compare them with a SL ski when I say that. Frankly they are not the ideal all mountain ski for me. I would prefer something lighter and with a bit more energy. But I also like the idea of having little tanks attached to my feet to plough through stuff, while still maintaining a smooth, stable ride. And I like a challenge, so I am keeping the skis. :)

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