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Help with selection of ski poles. - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Thread Starter 

OK, I have read all your comments I think that if I am going to pay for a feature, that feature should be an adjustable pole.  I have read many differing opinions on length and have decided that I may change my mind about what I want more than once, especially while learning.  Since I may not know the proper length right now, perhaps I should go with an adjustable and see which length works best for me.  However, it seems that it is only about $30 more to get these with triggers (at least for me, the lekis I have found don't go short enough for my wife). So, I might as well just get those.  I know we have spent some time looking for poles a couple of times so the triggers should avoid that problem.

 

There are still a few questions on this though:

Do the trigger systems eliminate the possibility of breaking your wrist or hurting your hand with a strap?

If so, do they still stay clipped on when you fall regularly and there is not enough force to break your wrist (i.e., do they fall off to easily)?

 

Do the straps just fit over your existing glove?

If so, do they inhibit the dexterity of the glove (i.e., can I just clip off the pole and use my glove hand as easily as if I did not have the strap on it)?

 

How easy is it to clip on and off?

 

I have also noticed that the adjustable poles sometimes are refered to as back country ski poles, will these fit my needs (I assume I cannot use the trekking poles.)?

 

 

I have also looked at the K2 lockjaw series, but they are only $20 less than the Lekis

post #32 of 45

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

The old method of grip the pole upside down with basket under hand and extend to floor works pretty well.

For down hill skiing too short is better than too long, especially if you venture into bumps.

Don't wear the straps!

 

Pistol grips feel great, but apparently present added risk of wrist and shoulder injury as they don't release as easily from your grasp in a tumble.

 

Carbon and bamboo might give you some added shock absorption, but I wouldn't pay $$$ for it.  I would just get some poles from the local thrift shop.

 

That is all.


Quote:

Originally Posted by esumsea View Post

OK, I have read all your comments I think that if I am going to pay for a feature, that feature should be an adjustable pole.  I have read many differing opinions on length and have decided that I may change my mind about what I want more than once, especially while learning.  Since I may not know the proper length right now, perhaps I should go with an adjustable and see which length works best for me.  However, it seems that it is only about $30 more to get these with triggers (at least for me, the lekis I have found don't go short enough for my wife). So, I might as well just get those.  I know we have spent some time looking for poles a couple of times so the triggers should avoid that problem.

 

There are still a few questions on this though:

Do the trigger systems eliminate the possibility of breaking your wrist or hurting your hand with a strap?

If so, do they still stay clipped on when you fall regularly and there is not enough force to break your wrist (i.e., do they fall off to easily)?

 

Do the straps just fit over your existing glove?

If so, do they inhibit the dexterity of the glove (i.e., can I just clip off the pole and use my glove hand as easily as if I did not have the strap on it)?

 

How easy is it to clip on and off?

 

I have also noticed that the adjustable poles sometimes are refered to as back country ski poles, will these fit my needs (I assume I cannot use the trekking poles.)?

 

 

I have also looked at the K2 lockjaw series, but they are only $20 less than the Lekis


Forget about adjustables and any other features. Just buy basic Scott aluminum poles $10-25 in an apropriate size (see Ghost's post above). They are bomber tough and if you don't lose them these are the last poles you may ever have to buy. As a behginner you do not need poles -- period. So you certianly don't need fancy ones. I still ski with the original poles I bought wiht my first set of skis back in 2002 or whatever. There is no reason to buy fancy poles unless you

 

A. Have money to burn

B. Want to attract thieves

C. You actually need the features special:

  1. you are touring in the BC -- adjustabe length
  2. Your wrists / hands need extra protection -- breakaway straps
  3. Want reduced swing weight for bumps -- light graphite


 

post #33 of 45


Here are my opinions--they are not influenced by my gripes about Leki's aggressive pricing strategy.
 

 

-- Do the trigger systems eliminate the possibility of breaking your wrist or hurting your hand with a strap?

 

I doubt it. I think they will prevent your shoulder from being pulled out of the socket or going into a spin if you snag a pole while skiing in the trees. But it takes an upward pull to disengage the strap from the pole. If you were to push down on the pole, the strap will not disengage.

 

It is a vertical release and takes a significant amount of force--enough force that I was worried about tearing the strap when I first tried to test this by getting them to disengage. So, basically the answer is--they may prevent injury in certain cases.

 

Without seeing stats, I would be skeptical of the claim that they will provide any additional safety in a standard, palms-down fall. Your hand is still attached to the pole, there is no upward force to disengage the strap, and you wrist can still fall on the grip with your thumb extended.   The best thing to do in a fall is to keep your hands bunched up and do not fall onto a flat palm--regardless of the pole you are using.

 

Basically, I would say the trigger system is probably a safer options if you ski trees quite a bit and want to use straps. The safest thing to do is not wear straps in the trees anyways, so it's probably a moot point.  

 

If so, do they still stay clipped on when you fall regularly and there is not enough force to break your wrist (i.e., do they fall off to easily)?

 

They stay clipped in unless you supply enough upward force to get past the trigger stop mechanism that the strap connects through. They do not fall off--they pull off, and not easily.  

 

Do the straps just fit over your existing glove?

 

Yes

 

If so, do they inhibit the dexterity of the glove (i.e., can I just clip off the pole and use my glove hand as easily as if I did not have the strap on it)?

 

I had no issues with dexterity. I guess it would depend on the style of glove you are using. If you have really big hands, you might find the straps to be a bit tight but I found there is a good adjustment range.

 

How easy is it to clip on and off?

 

Very easy. That's why I purchased them and why, I would assume, most people buy them--convenience.

 

I have also noticed that the adjustable poles sometimes are refered to as back country ski poles, will these fit my needs (I assume I cannot use the trekking poles.)?

 

If you can think of a situation where you will want to adjust your pole length, it might be worth considering. If not, it's probably going to be a waste of money.

 

 

 

 

 


 

post #34 of 45

My Leki's have a strap just like any other ski pole, except that it can detach from the grip if pulled hard enough (it snaps right back in) which should prevent thumb injuries. Never tried the other ones that wrap around the glove. They were a gift and I like them, but never would have spent what thet cost.

 

The reason for adjustable poles is that you need a longer pole for hiking or cross country skiing (think ski touring where the bindings have heels that can be locked and unlocked) than you do when skiing downhill. Aside from being more expensive, they are heavier than normal poles and  more attactive to potential thieves.

 

Just my opinion, but at your stage of the game, the less bells and whistles the better; buy the cheapest poles you can find with a comfortable grip. For sizing, grip under the basket as described earlier. You're a few skill levels away from where an inch longer or shorter and/or a few ounces heavier or lighter is going to make any difference.

post #35 of 45

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Forget about adjustables and any other features. Just buy basic Scott aluminum poles $10-25 in an apropriate size (see Ghost's post above). They are bomber tough and if you don't lose them these are the last poles you may ever have to buy. As a behginner you do not need poles -- period. So you certianly don't need fancy ones. I still ski with the original poles I bought wiht my first set of skis back in 2002 or whatever. There is no reason to buy fancy poles unless you

 

A. Have money to burn

B. Want to attract thieves

C. You actually need the features special:

  1. you are touring in the BC -- adjustabe length
  2. Your wrists / hands need extra protection -- breakaway straps
  3. Want reduced swing weight for bumps -- light graphite


 


Agreed.  Exactly what multiple people (including myself) have already said in this thread.  If you really, really want to spend the money no one can stop you, but I think it's a waste.

post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Forget about adjustables and any other features. Just buy basic Scott aluminum poles $10-25 in an apropriate size (see Ghost's post above). They are bomber tough and if you don't lose them these are the last poles you may ever have to buy. As a behginner you do not need poles -- period. So you certianly don't need fancy ones. I still ski with the original poles I bought wiht my first set of skis back in 2002 or whatever. There is no reason to buy fancy poles unless you

 

A. Have money to burn

B. Want to attract thieves

C. You actually need the features special:

  1. you are touring in the BC -- adjustabe length
  2. Your wrists / hands need extra protection -- breakaway straps
  3. Want reduced swing weight for bumps -- light graphite


 


Agreed.  Exactly what multiple people (including myself) have already said in this thread.  If you really, really want to spend the money no one can stop you, but I think it's a waste.


Yep. I know you guys did. And I agree with ya!

post #37 of 45

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Yep. I know you guys did. And I agree with ya!


Yeah, no worries.  I wasn't pointing out to you that you were repeating what has already been said, but was pointing out to the OP that multiple people keep telling him to save his money.  Hopefully it'll sink in.  But if not, his choice I guess.

post #38 of 45
Thread Starter 

OK, I guess I will just buy cheapy Scotts.  Maybe I will wait to get to Breck to do this.

post #39 of 45

Well, I wouldn't say spending more than average on poles is not worth it. IMO, it is worth it if and only if you will gain some signifigant practical value from the purcahse and you feel this advantage is worth paying for. The problem is, when you are realtively new to any sport, you don't have enough experience to know what is worth the extra money and what is not.

 

In the case of Leki, the question is, how much do you place on convincience of having detacheable straps? I obviously thought it was wroth a few extra dollars and I do not spend money freely on stuff I really don't need--some call it being cheap but I call it being wise.  The convinience was great and I enjoyed it. But I decided it no longer became worth it for the reasons I already noted, but that's already been stated and I won't upset mango further. Perceived safety or any other issues had nothing to do with it. I didn't even think about these issues as factors in a purchase.

 

Now, some people will purchase a high-end pole(or any kind of gear) simply because, as another poster pointed out in aother thread, there is a lot of vanity in this sport and some people will pay premium to be seen using high-end products. It also is common that people will purchase high-end gear thinking it will make them better, faster, stronger, etc.  This is true for all sports. I have seen people who purchased $7,000 Italian road bikes mount 450 gram platform pedals on the carbon cranks and ride around on the street in tennis shoes, wearing spandex race shorts and a US team jersey. Nothing wrong with all this, I guess. It's their money. Not mine.

 

 

 

 

 

post #40 of 45

Another reason I like expensive carbon poles is that they are very thin and since I slide my poles under me when I'm on the lift they are much more comfortable to sit on then the thicker aluminum poles.

 

Also as you progress in your skill level and use the poles more the light swing weight is advantageous.

post #41 of 45

I once leaned my poles on the little step bumper on back of the Subaru wagon. I got in a conversation and forgot about them, started to back out. the car wouldn't back up. I put it in park and walked around the car to see what was stopping it. my poles, wedged into the ice against the tailgate. no damage. they don't bend or brake. Aluminum poles do and it's inconvenient when it happens. IMO IMO money well spent in that mid level composite or carbon models aren't that expensive. a note: need a quiver of baskets

post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by esumsea View Post

OK, I guess I will just buy cheapy Scotts.  Maybe I will wait to get to Breck to do this.



Then they won't be cheap anymore.

post #43 of 45

I bought carbon fiber because they weren't much more than aluminum and because they don't get so cold.  The light swing weight is great, too.

post #44 of 45

Davluri and SMJ, I loled.

post #45 of 45

Buy the cheap ones and if you want to upgrade later, then you can. Like anything else it comes down to personal preference: carbon, alum, swing/balance, etc. I would recommend the shorter and as previously mentioned start with 1" shorter & then you can cut to taste after you figure it out. You could borrow/trade a longer or shorter pair for a few runs.

 

Growing up in the bumps, I tend to think most beg & intermediate skiers have too long of poles. Here's why:

1) place your arm straight down

2) now bend up it at 90 degree angle....here's where your pole is upside down and you grab it under the basket, right? Most stop here

3) now get into your skiers stance - this is where removing the 1" comes into play

 

Happy pole shopping!

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