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$200 boots vs. $500 boots - Page 2

post #31 of 43

I have a very narrow boney heel and a very wide ball of foot, made even wider by years of kicking things. 

 

Return the $200 boots.

 

Find a recommended boot fitter that will put you in a boot the right length that that fits your heel and have the toe box stretched. 

post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I have a very narrow boney heel and a very wide ball of foot, made even wider by years of kicking things. 

 

Return the $200 boots.

 

Find a recommended boot fitter that will put you in a boot the right length that that fits your heel and have the toe box stretched. 


Those Canadians are so smart!!! Why didnt we think of that?? see a boot fitter.

GL and have a great season
 

post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by (Private User) View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Sorry if I seem gruff, I'm actually trying to help you by being blunt and truthful.



I honestly prefer it that way, I dislike it when things are presented in a roundabout way.

Actually you don't prefer it that way, because everyone on this thread save one has recommended that you return the boots, and several have explained why. Yet you keep coming back to the $$ as a reason not to. 

 

For the record, I have duck feet, as bad or worse than yours in terms of narrow heels and wide forefeet. And I get a 97-98 last, commence with the stretching. End up around 102-103. That's the fit that will guarantee that my heel stays put. As several said, a loose heel - and these boots will get significantly looser over the course of the season - will mess up your skiing a lot more than a mediocre ski. So you need to find a boot that fits your HEEL/ANKLE, then work with the rest. I've never even heard of a 105 last; think how your heel and ankle - which transmit most of the force to your skis - will be swimming around after you've packed these babies out. And I'd bet the liners are nice and cushy, very quick to compress. 

 

OK, now go keep them, and figure out all the $$ you'll save when you have to buy a new pair in a season or two...
 

post #34 of 43

Sounds like you would've been happier having never continued boot shopping after buying a pair, eh?  Call it what you want - buyer's remorse, etc - but you haven't even skied in them and you're already looking for other boots?

 

I hate buying new boots, because the fit in the store is never the same as on the slopes.  It takes about 3-4 days of skiing to get the boots to start packing in and starting to feel comfortable.  At that point, I can identify any problem areas and correct them.

post #35 of 43


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by calisnow View Post

In response to your previous post - it is really obvious from what you've written that the $500 boots are fitting you better than the $200 boots.  I know cash is tight - I was a broke student as well.  But this $300 difference will be amortized over many, many ski days if the boots fit you right.

 

And one BIG problem to worry about is that if those $200 boots feel even slightly loose in the heel right now after never having skied in them - just WAIT until you have 10-20 days on them.  Those cheapo liners will pack out and you will be flopping all around in that boot - then you'll be clamping down on the shell trying to compensate, causing you to cut off your circulation (making your feet cold), pinch nerves (resulting in things like numb toes), and of course you will NEVER have the level of control on your skis that you would have with properly fitting boots.

 

Don't take this lightly.  Yes I'm trying to scare you - from one mag who has been down this road with cheap boots to save cash to another mag who hopefully can avoid these mistakes.

 

Plus if you blow $200 on these and then have to buy others - well guess what, now it cost you MORE money.

 

And in response to saving money to spend it skiing - well yeah but if you are in pain and/or you can't develop your skills because of ill fitting boots then you won't want to ski anyway.

 

Suck it up and be a man - these are the years you eat ramen noodles to have good fitting boots.  Anything worth doing is worth doing right - ESPECIALLY SKI BOOTS.

 

 

This is VERY good advice.
 

post #36 of 43

Why thank you bbinder, I did my best. biggrin.gif

post #37 of 43


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by (Private User) View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

you know the answer to your question, you just don't want to accept it. 



What if I can't afford it? Like I have a budget (self imposed), and I would have to spend my left over entertainment money for the next year or so if I got the $500 boots, after already springing for skis and the colorado pass.


A ill-fitting pair of boots....just cause you want to stick to your budget is like trying to win the Indy 500 by driving a Geo Metro! 

 

I FINALLY bucked up and invested in a good pair of boots this season.  The MSRP was around $680 or so and I paid $480 for them.  I have yet to ski them but I know that they will be better than my last pair of $200 boots that were two sizes too big for me! 

post #38 of 43
Thread Starter 

Ok well I've decided that I'm going to go ahead and shop around more for boots etc, and return the pair I currently have. The reason is that I just want to make sure there aren't other boots out there to fit me, maybe the selection at that particular store was limited, and if need be I'll spring for the more expensive boots.

post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by (Private User) View Post

The reason is that I just want to make sure there aren't other boots out there to fit me, maybe the selection at that particular store was limited, and if need be I'll spring for the more expensive boots.

Nobody online can tell you that. You're going to have to do the legwork and visit retailers in person, keeping your own notes on what fits right and what fits like a bathtub.

If you _do_ decide to spend more time and effort on this, you might keep an open mind as to trying "chickie" gear.
post #40 of 43

Having just bought my 3rd pair of boots in less than a year I vote for the better fitting boots. My first boots were a huge mistake but the second pair actually felt quite good until the liner packed out and it became really irritating to ski with my heels and ankles just swimming around in the boots. So instead of having spent the 450 euros or something for well fitting boots right in the beginning I've spent more than twice that...

post #41 of 43
Reading back through this thread I think the OP may have wished for either some sort of biomechanical cookie* type generalization on the skiing behavior of too-big boots or an engineering synopsis** of the compromises in low-price-point boots.

*TM Weems
**of the "polypropylene is a cheap plastic but not exactly ideal for boots" type, perhaps
post #42 of 43

As many have said, going to a shop you trust and getting advice there, is the best way to go.

 

I have 3 recommendations since you live in Boulder.

 

The first I would recommend is: http://www.larrybootfitting.com/ One of the best boot fitters around. Be ready to spend at least a couple of hours there. That's where I get most of my fitting done.

 

The second I would recommend is http://www.alpinebaseandedge.com/. Ask for Peter (the owner) Peter servers a lot of ski racers but he also has touring boots in stock. We spent about 1.5 getting my son fitted with his race boots there about a month ago (Larry above doesn't have racing boots for kids). My son says this pair is working so much better than last years pair which we got fitted at a different shop (not recommended here.)

 

The third recommendation is Christy Sports on 30th Street (303) 442-2493. Ask for Shawn. He would be the best boot fitter there.

 

Good luck and see on the hill :)

post #43 of 43

It's really  a question of spending 200 now and 500 in a year or two or 500 now. Good boots can really last a while. If you need to save get used skis.

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