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Ski wax - Favorites?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

So after researching the forums and guides, I have a handle on what TYPES of wax I should use for what conditions, but then when looking at purchasing some, the selection was overwhelming. So that's where I'd like your advice. What is your favorite wax for your cold NW wet snow? Alternatively, what is your favorite wax for the drier Utah-type snow and warmer conditions? Is there a favorite you prefer for a pair of new skis first coat? I'm looking for your favorite brands and flavors, such as the Swix F4, for example.

 

I think I need to order a small variety of waxes, because I'll be skiing all different conditions and locations this season (hopefully!)

post #2 of 13

I use Racewax.com's green for cold and red for "regular".  The hydro stuff.  Works great and less expensive than most "famous" waxes.  Dr. D is also a site supporter and if you are a supporter, he gives nice discounts. 

post #3 of 13

I've got about 15 lbs of this orange stuff I've been using for about the past 6 years. Works pretty well.

post #4 of 13

hohlmenkohl rocks, though I need a more economical wax. racewax generic, huh? so I just go to bulkorangewax.com eh, Jer?

post #5 of 13

Racewax is at racewax.com

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I use Racewax.com's green for cold and red for "regular".  The hydro stuff.  Works great and less expensive than most "famous" waxes.  Dr. D is also a site supporter and if you are a supporter, he gives nice discounts. 



Nice! Is it really that simple? I saw the red and green set on there, and that sounds like quite a simple set up.

post #7 of 13

I can recommend the Briko-Maplus Race Base Medium Ski Wax (available from Slidewright) as a great choice for a wide temp range ( -5f to spring slush ) with superior durability and amazing glide for a reasonable priced hydro wax. I use it as my daily wax and training wax for Masters Racing in Summit County Colorado. I like the Briko-Maplus Race Base Soft or Race Service Special Base Conditioner (SBC-1) for new ski or base ground ski base conditioning.

post #8 of 13

Depending on where you ski, you might not even need the green.  I only use that when temperatures are really low and since I'm in Montana, we get COLD.  If you're normally skiing when it's in the 20's, red is all you'll need. 

 

By the way, at some point I bought a LOT of the Toko red, I think it was on sale or something at the end of the season.  I don't like it near as much as the Racewax.com stuff.  I only use the Toko for my summer wax. 

 

At the beginning of the season when I'm doing my first prep, I do use some blue Swix, but it's very tough to work with.  You have to iron it on, then rewarm it to do the scrape.  If you're just starting out, I'd stay away from the stuff.  The first time I used it, the wax was as hard as plastic and I thought I'd ruined my skis.  Over time, I've gotten used to working with it, but generally it's not crucial.  I just use it as a nice base protection for initial conditioning.  I don't touch the stuff again no matter how cold it is.  For one thing, once the season gets going, I don't have the TIME to fool with it.  And so far, the green stuff has been able to handle almost every single temperature of "frigid" that I've asked for.  (I do remember one day I was out and I had not only my ski clothes on, but also an Eddie Bauer arctic-level down jacket and an extra pair of outer pants because it was more than 10 degrees below zero and the wind was just howling...  I think it was sort of slow that day...  smile.gif )
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I use Racewax.com's green for cold and red for "regular".  The hydro stuff.  Works great and less expensive than most "famous" waxes.  Dr. D is also a site supporter and if you are a supporter, he gives nice discounts. 



Nice! Is it really that simple? I saw the red and green set on there, and that sounds like quite a simple set up.

post #9 of 13

There are a zillion opinions about this subject, and instead of pushing brands here is a basic idea that works great for me and is economical:

1) Use a "base" or another soft wax as base prep.   Iron/scrape several times.  The only exception is if you are using the Hertel Racing FC739 as a universal wax (use that as the base prep wax).

2) Use a quality universal wax of your choosing.  You can purchase 200g - 500g bars at great prices.  SWIX/TOKO, Holmenkol, Maplus, Hertel, Dominator, KUU, etc. all manufacture quality wax.  It likely will not matter which brand you buy.

3) Use a warm or cold graphite or graphite/molybdenum wax with the universal wax at the extreme temperatures.  Just rub it on the base (this way a bar lasts forever) and iron in the universal stuff over it.  The graphite stuff has great anti-electrostatic properties in the extreme cold temps and repels dirt, pollen, etc. in the warmer temps.

4) Don't worry about moisture specific (the flouro stuff) wax unless you are racing.

5) Buy all your wax and tuning supplies from sponsors of this site.  You can get honest information from them through phone calls or e-mails.

 

Granted, nothing beats having a full arsenal of specific temperature and moisture wax.  But it really doesn't matter any more if you aren't a WC racer since most all-temp universal waxes do a decent job, and they can be made to work well in the extended temperature ranges by adding a little temperature specific graphite or graphite/molydebum wax.

 

Note: Others posting on this web site have a similar strategy for waxing at the extreme temperature ranges, using colored temperature specific waxes instead or graphite or a graphite/molydebum blend.  I have no doubts that their combinations work for them.  I'm just letting you know what has been working great for me.

 

Note well: Graphite wax will discolor clear/white/red/blue bases.  Racers obviously don't care (many are on mostly black bases, anyway), but you might.


Edited by quant2325 - 11/18/10 at 12:11pm
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 

Great! Thanks for all of the great input. I'll be ordering some wax from a sponsor pretty soon, then.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

There are a zillion opinions about this subject, and instead of pushing brands here is a basic idea that works great for me and is economical:

1) Use a "base" or another soft wax as base prep.   Iron/scrape several times.  The only exception is if you are using the Hertel Racing FC739 as a universal wax (use that as the base prep wax).

2) Use a quality universal wax of your choosing.  You can purchase 200g - 500g bars at great prices.  SWIX/TOKO, Holmenkol, Maplus, Hertel, Dominator, KUU, etc. all manufacture quality wax.  It likely will not matter which brand you buy.

3) Use a warm or cold graphite or graphite/molybdenum wax with the universal wax at the extreme temperatures.  Just rub it on the base (this way a bar lasts forever) and iron in the universal stuff over it.  The graphite stuff has great anti-electrostatic properties in the extreme cold temps and repels dirt, pollen, etc. in the warmer temps.

4) Don't worry about moisture specific (the flouro stuff) wax unless you are racing.

5) Buy all your wax and tuning supplies from sponsors of this site.  You can get honest information from them through phone calls or e-mails.

 

Granted, nothing beats having a full arsenal of specific temperature and moisture wax.  But it really doesn't matter any more if you aren't a WC racer since most all-temp universal waxes do a decent job, and they can be made to work well in the extended temperature ranges by adding a little temperature specific graphite or graphite/molydebum wax.

 

Note: Others posting on this web site have a similar strategy for waxing at the extreme temperature ranges, using colored temperature specific waxes instead or graphite or a graphite/molydebum blend.  I have no doubts that their combinations work for them.  I'm just letting you know what has been working great for me.

 

Note well: Graphite wax will discolor clear/white/red/blue bases.  Racers obviously don't care (many are on mostly black bases, anyway), but you might.


icon14.gif

Agreed on all points with a minor twist on #4.  I really like Maplus Low-Fluoro Liquid (P2), not so much because of the fluoro component, but it's very easy to "freshen" your skis, after a day of skiing, instead of going through the full waxing cycle.  I usually apply the liquid, let it dry for a few minutes, and either iron in or cork (depending where I am) and brush a little bit (not a big deal if you don't brush because the layer is so thin).

I've found that this let's me stretch one good waxing to a week of skiing with less than 5 minutes per day.

That stuff is pretty economical, too, because so little gets used.  

post #12 of 13

Been using Hertel wax since 1980.

post #13 of 13

I switch between Swix and Holmenkohl. I buy Swix Low Flouro Universal in bulk which I use as an everyday or prep wax. Depending on special requirements, I will make use of a vast selection of Hydrocarbon and Low and High Flouros. Powder and spray top coats have their place in my tool kit.

 

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