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Wearing out a tune

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

...and I'm not talking about the jackass standing next to you in the elevator whistling Don't Worry Be Happy badly for 100 floors.

 

What is it -- besides the obvious like rocks and trees -- that causes skis to lose their tune. Is it just friction?

post #2 of 6

You have to routinely sharpen axes, kitchen knives, ice skates and everything else that "cuts" because the edges dull from use and being exposed to the elements (friction, oxidation, damage are other wear).  Ski edges are no different if you want them to perform optimally.

post #3 of 6

Wear from friction.

post #4 of 6

And for the first coupl'a years the epoxy in the ski can continue to cure causing the ski to cup.

post #5 of 6


That may explain why my formerly flat Kastles looked like this before I flattened them with a plane. I've been wondering if hot waxing accentuated the cupping.

 

kastle-cup.jpg

 

kastle-flatter.jpg

 

(Note light intensity is highest at the center and the camera makes this image look less flat than it truly is...)

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post

And for the first coupl'a years the epoxy in the ski can continue to cure causing the ski to cup.


Edited by Alpinord - 11/17/10 at 2:02pm
post #6 of 6

I worked for years as a technician at a major ski shop, and my rule of thumb for my own skis is to always get a high quality machine tune at the beginning of the season, and then hand-tune them for the rest of the season.  It's just like a regular service interval with a car.

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