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Tuning Heresy

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Soft snow hides a multitude of ills. I learned that again recently when gleefully skimming along on a few inches of Colorado powder, only to suddenly hit icy, scraped off patches, (thank you, boarder hordes!), and finding not only could I not keep an edge in, I could barely stay upright (and occasionally didn't). So of course I came here and started perusing the "how to ski ice" threads. Lotta wisdom for the taking, which I'm working to digest and put into practice. First and foremost the skier needs to improve, nonetheless, I'll take all the help I can get, so getting sharper edges would be a good thing.

 

I have a Razor 3-in-1 and some other basic tuning tools, but no bench or vice, and currently live in a place where I can't really set up a full blown home tuning shop inside anyway, and outside is not really an option. Snow is starting to fall on a regular basis, and soon sharp edges will be less of an issue anyway, so was thinking about how I might make do and avoid going to a shop and paying for a tune.

 

It occurred to me that if I spread some newspapers in the tiny kitchen and worked on my knees on a ski standing upright I could hold it firmly with one hand and use the Razor going top to bottom to apply some pretty consistent pressure. I was actually surprised at how well it seemed to work - much, much better than holding the ski in my lap or putting it across a couple of chairs. Pretty stable, actually. Crayon in some Hertel Hot Sauce all temp wax and buff it in/down with a scotch brite and that's my quick and dirty tune.

 

Any other heretics out there?  ;-)

post #2 of 7

 

Sounds fine.     You might be able to improve on the resulting edge slightly if the Razor can use the equivalent of a 2nd cut file.

 

About the only thing I have a quibble with is your waxing.     HHS, crayoned, is simply s l o w for CO winters, and it gets slower the colder it gets, and it gets slower the fresher the snow.       Get a small bit of blue wax and a polishing cork and you can avoid the arm and wrist aches from poling on the runouts/cat tracks. 

post #3 of 7


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

 

  Get a small bit of blue wax and a polishing cork and you can avoid the arm and wrist aches from poling on the runouts/cat tracks. 

 

That definitely works,especially in a hotel room.  You can also get a $5 thrift store iron and a $3 scraper and take a shot at hot waxing while you have the newspaper out.. the blue is best for cooler temps per wisdom above
 

post #4 of 7

My hotel room waxing set up includes:

 

Piece of plastic 7' long by 3' wide (Lowes, Home Depot have roles of 3' wide plastic)

Two 4 inch pieces of 4" X 4" post covered with carpeting

Two pieces of scrap copper house wiring (plastic coated copper wire)

Iron and assorted hot wax

Compact Swix edge and base device with file

Metal scraper and plastic scraper

Brush

A few feet of duct tape wrapped around a pencil stub

 

I support the skis base up, one at a time, on the 4x4's on the plastic sheet, keeping the brakes retracted with the bendable copper wire, and using duct tape where I need it to keep things from sliding.  If there is a long kitchen counter, that works best. I can then sharpen the edges, clean the base, hot wax, scrape and brush, and then empty the plastic and fold for the next use.  It all packs down to a reasonably small package that can fit with my skis in a ski bag or ski tube.

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

About the only thing I have a quibble with is your waxing.     HHS, crayoned, is simply s l o w for CO winters, and it gets slower the colder it gets, and it gets slower the fresher the snow.       Get a small bit of blue wax and a polishing cork and you can avoid the arm and wrist aches from poling on the runouts/cat tracks. 


But I just recently bought a boatload (ok, 25 1 oz bars) of HHS cheap off eBay. ;-)

 

Definitely getting colder; will look around and try to find a good deal on some blue wax. Thx.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

You can also get a $5 thrift store iron and a $3 scraper and take a shot at hot waxing while you have the newspaper out..


Have both of those at home, but living in a rented, somewhat frou-frou place, and am trying to keep things to what might be a reasonable minimum inside da house.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fummer View Post

My hotel room waxing set up includes:


Nice.  ;-)

post #6 of 7


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fummer View Post

My hotel room waxing set up includes:

 

Piece of plastic 7' long by 3' wide (Lowes, Home Depot have roles of 3' wide plastic)

Two 4 inch pieces of 4" X 4" post covered with carpeting

Two pieces of scrap copper house wiring (plastic coated copper wire)

Iron and assorted hot wax

Compact Swix edge and base device with file

Metal scraper and plastic scraper

Brush

A few feet of duct tape wrapped around a pencil stub


Sounds like a lot of excess and un needed trouble. 

I haven't hot waxed in a hotel lately, but I've done it at least 20 times in the past.  When I do I just drip and iron the wax in the bathroom (over the tub/and/or counter top) carefully then scrape up any accidental errant drips. Scrape the skis down outside in the parking lot.   I've never left a mess noticeable enough for the staff to complain.  Lately,  I just travel by car and take up to 4 pairs of skis

post #7 of 7

 

You're set for Tahoe then icon14.gif

 

(Yes, I also have 13lbs of HHS in a drawer somewhere, not to mention the random bits of WG and FC739)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post


But I just recently bought a boatload (ok, 25 1 oz bars) of HHS cheap off eBay. ;-)

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