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$200 boots vs. $500 boots

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 

I picked up a a pair of boots for $200. I didn't really have anyone help me out with them that much, they were at a clearance sale from last seasons gear. The boots fit pretty well, and I liked them. So far I've only ever used rental ski boots however, so I don't really know how ski boots are supposed to feel. The MRSP on the boots was $425 I think.

 

Just to make sure I picked up the right boots I headed down to the local ski shop, and asked them to pick out a pair of boots for me. They said that the boots I picked didn't work because of the fact that the heel did not fit properly into the boot. I was kind of unsure about this as well when I picked out the boots, but I found out by tightening down the strap I can get it to fit. The main reason was that the front of my foot is a medium fit while the back (heel) is very small and bony.

 

Hence the local ski shop suggested I purchase a pair of $500 boots. They were this seasons boots and they were $700 MSRP. The difference between the two boots is the $500 one felt like an extension of my foot and the $200 one felt more or less like a ski boot. As far as my skiing abilities go, I used to go a lot three years ago. I couldn't go for the last 3 years because I was a student with a job in the winter, which prevented me from skiing. When I was able to ski a lot I was going down a lot of steep mountains, moguls, powder, and occasionally I did things in the park as well. I would ski blacks/double blacks fairly well, I might occasonally crash on a double black if I went too fast. I would say I was intermediete, maybe leaning on the advanced side.

 

Anyways I also did all of those things with the terrible rental skis, I've never owned skis before. So I just want to know is the $300 between the two boots worth it or not?

post #2 of 43

Welcome to Epic!

 

Most good skiers will tell you that a proper fitting boot is the most important piece of gear.  For most serious skiers, that is worth $300.  It sounds like the $500 boot is better for you, but an experienced boot fitter would be able to shed more light on this.  Not sure where you live, but your local ski shop may or may not have a skilled boot fitter- shop salesmen vary from clueless to good with many of the top fitters living in and around ski areas.  Might be useful to post in the boot forum or check the Epic recommended boot fitters list. 

post #3 of 43

What an odd question.....

Not knowing what boots you bought and what you are looking at, what your foots shaped like and such it makes it really hard to tell you anything about what you have and what you are looking at.

Here is as good an answear as I can give. You should find a ski shop that you feel good about with people you can trust, tell them your situation and your price point. We can all ski in equipment that costs less or more, costing more doesnt insure a better product but at some point the price range will probibly relate to a " good product for you". I probibly tend to over spend on my boots, I do though know how I want my feet to feel inside the boot to transfer my body energy to my equipment. ( your ideal boot is probibly way different then mine)

Find a shop and work with them, sorry I couldnt say save your cash or spend your cash.

Go see a shop, did I mention it would be a good idea to work with a shop?

Once you get to know what works for you it will be easier.

GL and have a great winter

post #4 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post

Welcome to Epic!

 

Most good skiers will tell you that a proper fitting boot is the most important piece of gear.  For most serious skiers, that is worth $300.  It sounds like the $500 boot is better for you, but an experienced boot fitter would be able to shed more light on this.  Not sure where you live, but your local ski shop may or may not have a skilled boot fitter- shop salesmen vary from clueless to good with many of the top fitters living in and around ski areas.  Might be useful to post in the boot forum or check the Epic recommended boot fitters list. 

I live in Boulder Colorado so hopefully there are skilled boot fitters. The shop salesman told me that at my level I didn't need the $500 boot persay, but that that was the only one that could actually fit my foot, so I was kind of confused by that. Out of all the boots I tried on that one did fit the best however. The store I went to was Boulder Ski Deals, which I've heard things about.

 

The boots he recommended were these : http://www.trusnow.com/Rossignol-Squad-Sensor-90-Ski-Boots.asp Rossignol Squad Sensors. The boots I picked up were Tecnica Mega Fit 10s.

 

The problem is I'm not sure if I'm a serious skier or not, and if its worth it or not. I'll probably go up about 10-15 times this year, once every other weekend or once every weekend something in between that.
 

post #5 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boot View Post

What an odd question.....

Not knowing what boots you bought and what you are looking at, what your foots shaped like and such it makes it really hard to tell you anything about what you have and what you are looking at.

Here is as good an answear as I can give. You should find a ski shop that you feel good about with people you can trust, tell them your situation and your price point. We can all ski in equipment that costs less or more, costing more doesnt insure a better product but at some point the price range will probibly relate to a " good product for you". I probibly tend to over spend on my boots, I do though know how I want my feet to feel inside the boot to transfer my body energy to my equipment. ( your ideal boot is probibly way different then mine)

Find a shop and work with them, sorry I couldnt say save your cash or spend your cash.

Go see a shop, did I mention it would be a good idea to work with a shop?

Once you get to know what works for you it will be easier.

GL and have a great winter



Well I have odd feet apparently. Like I said the front part of my foot is wide, but I have a very small heel. Basically I'm a lot of skin and bones.

 

The two boots are Tecnica Mega 10 Ultra Fit, and Rosignol Squad Sensor 90 (http://www.trusnow.com/Rossignol-Squad-Sensor-90-Ski-Boots.asp)

post #6 of 43
Thread Starter 

Ok I've replied to this a couple of times not sure why the reply did not go through.

 

My feet are apparently odd because the front part is significantly wider then the heel. I have a very small bony heel or something like that. The boots I picked out were the Tecnica Mega 10 ultra fit. The boots selected for me were the Rosgnol Squad Sensor 90 boots.

 

The thing was the fitter mentioned that all the boots in the $300 to $500 price point were essentially the same performance, the main difference was that this boot would fit me better, just because of the shape of the boot corresponding to my foot. What confused me about that was how there was not a cheaper boot that corresponded to my foot. My budget was around $300 for the boots, I could go up a little, but $500 is a stretch to me.

 

Like I said before I don't really know how better equipment will help me, mainly because I've been skiing in cheap rental gear whenever I've gone up before, and I've skied moderately well (double blacks, moguls, glades) with those rental skis. Obviously I'm not great, I would say intermediete

 

Also I live in Boulder Colorado so I'm close to a lot of major skiing areas like Vail, Breckenridge, Copper, etc. So do you know of a good place to go around here?

post #7 of 43

 So I just want to know is the $300 between the two boots worth it or not?



yes.

post #8 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Crab View Post



 So I just want to know is the $300 between the two boots worth it or not?



yes.


Doesn't help me that much unless I know why. Also I would probably go up 10 or so times, maybe 15 I'm really not sure at this point.

post #9 of 43

you know the answer to your question, you just don't want to accept it. 

post #10 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

you know the answer to your question, you just don't want to accept it. 



What if I can't afford it? Like I have a budget (self imposed), and I would have to spend my left over entertainment money for the next year or so if I got the $500 boots, after already springing for skis and the colorado pass.

post #11 of 43

Find a shop you feel you can trust and work with you. A good shop you will go back to for years, at first they dont make a lot of cash off you but over time as you earn more and progress your level you will spend more with them and use less of there time. I am skiing in Head Mojo wich listed for 899 at the time and I got a years earlier for 399. Now these just happen to fit and I happen to find a shop with a pair from the year before. so talk to a few shops find one that is willing to spend some time on you and GL and have a fun winter

post #12 of 43

$300 is one years worth of entertainment money? REALLY???

 

Look, you can ski on the $200 boots, you can ski on a pair of $25 ski swap used rental shop boots... maybe you should think of the $200 on the obviously wrong boot is $200 too much, not a $300 savings. It's your money, do what you want, but in the long run I'm confident that the extra money will be money well spent, the cheap option is good money thrown away.

post #13 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

$300 is one years worth of entertainment money? REALLY???

 

Look, you can ski on the $200 boots, you can ski on a pair of $25 ski swap used rental shop boots... maybe you should think of the $200 on the obviously wrong boot is $200 too much, not a $300 savings. It's your money, do what you want, but in the long run I'm confident that the extra money will be money well spent, the cheap option is good money thrown away.
 

Wow $300 is my left over entertainment cash after I already bought skis, Colorado pass, other stuff, till end of the year etc, plus I just graduated from school (engineering) so I have to buy a ton of stuff and save cash. I'm just pointing out that $300 is quite a bit for me.

post #14 of 43

Well my oppinion is a little different.  If you are comfortable in the boot you purchased compared to the rental boots you would have to wear if you didn't buy them as you can't afford the $500.00 boots then they were worth purchasing.  If they are really too loose and your heal is coming out worse then when you had rental boots, sell them on Craigs list for what ever you can get.  I sold a pair of Technica's last year that I was fitted for by a professional boot fitter who knew me and my skiing very well and had done every pro deal for me for years, and we just got it wrong.  They felt right in the store and i crushed them on the hill and they were sloppy.  I didn't have the heart to tell my friend/ boot guy so I just sold them to someone that they did seem to fit well on Craig's list after wearing them once for about 150.00.  Got me some of my money back. 

 

If these boots feel better then the rentals and you can ski in them you will either make up the 200.00 not renting or you will get to ski more then you would have if you had to pay for the boot rental each time you were going.  I know very well what it is like to have to count every penny and be willing to do what you have to do what you love to do.  A little discomfort is easy to ignore when you are getting to do what you love way more then you would have.

 

When you can afford it,  you will never regret getting a pair that fits you well, but I happen to have a very similar problem, a very boney narrow heal, along with long narrow boney toes and a wide bridge at the front.  My current boots (paid for in a shop and fitted), also foot bed and more custom fitting done in Vail, still hurt my two toes on one foot (always a problem for me) depending on the snow conditions, so you may find nothing is perfect. My perfect was 1000.00 in 1994 for foam blown into a leather liner (Dachstein v3's), while I didn't move on a slope for 30 minutes while foam set up around my bare feet, and a custom foot bed, since then,and the second liner I had blown, nothing has fit really correctly and I will probablly need Strolz to get my fit again.  I will live right now with the best I can do for the money I can afford, my Head Dream Thang, custom foot bed, and extra fitting that still leaves me in some pain. 

 

I love to ski, so it's all okay and I'll take a bad fitting boot and ski time any day over a boot that fits and no ski time.

post #15 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lady_Salina View Post

Well my oppinion is a little different.  If you are comfortable in the boot you purchased compared to the rental boots you would have to wear if you didn't buy them as you can't afford the $500.00 boots then they were worth purchasing.  If they are really too loose and your heal is coming out worse then when you had rental boots, sell them on Craigs list for what ever you can get.  I sold a pair of Technica's last year that I was fitted for by a professional boot fitter who knew me and my skiing very well and had done every pro deal for me for years, and we just got it wrong.  They felt right in the store and i crushed them on the hill and they were sloppy.  I didn't have the heart to tell my friend/ boot guy so I just sold them to someone that they did seem to fit well on Craig's list after wearing them once for about 150.00.  Got me some of my money back. 

 

If these boots feel better then the rentals and you can ski in them you will either make up the 200.00 not renting or you will get to ski more then you would have if you had to pay for the boot rental each time you were going.  I know very well what it is like to have to count every penny and be willing to do what you have to do what you love to do.  A little discomfort is easy to ignore when you are getting to do what you love way more then you would have.

 

When you can afford it,  you will never regret getting a pair that fits you well, but I happen to have a very similar problem, a very boney narrow heal, along with long narrow boney toes and a wide bridge at the front.  My current boots (paid for in a shop and fitted), also foot bed and more custom fitting done in Vail, still hurt my two toes on one foot (always a problem for me) depending on the snow conditions, so you may find nothing is perfect. My perfect was 1000.00 in 1994 for foam blown into a leather liner (Dachstein v3's), while I didn't move on a slope for 30 minutes while foam set up around my bare feet, and a custom foot bed, since then,and the second liner I had blown, nothing has fit really correctly and I will probablly need Strolz to get my fit again.  I will live right now with the best I can do for the money I can afford, my Head Dream Thang, custom foot bed, and extra fitting that still leaves me in some pain. 

 

I love to ski, so it's all okay and I'll take a bad fitting boot and ski time any day over a boot that fits and no ski time.


In comparision to the rental boot the $200 boots feel great, the best boots I had ever tried on. I haven't skiied in them however, and I bought them 3 days ago, so I can still return them. Obviously however rental boots are not very good. Still the $200 boots (Tecnica Mega Ultra Fit 10s) were quite a bit more comfortable then any of the other boots at the clearance sale, and were more comfortable then any boot I've worn before.

 

The difference with the $500 boots was they felt more like part of my foot, it didn't feel like I had a ski boot on persay, and they felt pretty nice on my feet, it almost didn't feel like I had a ski boot on it felt like I had an extension to my leg.

 

If $300 was more readily available I would obviously just plop it down. But my parents have always taught me to save cash, and spend money wisely so I'm trying to do my best at that living on my own. Its not like its physically impossible for me to spend $300, it would just take away from other things, so I'm not sure if its a wise decision.

post #16 of 43

To the OP - your questions as to why you can't find a cheap boot that fits as well is a perfectly logical question - and one I asked also of my bootfitters on my long and painful journey to boots that fit.  I had originally done just what you did - pick out my own clearance boots trying to save some cash.

 

The answer I got to your question is that more serious skiers want boots that fit right - which means more conforming to your foot.  However people who are buying less expensive boots are less serious skiers and generally want looser fitting boots.  Hence the cheaper boots don't fit as snugly.  Maye this is the real explanation, maybe it's not.

 

However I will tell you that properly fitting boots will do more to improve your skiing that almost anything else.  If you got a pass then that means you'll be traveling to ski towns - ask around on these forums and others (even the one with all the attitude that makes fun of epicskiers all the time) for bootfitter recommendations near the resort you'll be going to.  That person will probably work in a shop where you can rent the boots and ski on them before deciding to buy - this is called a "demo."  It's a rental, but of this season's high end equipment.  Often the stores will give you a few days rental credit if you decide to purchase that model.

 

Better to go too small than too big - liners pack out over time (especially cheap liners) and you can always have any pressure points in the boot baked/ground/punched out etc. by a good fitter.

 

I'll say it again - a properly fitting boot (NO HEEL LIFT) is the  MOST IMPORTANT part of skiing.  More than lessons (I may take crap for this statement by I stand by it) and coaching even.

 

If you are having to strap down your cheap boots to prevent heel lift that will only lead to other problems and lots of pain.

 

I spent $700 on my boots, plus cork beds, plus zip fit liner, plus heaters.  BOOTS ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF SKIING.  Please listen to what people are telling you.  And demo boots before you buy them - a good boot fitter is a necessity, but it is not sufficient - you need to ski on them also.

 

However if you aren't willing to go to that trouble of demoing, etc. - then at least buy the $500 boots that fit, as you said, "like an extension of my foot" instead of the ones you have to clamp down.  If they fit properly you'll have them for years.  I buy new skis every season but I stick with the same properly fitted boots year after year.

 

Okay, any questions? :)

post #17 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by calisnow View Post

To the OP - your questions as to why you can't find a cheap boot that fits as well is a perfectly logical question - and one I asked also of my bootfitters on my long and painful journey to boots that fit.  I had originally done just what you did - pick out my own clearance boots trying to save some cash.

 

The answer I got to your question is that more serious skiers want boots that fit right - which means more conforming to your foot.  However people who are buying less expensive boots are less serious skiers and generally want looser fitting boots.  Hence the cheaper boots don't fit as snugly.  Maye this is the real explanation, maybe it's not.

 

However I will tell you that properly fitting boots will do more to improve your skiing that almost anything else.  If you got a pass then that means you'll be traveling to ski towns - ask around on these forums and others (even the one with all the attitude that makes fun of epicskiers all the time) for bootfitter recommendations near the resort you'll be going to.  That person will probably work in a shop where you can rent the boots and ski on them before deciding to buy - this is called a "demo."  It's a rental, but of this season's high end equipment.  Often the stores will give you a few days rental credit if you decide to purchase that model.

 

Better to go too small than too big - liners pack out over time (especially cheap liners) and you can always have any pressure points in the boot baked/ground/punched out etc. by a good fitter.

 

I'll say it again - a properly fitting boot (NO HEEL LIFT) is the  MOST IMPORTANT part of skiing.  More than lessons (I may take crap for this statement by I stand by it) and coaching even.

 

If you are having to strap down your cheap boots to prevent heel lift that will only lead to other problems and lots of pain.

 

I spent $700 on my boots, plus cork beds, plus zip fit liner, plus heaters.  BOOTS ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF SKIING.  Please listen to what people are telling you.  And demo boots before you buy them - a good boot fitter is a necessity, but it is not sufficient - you need to ski on them also.

 

However if you aren't willing to go to that trouble of demoing, etc. - then at least buy the $500 boots that fit, as you said, "like an extension of my foot" instead of the ones you have to clamp down.  If they fit properly you'll have them for years.  I buy new skis every season but I stick with the same properly fitted boots year after year.

 

Okay, any questions? :)



Ok this is starting to make sense. The only thing was I thought $500 boots were really for "expert" skiiers, not people like me who ski blacks and moguls and things like that, but people who go up to the mountains 2-3 times a week and laugh at anything the mountains have to offer. When I was first shopping around, a friend told me that at my level $300 to $350 was a good target range to spend.

 

Yeah there is definitely heal lift with the $200 boots, it is significantly less then rental boots, but my heel will lift up. This is because as I said my heel is a lot smaller then the rest of my body.

post #18 of 43

In response to your previous post - it is really obvious from what you've written that the $500 boots are fitting you better than the $200 boots.  I know cash is tight - I was a broke student as well.  But this $300 difference will be amortized over many, many ski days if the boots fit you right.

 

And one BIG problem to worry about is that if those $200 boots feel even slightly loose in the heel right now after never having skied in them - just WAIT until you have 10-20 days on them.  Those cheapo liners will pack out and you will be flopping all around in that boot - then you'll be clamping down on the shell trying to compensate, causing you to cut off your circulation (making your feet cold), pinch nerves (resulting in things like numb toes), and of course you will NEVER have the level of control on your skis that you would have with properly fitting boots.

 

Don't take this lightly.  Yes I'm trying to scare you - from one mag who has been down this road with cheap boots to save cash to another mag who hopefully can avoid these mistakes.

 

Plus if you blow $200 on these and then have to buy others - well guess what, now it cost you MORE money.

 

And in response to saving money to spend it skiing - well yeah but if you are in pain and/or you can't develop your skills because of ill fitting boots then you won't want to ski anyway.

 

Suck it up and be a man - these are the years you eat ramen noodles to have good fitting boots.  Anything worth doing is worth doing right - ESPECIALLY SKI BOOTS.

post #19 of 43

Part of the problem here is that you asked for opinions but when you get opinions that don't support what you've already done you say you can't afford to do anything else.  If that's true, why are you even asking?  As far as I'm concerned you wasted money on skis and boots, because you really need to buy boots first.  Boots that fit your feet is the most important investment you make in skiing.  I'll be spending time with a boot fitter in early December and having custom foot beds made that cost about what your boots cost.  Is that investment worth it?  Absolutely.  I have high arches and off the shelf foot beds don't have the support I need because I spend a lot of time in my boots.

post #20 of 43

Just be careful that they feel great because they fit and not feel great because they are comfortably fitting like a shoe.  Rarely does a properly fitted boot feel great on the foot as they should be snug, touch you foot all over, should should not be able to lift your heal out easily when standing in them (snug on foot top, sides, touching around ankle) realizing that you will flatten the inner liner relatively quickly, leaving more room, and on warm days the boot shell will be softer leaving more flex.  Usually there will be a few fit issues that a boot fitter can fix up to give you the best fit possible, starting with a boot that is as close to a good fit as they can find for your price point.   As I said, my boots I sold actually felt great, it wasn't until I skiied them I realized the flex pattern of the boot was too soft for my skiing style.   

 

The more expensive boots sound like they were a possibly a really great fit, very rare to find and would need little work from a fitter to adjust them.  You will look a long time to find a fit like that and for that reason may consider purchasing them.  One more thought on the boots you did buy... You will probably learn a little over the winter about what you should feel in a fit by the issues you have with fit, and may be more knowledgeable yourself on what you need when you go for your next pair.  If you really can swing the 300.00 and go without something else, the 500.00 boot will probably last you a few years, the 200.00 boot, if it isn't a perfect fit, you will replace in a year or so when you have some savings, and feel more comfortable about spending what you have.  You could look around for a buy on the model that was more expensive that you liked so miuch also.  I have never been disappointed at spending extra and getting something great.

post #21 of 43

In response to what you said about $500 boots being for "expert" skiers - it's really not about the price point, it's about the fit.  As a very general rule the pricier boots are going to have more snug precise fits for any given foot size.  It's not that we're trying to get you to spend money - we're trying to get you to get boots that fit.

 

You're an engineer right?  So you should be able to understand this - the more precise the fit of the boot, the more directly your body's energy will be transmitted to the snow, and the more you will be able to control the skis with small adjustments, and the more you will feel exactly what the snow is doing under your feet.

 

Imagine driving an old cadillac with blown shocks vs a BMW 3 series with a highly tuned suspension.  It's like night and day.

 

Even you, at your ability level, will immediately notice the difference in control you have with well fitting boots.

 

One response you might have is to wait until this year's stuff goes on sale - that's a good strategy with many items, but the problem with ski boots is that they very likely will not have the size you need by spring.  Shops have to pre-order their shipments and many times cannot get more during the winter.  So when they're gone, they're gone.

 

Believe me I try to save cash - I buy used skis.  I look for clothing at deep discounts.  But I never try to save money on my feet.  Don't take my word for it - keep doing research on the importance of boots and you'll hear the same thing over and over.

 

Best strategy - see for yourself.  Go to a shop and demo some properly fitted boots on your first trip this season and you'll see for yourself what good fit does for your skiing.

post #22 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

Part of the problem here is that you asked for opinions but when you get opinions that don't support what you've already done you say you can't afford to do anything else.  If that's true, why are you even asking?  As far as I'm concerned you wasted money on skis and boots, because you really need to buy boots first.  Boots that fit your feet is the most important investment you make in skiing.  I'll be spending time with a boot fitter in early December and having custom foot beds made that cost about what your boots cost.  Is that investment worth it?  Absolutely.  I have high arches and off the shelf foot beds don't have the support I need because I spend a lot of time in my boots.


 

Well I could buy them, it is physically possible, its just "$300 is a lot of money". Also for my Skis, I was able to buy used 10 K2 Extreme Twin Tips ($600 MSRP) with $200 Marker Bindings for $175 total, so I got a super good deal on those. They were obviously a good deal, and I couldn't find anything that was a better value. Also I don't know if the $200 boots are really $200 boots, the MSRP is $425 (last season) while the MSRP on the $500 boots is $660 (current season).

 

However from what people are saying it sounds like it might be worth it to just suck up the $300 extra and pay for the $500 boots because the fit is worth it. I might not be able to use the extra "features" but I suppose the fit is worth it.

post #23 of 43
In your first post it sounds like you already bought the $200 boots, so unless you can return them and get your money back you're talking about $500 extra not $300. In that case I would ski on the cheap boots for a while and set aside the cash for a more researched purchase at a future time.
post #24 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff2010 View Post

In your first post it sounds like you already bought the $200 boots, so unless you can return them and get your money back you're talking about $500 extra not $300. In that case I would ski on the cheap boots for a while and set aside the cash for a more researched purchase at a future time.


Well I have a 30 day return policy, and I haven't skiied on them so I can return them.

post #25 of 43

 

Does anyone responding to this thread know what a Tecnica Mega10 boot IS??? Let me clue you in, it is a 105mm lasted boot (that is HUGE), the name 'Mega' refers to the volume... it's enormous. OP has a narrow, bony heel... giant boot + narrow heel = terrible idea, ever heard the phrase "throwing a hotdog down a hallway" ?

 

I'm not telling you to buy the $500 boot, you are presenting this as if these two boots are the only two in existence, that is not the case. $200 on a boot that you know doesn't fit is a $200 waste, somewhere in your well-educated engineer brain you know that to be true. Find a solution, it doesn't have to mean spending 2.5x more, it just means buying a boot that fits better.

 

(by the way, 3 seconds with my friend Mr.Google and I located your $200 'deal' for $179... does it still seem like a bargain that you can't pass up?)

post #26 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

 

Does anyone responding to this thread know what a Tecnica Mega10 boot IS??? Let me clue you in, it is a 105mm lasted boot (that is HUGE), the name 'Mega' refers to the volume... it's enormous. OP has a narrow, bony heel... giant boot + narrow heel = terrible idea, ever heard the phrase "throwing a hotdog down a hallway" ?

 

I'm not telling you to buy the $500 boot, you are presenting this as if these two boots are the only two in existence, that is not the case. $200 on a boot that you know doesn't fit is a $200 waste, somewhere in your well-educated engineer brain you know that to be true. Find a solution, it doesn't have to mean spending 2.5x more, it just means buying a boot that fits better.

 

(by the way, 3 seconds with my friend Mr.Google and I located your $200 'deal' for $179... does it still seem like a bargain that you can't pass up?)

Well I didn't want to buy a boot of Mr. Google for the reason that returning it is a major pain. I don't think its a bargain, and I know there are other boots out there. However as I said at that particular ski shop none of them actually fit me properly. Hence the store presented the other boot as the only other option. Obviously however, I think I should shop around more explore other boots that fit me at other stores, because hopefully there are other boots that can work for me. I do realize I kind of thought that way (thinking of only two options) so clearly thats something I have to explore more. That is also a problem I have, somehow ignoring other options for a solution to a problem.

 

I would be fine buying skis etc online, but for boots I kind of like B&M. Also I realize I fit myself really bad, because I've never used anything other then rental boots.
 

post #27 of 43

Sorry if I seem gruff, I'm actually trying to help you by being blunt and truthful.

post #28 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Sorry if I seem gruff, I'm actually trying to help you by being blunt and truthful.



I prefer that approach rather then beating around the bush.

post #29 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Sorry if I seem gruff, I'm actually trying to help you by being blunt and truthful.



I prefer that to beating around the bush.

post #30 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Sorry if I seem gruff, I'm actually trying to help you by being blunt and truthful.



I honestly prefer it that way, I dislike it when things are presented in a roundabout way.

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