New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tips for skiing moguls. - Page 6

post #151 of 161

Nice sequence and the smile tells the story doesn't it?

 

Thanks cvj for answering my question and confirming my thoughts about knee angulation.

 

Nice conditions at Stowe and these bumps look icing on the cake. One could probably ski three different lines in these. But why? I think Bud is taking the funnest line which is over the top and full of face shots.

 

Like I said, the smile says it all. There is nothing in skiing more gratifying than thumpping moguls and taking no hostages.

 

Nice Bud. BTW, I skied with you and Steve once at Copper and seemed to be the only one skiing moguls that day. I think you missed your calling.

 

Nail, I was a little harsh on you this morning. Hadn't had my coffee yet, sorry.

post #152 of 161

TDK6, I am glad to be on the same page again.  Your teardrop diagram is excellent and I think representative of natural terrain.  I wasn't going to say anything about the circle drawing, I understood the basic concept, but it just wasn't right and had to try to correct the inaccuracies.  I knew I'd open a can of worms, especially after Abox's comment, but I think it was worth the effort.

 

I'm going to add another line on you teardrop diagram showing how the technical line can mirror the zipperline, just shifted over 3-4'.

 

Bud is definitely skiing the BLUE line, he's stuffing his tips very high up on the mogul sidewall, probably hitting the mogul face even.  The snow is forgiving, to deflect that high up the sidewall in firmer bumps can result in quite a beating, as it's so easy to be a little late and get tossed to the bottom of the next rut, which can be a long way down.  Even in soft snow it's very aggressive and risky, which results in such big smiles.  I do like Bud's skiing, it's very powerful as he regularly stuffs the tips, his turns are definitely NOT a pivot/slip/skid in this sequence.

 

 

Quote:
Lars wrote:
 
Nice conditions at Stowe and these bumps look icing on the cake. One could probably ski three different lines in these. But why? I think Bud is taking the funnest line which is over the top and full of face shots.

 

I'm not trying to be argumentative Lars, but the funnest line to ski in soft bumps is down the technical line, going from mogul face to mogul face, skipping the backside turn.  It's faster and more efficient and very smooth, this is how I skied in the 2nd half of my Bday video. 

 

Here's what I'm talking about.  Take a look at frame 6 of Bud's sequence.  The abbreviated left turn doesn't have to be rushed, you can see how the skis never had time to cross under at the fall line.  The turn radius naturally wants to be elongated, as Bud is skiing very fast now.  If he would have just been patient, he'd be stuffing the tips into the mogul face at the finish of the left turn, across the rut instead of deflecting off the side with the next right turn.  In the next frames he turns right into the upcoming mogul face and deflects off of it again.  It's way smoother and faster to ski soft bumps, mogul face to mogul face by skipping the backside turn.  It's quite a ride, it's 1/2 the turns, I highly suggest trying it in soft conditions for those that haven't tried it or don't do it all the time.

 

 

Quote:
Lars wrote:
 
Nail, I was a little harsh on you this morning. Hadn't had my coffee yet, sorry.

 

NP Lars, I knew I'd take heat for the comment.  It's just that I thought the circle diagram was messed up and I had to say something.  It's not totally wrong, it's just not totally correct.  I certainly wasn't trying to barb TDK6, I think he understood what I was trying to say.  I do think the pentagon shape represents a mogul better than a circle.  I like TDK6's inverted ice cream cone, I'd like to see the bottom point cut off though and made broader.  The bottom of the backside is actually quite large and flat, that's why I like to turn in that location so much and don't want to see it eliminated in a diagram, it's really some of the best snow in natural terrain.  It's almost groomed, only better.

 

 

Quote:
skiingaround wrote about the 10 yr old skiing Lower Holiday, SV.
 
Agressive skiing. Started well, although it looked like I saw some double pole plants. Turn shape towards the end rather loses it.Some of the turns even looked like they started with a bit of a wedge.  Body appears to be thrown around a bit. Not too smooth. Overall sk bump rating 4/10

 

OUch!  Tough crowd here.  We worked on the hands all weekend and I thought the work showed great results, maybe we would have been better off just dragging the poles behind which may have gained a 3/10.  LOL

 

Seriously, if I saw you or anyone carry that kind of speed over the nose of Lower Holiday without twisting the skis sideways in a desperate skid, which would probably result in a high speed cut out, I'd give you a 7/10 simply based on your commitment to the fall line.  On any given day, there aren't 2 out of 100 skiers that can ski that line that well, looking forward to seeing your video.

post #153 of 161

Oops, I was actually commenting on the guy in the yellow jacket skiing, the adult, not the kids, sorry. I didn't take note of the name of the person posting the video. 

post #154 of 161

skiingaround, the skier in the yellow jacket is the 10 yr. old.  I think he skied it really well for any age though.

post #155 of 161

no, it's by nailbenderx, and it's definitely and adult. There are no kids in this video. He's skiing some bumps in poor light and it may even be snowing.

post #156 of 161

The only person I see in yellow is nails son and he is 10 years old and skiing with great basics for his age. He will only get better with time. He has come a long way in 2 years as he was in my kids video doing the wedge demo's.

 

He is not worried about some mythical look but more interested in what the skis are doing.

post #157 of 161

It says this at the top of a series of pics skiing bumps, i'm assuming this is the same guy in the video.

 

Bud HEishman from ESA Stowe...

 

Anyway, if I haven't completely got the pics/videos mixed up, then that 10yr old skiing the bumps changes things hugely. That kid is ripping and by the time he's in his mid teens, watch out ski world. I wish I had more kids like that in my classes.

post #158 of 161

OK, got it skiingaround.  The post I made had Bud (yellow jacket) in the pic at the top of the post.  The 10 yr. old is in a yellow jacket also, but he is in the video at the end of the post, Bud is not in the video.  2 different skiers in the same post.  I do think both are ripping it up though.

 

The kid is a great example how SVMM can rapidly progress a skier's ability level/technique.  Constantly building on the same turn mechanics in natural terrain and on the groomed when making QCT's.  I agree, when he's a teen, lookout.  I think his improvements will easily be seen in progressive videos this winter.


Edited by Nailbender - 12/18/10 at 4:39pm
post #159 of 161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailbender View Post

OK, got it skiingaround.  The post I made had Bud (yellow jacket) in the pic at the top of the post.  The 10 yr. old is in a yellow jacket also, but he is in the video at the end of the post, Bud is not in the video.  2 different skiers in the same post.  I do think both are ripping it up though.

 

The kid is a great example how SVMM can rapidly progress a skier's ability level/technique.  Constantly building on the same turn mechanics in natural terrain and on the groomed when making QCT's.  I agree, when he's a teen, lookout.  I think his improvements will easily be seen in progressive videos this winter.



I can't argue that Nail. Practice on the groomed till your mechanics are sound, then take it into the moguls.

 

You know why I think kids progress so quickly in moguls? Actually it's a combination of things.

 

One, they haven't had a chance to develope any bad habits in their technique. The major flaw that adults seeking to become good mogul skiers is the fact they've been trying to build upon several years of bad technique while trying to improve in the moguls. Mogul skiing will bring out all your flaws.

 

Two, kids have such a low center of gravity making it easier to maintain proper balance.

seems to me every good mogul skier I've been around is small in stature. I'm only 5'9" and most of the guys who i've skied with over the years that are really good are anywhere from 5'7" to 5'9".

 

This doesn't mean tall people can't ski moguls but I do think they struggle more. It's like they never look as smooth as short skiers. (can of worms here)?

post #160 of 161

Yep Lars, I agree.  get kids started with the correct basics and they tend to level up quickly, not only in skiing, but academics/socially.

 

I have to agree that shorter skiers probably have an advantage overall, lower COM and they seem to be built like bulldogs.  This can also be a disadvantage to technically leveling up as they are possibly able to make up for technical deficiencies more easily by applying and over coming with shear strength.  I think the same applies for kids too. 

 

Both tall and short skiers need a committed desire to hang on the bump runs though, it's way to easy to get frustrated and just avoid them. 

 

I'm off to switch off w/mom and the kid, we got 10" here now and it's still snowing...WOOT!  This place is going off NOW!

post #161 of 161

No matter if you are 10 or 60 trying to ski. The theory of what that skier has practiced is major. If the skier has concentrated on to many different things like slide and pivot instead of getting the ski to do the work by getting the ski into reverse camber and get rebound. If all skiers could understand some simple theories like this.

 

 

Today the best skiers get there skis engaged and carving earlier and earlier in the turn. Carving more in the fall line because at the point where the ski is in the fall line, the skier is at the steepest point of the run using gravity to the utmost. This is where the skier can produce more speed.

 

3 things why this works.

 

1 2 3 High edge angles, early pressure on the outside ski, and putting the pressure on the fore body of the ski.

 

How to do this;

It all starts at the completion of the previous turn, the skiers upper body takes a direct line down the fall line in comparison to where the path of the skis take as the skis finish the arc. This gives the skier am lot of incline and edge angle in the initiation of the next turn without pushing  the skis to the side. The skier puts his downhill  knee inward to apply pressure to the fore body of the ski to help with increased edge angle, by flexing the skiers ankle and pressing his shin into the front of the boot. At this point the skier moves the pressure on the skis from the tip to the tail to release the skis from the carve, arc or turn. The skier does this by straightening out of the ankles so there is no longer pushes on the fronts of the boots, keeping the skiers arms and torso forward in a good balanced, athletic body position from where the skier can move forward in to the next turn.

 

Another way to think about this is as if you are rocking in a rocking chair. Start the turn on the front of the ski and rock to the tail to finish.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching