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What's a good ski-car tire that'll rack up most of it's miles on road (Jeep Cherokee)

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hi guys.  My '95 Cherokee is used for camping and mountain biking in the summer, and skiing & as my snow car in the winter.  I live in Albuquerque, and most of the time the roads are dry...cold in the morning, up to 40's in the afternoon.   It's a 3-hour drive to Taos, most of the time on dry highways.  I'm a little disappointed with my BFGoodrich T/A KO's on cold, icy roads.

 

Obviously, everyone is going to say "Get snow tires!".  Well, I did for my other car and have been disappointed.  They're fantastic in the snow, and just awful the other 98% of the miles.  Also, I don't drive this SUV enough to justify two sets of wheels and tires.  So, I'm looking for a tire that's reasonably quiet (noisy tires are exhuasting after a hard day!) and decent-handling on the highway approach (lots of windy sections, and snow tires can be SQUIRMY), but better able to handle an icy road that my old KO's, and something that'll still not be too bad in the summer, either.  If there is a snow-ish tire that can do well on dry highways and occasional warm weather road trips, I'd be interested in that.  Or, an all terrein tire that's particularly noted for it's snow and ice capabilities.

post #2 of 21

I had the KO's too on my 95 Cherokee and 2000 Cherokee and found them meh in the rain and snow. Loved the tire but they lacked where it really counted. I'm running Toyo Open country A/T on my Durango and love them.

post #3 of 21

I don't know SUV/Truck tires (car tires are another story), but I'd recommend checking out Tire Rack. They have really good reviews and comparison tests. I actually just bought tires for my car based on their recommendations. (I bought mine locally, though.)

post #4 of 21

Wrangler DuraTrac light truck tires are branded with the mountain/snowflake symbol to identify they meet industry severe snow service standards.

 

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Goodyear&tireModel=Wrangler+DuraTrac

post #5 of 21

Michelin Cross Terrains have been good for me on my Jeeps. Kind of pricey but wear forever. Gone through four CO winters with no issues. Fine in the dry.

post #6 of 21

I've ran the BFG A/T KO and liked them a lot.  That being said I've since switched to Toyo Open Country AT.  Granted mine are on a full sized pickup.  But, I spend a considerable amount of time off road.  Primarily in sugar sand and secondary in snow.  From my personal experience the Toyos ran circles around my old BFG's as far as traction goes.  Road manners and price are comperable to each other.  I think the Toyo's are a bit quieter on the highway.  I do enough highway driving that I've never made the plunge into a mud terrain.  They're all expensive enough I don't want to buy them that often.  The big suckers I run on my truck run about $1200/set either in BFG or Toyo.

post #7 of 21

I'm thinking my ski car will get some Michelin Ice X when the Duelers it came with  are done.  I live 150 miles from snow and go about 12 days a year.

post #8 of 21

What kind of snowtires did you buy for the other car?  What about them makes the drive "awful" ?

 

My experience is that a quality snowtire is not much different than a normal tire on dry pavement as long as you're not trying to drive it like a sportscar.  Perhaps a little noisier, but not by much.

 

If you don't want to buy dedicated snowtires for your jeep, I can't really help you much. " All Season" tires just suck in the snow, even one's that are touted as almost as good as real snowtires (eg Nokian WR) .

post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PAPA View Post

Wrangler DuraTrac light truck tires are branded with the mountain/snowflake symbol to identify they meet industry severe snow service standards.

 

The industry standards are ridiculously low.  Just about any crappy "all season" tire qualifies for the symbol. There is no substitute for a dedicated snow tire.

post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 

Blizzak WS-60's.  In dry, warmer (high 30's and up) conditions, they totally ruined the feel of the car.  A bit noisy, very vague and squirmy handling, much longer braking distance, and so little traction that the traction control would always kick in if I came anywhere near flooring it, even on a dry road.  Extremely fast wearing, too- lost close to half the useable tread in about 4 months.

 

You should look at the recent Edmunds "insideline.com" test on snow ties vs. summer vs. all season.  In dry, not-so-cold conditions, the snow tires had something like 30-40% more braking distance that the summer tires.  That's serisously dangerous if that's where I spend 95% of my time.  All seasons had something like 30-40% longer braking in the snow- much better than I expected.  Of course, the summer tires were worthless in snow- braking distance was 200-300% more than the others.  They were tops everywhere else though, including the rain (all-seasons did the worst in the rain)

post #11 of 21

Before I learned the engine in my truck needed replacing, I was going to buy new tires, and did a fair amount of research on the subject. The ones I was planning on buying were the General Grabbers, which were supposed to be better than average road tires among the all terrain tires, while also having an extreme weather rating for snow and ice. They are stud ready, but I was planning on going without, so they could be my year-around tires.

post #12 of 21

Studless snow tires are the way to go.  The Bridgestone Blizzack is the best I've tried.  Toyo Observes are pretty good too.  Have some Generals (forget the name)  now.   They are not as good as the two prior.

Studless snows are not for hard driving.  Of course they will wear quickly if one drives them too hard.  They are very soft to give ice traction.  But if you drive like a sane person, they might save your life, and your ride. 

Then again, you can always use chains, or cables. 

 

Studded tires suck.  The new studless tires are the way to go!

post #13 of 21
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys.  As I said in the first post, since I live in the desert, and 95% of my miles are on dry roads, pure snow tires are too big a compromise, unless you know of one that does OK off road and in the summer, too.

post #15 of 21

I have a 2005 Grand Cherokee and two seasons ago replaced the OEM's with Firestone Destination LE's.  My situtation is similar to yours; 3 hours of high speed driving on the Interstate then the possibility of deep snow.  I am very happy with the Firestones and would buy again.  Also I second the TireRack recommendation. 

post #16 of 21

If you look in that review, they suggest the Michelin Pilot Alpin for occasional snow use. However, if you plan to just use an all season tire, I'd suggest pairing with chains. You can also look at their ratings for all season tires: http://www.consumersearch.com/tires/all-season-tires

post #17 of 21

When I switched to the Duelers on my '93 Cherokee, I was fairly impressed on how well thei worked in variable conditions. In deep snow they are fine. Like you, they are on dry roads far more than not and work fine even some limited 4-wheeling above Silverton.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by carve View Post

Hi guys.  My '95 Cherokee is used for camping and mountain biking in the summer, and skiing & as my snow car in the winter.  I live in Albuquerque, and most of the time the roads are dry...cold in the morning, up to 40's in the afternoon.   It's a 3-hour drive to Taos, most of the time on dry highways.  I'm a little disappointed with my BFGoodrich T/A KO's on cold, icy roads.

 

Obviously, everyone is going to say "Get snow tires!".  Well, I did for my other car and have been disappointed.  They're fantastic in the snow, and just awful the other 98% of the miles.  Also, I don't drive this SUV enough to justify two sets of wheels and tires.  So, I'm looking for a tire that's reasonably quiet (noisy tires are exhuasting after a hard day!) and decent-handling on the highway approach (lots of windy sections, and snow tires can be SQUIRMY), but better able to handle an icy road that my old KO's, and something that'll still not be too bad in the summer, either.  If there is a snow-ish tire that can do well on dry highways and occasional warm weather road trips, I'd be interested in that.  Or, an all terrein tire that's particularly noted for it's snow and ice capabilities.

post #18 of 21

I woudl forget about snows if you are going to use these tires in warm weahter and for mostly dry desert roads.

 

Just go to tire rack looks at all season  tires and find the ones that are rated as good for light snow. Then learn how to drive your car with the limited traction you will have. Forget about ice performance you will not have much.  Buy chains as well.


Edited by tromano - 11/16/10 at 11:32am
post #19 of 21

Take a closer look at the Pirelli Scorpion ATR's. I have a set of these on my Xterra and let me tell you that I have driven over ice and through the deepest snow in various conditions. I live in Ontario, Canada and frequently drive to NY, VT and Quebec for skiing. These tires have never failed me or left me stuck or stranded.

post #20 of 21



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nix View Post

Take a closer look at the Pirelli Scorpion ATR's. I have a set of these on my Xterra and let me tell you that I have driven over ice and through the deepest snow in various conditions. I live in Ontario, Canada and frequently drive to NY, VT and Quebec for skiing. These tires have never failed me or left me stuck or stranded.

A big second here for that tire.

 

We are in the rather unique position of jumping in our Rav 4 and driving 21 hours or so to stay for a few weeks at wherever we land  (Summit County CO / Cottonwood Canyons UT / Jackson WY etc). While this tire is rated as an off-road tire you would never know you weren't riding on a highway tire on the Interstate.  Deep Snow.....so what.  Ride around on the slickest clay we have here in northern Kentucky.....so what.  Head off road camping.........yeah, so what.

 

I am about to pull the trigger on another set of these for my pick-up soon.  All my tires come via Tire Rack.  WATCH the ratings on this tire.  CAREFULLY study the weight ratings along with the possible sizes that can fit your vehicle and you may be surprised to find you can get the tire with a tougher load capacity by making a minimal size change.  I just spotted this and the tire that is slightly larger with a higher load capacity is actually cheaper than the original replacement size and all I did was change from a 265-65-17 to a 265-70-17 and it raises the truck a fraction of an inch.

 

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by carve View Post

Thanks guys.  As I said in the first post, since I live in the desert, and 95% of my miles are on dry roads, pure snow tires are too big a compromise, unless you know of one that does OK off road and in the summer, too.


Chains & Cables for you!  Don't risk you life on snow, and ice.  The life you save may not be your own!
 

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › What's a good ski-car tire that'll rack up most of it's miles on road (Jeep Cherokee)