EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › EpicSki Community › International Zone › st.anton, austria
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

st.anton, austria

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

i just signed up for at trip goin to st.anton in the end of march. anyone been there and have any advice or reviews on the mountain and what to expect? i'm a pretty strong skier, and prefer to ski side country and back country rather than the trails. whens the best times to be there? i heard most of the mountain is south facing and the snow doesnt hold up very well, is this true? any advice or info u guys have is greatly appreciated.

post #2 of 19

St. Anton is my only European experience and it was wonderful!.  It was Feb 2001.  We stayed right in the village at a great hotel featuring a yummy breakfast buffet and a delicious dinner every day included.  You could walk to a lift and the night life in St Anton is second to none.  It is a very popular European destionation and is very multi national, but in a good way as everyone was friendly.

 

Sounds like you are a good skier and would like the off piste tour that I took.  The ski school offers an off piste tour that takes you from town to town.  I did it for 4 out of the 5 days and it was a great experience.  On par with the snowcat skiing I did at Steamboat, but only a bit rougher, but in a good way.  You would start with a warm up run or two on the front and then we would take the highest chair up and drop off the back while our instructer/guide held the rope up for us to scoot under.  Pretty cool. We would end up in a different town each day for lunch and then go up the town lift and go back off the back side of the Mountain and head home.  When you do multiple days you stay with the same instructor and many of the same folks.  Great time.

 

Good Luck

 

Rick G

post #3 of 19

I'm heading out the St. Anton the last day of January.  from what I am reading it might be the best place in Europe for an experienced skier.  The place is huge, like many other European resort areas, but it is known for it difficult runs.

Here is a map.  It takes two to get it all.

http://www.skisnowboardeurope.com/arlberg/layout.html

Here is where you get a guide.

http://www.pistetopowder.com/

On there site they say most of the mtn is covered already, that's a good start.

I doubt you need a guide, but I am sure that it would likely to be worth it to get out of bounds and the local experience, at least for a day.

Check out what they say on TripAdvisor about St. Anton. 

The end of March could be warm, and i read that some of mtn does face south.  But I wouldn't let that worry me, likely everything will be open, and it could be stormy with powder.  The mtns will be spectacular and so will the culture. 

Here's another map.

http://www.freeride.co.uk/img/resort/skimap/large/164.jpg

I'll probably be posting a report on my trip after I come back so look for it in early Feb.

 

 

post #4 of 19

If you go out of bounds like we did on our tour you do want to have a guide.  On more than one occasion I asked our guide why we did not finish skiing down this grade or that nice chute over there, and was told that it resulted in a walk out.  If you need a rescue you will be charged for it which happend to a couple of Brittish snowboarders who were staying at our hotel and we got to know.  The cost was thousands of dollars!

 

Rick G

post #5 of 19

Oh absolutely be very, very careful out there!  I have only trip to Europe under my belt, Zermatt, and you want to stay on the marked trails, always being very aware of where you are going to end up.  I am not sure how it exactly compared to Zermatt, but there there were well-marked runs and if you ventured off those runs anything could happen.  Don't follow tracks into the unknown like is typical while skiing in the US.  At Zermatt, there were not any ropes, only the pistes which were marked with orange poles, every 100 feet.

 

But there will be plenty of mtn to ski if you are on a budget and don't really feel the need to venture off-piste with a guide. (although if you are an advanced skier it would likely be worth your while, I'm going to do it for a day) You won't need a guide to skis the couple ten thousand acres of inbound terrain.  Also, there is another huge resort, Lech-Zurs, right next door to St. Anton, and if you are there for a week, it might be a good option to venture up there for a day.  Supposedly that is where the real rich and famous hang out.

post #6 of 19


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post

Oh absolutely be very, very careful out there!  I have only trip to Europe under my belt, Zermatt, and you want to stay on the marked trails, always being very aware of where you are going to end up.



Along these lines..... If you spend the afternoon in the Kangaruh or the Moose and you ski down after.... Remember to stop before you hit the asphalt at the bottom of the trail, and don't follow any Scandinavians because "they look like they know where they are going"

post #7 of 19
Don't miss the mooserwirt and crazy kanguru at the end of the day for some of the best après ski anywhere. As someone above said watch out for the end of the trail when you ski to the bottom afterwards - may seem obvious, but not with liberating amounts of alcohol!

Make sure to eat in some of the slope side places, you'll be pleasantly surprised. Some look sleepy on the outside but inside they're literally rocking. One even had a spiral slide (trough) down to the mens room.

Definitely get a guide and have him take you under the rope off the very top for the back door route to Lech! I didn't and based on what I've heard from others I regret it! There is plenty of off piste to be had, and most is right there in front of you but there's usually someone you can tag along with that knows the terrain. And you know as well as I do that you're not going there to stay on the trails.

One of my favorite places to ski - huge, great people, great food, awesome terrain, and a great place to party. Make sure you have comfortable ski boots as you may be in them until midnight on a few occasions. Don't scrimp on accommodations - stay in the town where the atmosphere is.

Man I'm jealous - I want to go back - now I'm going to spend the rest of the week trying to get my posse to leave Tahoe for a trip there this season.
post #8 of 19

^^ It's quite a common occurrence to see a couple of Scandi's walking down the street with there ski's still on after an afternoon in the Kangaruh!

 

 

Definitely take the trip to Lech.... Some nice fun skiing out there.

 

 

Be careful at St.Anton at the end of the day..... If you're tired, a download could be worthwhile.... The two main routes back into town are the green run past the Kangaruh which gets crazy busy and sloppy, or the Downhill run which gets pretty steep and icy.... You maybe fine, but the guy who falls at the top and the takes everyone out like a bowling ball is the danger! (this is especially bad after the WC event as the course is freshly injected and nice and hard!!)

post #9 of 19

I really enjoyed Lech / St. Anton when I did them a few years ago. only caution I have to to be sure you're on the right side of the lifts depending on where you want to be at the end of the day, as the road that connects them (I stayed in Lech) is closed in winter, and the taxi fare to get back around the valley 6-7 years ago was about $100.

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post

I really enjoyed Lech / St. Anton when I did them a few years ago. only caution I have to to be sure you're on the right side of the lifts depending on where you want to be at the end of the day, as the road that connects them (I stayed in Lech) is closed in winter, and the taxi fare to get back around the valley 6-7 years ago was about $100.


The road (Flexenpass) is only closed during big storms unless you mean that you ended up in Warth, that would be a problem.

post #11 of 19

You'd probably get more replies if you posted this thread in the Eurozone. I'll give a quick run-down from what I've seen:

 

If you really want a cool experience, get a flight to Zurich and take the train from there (there's a station under the airport). It's an easy journey, the route is very scenic, and the train station in St. Anton is right in the middle of town. The price is also quite reasonable. I highly recommend it.

 

The best conditions are probably in February, but that's also just about the busiest time of year due to European school holidays. The snow base is deeper in March, but temperatures can get high enough to cause freeze-thaw cycles.

 

Skiing in St. Anton itself will be quite crowded, with most off-piste stuff tracked out and on-piste conditions getting icy in spots. The best off-piste skiing is in Lech, Zurs, Stuben, and Oberlech, which you can get to reasonably quickly in the morning if you go ludicrous speed on the pistes (which will be nicely groomed in the mornings, making it easy to cruise fast). For various reasons, these areas have fewer powder hounds. So, stay in St. Anton but ski in the other areas.

 

Keep in mind that skiing in the trees is technically illegal in the Arlberg area and can carry a heavy fine, so take a good look over your shoulder before diving in. Or, stay out altogether if your wallet can't take the hit.

 

Finally, my number one tip for any resort in Europe: if you go off piste without a guide, do not take a line unless you've scoped it out entirely and know where the exit route is. Europeans have no qualms about building resorts with huge cliffs and gullies right in the middle of a bunch of marked pistes, so you can easily get yourself in trouble in areas where you wouldn't expect it.

 


Edited by CerebralVortex - 11/11/10 at 2:48am
post #12 of 19

+1 for the train......  I used to fly to Munich, sample some of the local hospitality before taking the train to St. Anton.... A great way to head into the mountains!

 

German/Austrian trains are good, Very good.

post #13 of 19

I lived near Munich for 6 years and skied St. Anton & Lech more times then I care to remember.  First, skiing in Europe is NOTHING like skiing in the US.  Trails are not as well marked and if you're an expert, you can ski just about any place on the mountain you want.  My advice to a good skier that is a novice to Europe, hire a guide/instructor for a day, for all the money you are spending to get their, this more then worth the investment.  They will take you places on the mountain you would never find on your own, even after a week.  Also, they are very cheep compared to the US.  Just go to the ski school and tell them what kind of skier you are and what you want from a guide for a day.  They will be happy to accommodate!

 

The European skiing experience is not about how much vertical you get in a day, it's about the experience of being on the mountain, great lunches with a beer in a restaurant on the mountain that makes you wonder how they get the food to them and the best Apre Skiing you'll ever experience.  (Check out Mooservert about 200 meters from the base of the mountain, it is a party well into the night)

 

Have fun, I wish I could get back their this year!!!!!!!

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob4snow View Post

 

The European skiing experience is not about how much vertical you get in a day, it's about the experience of being on the mountain, great lunches with a beer in a restaurant on the mountain that makes you wonder how they get the food to them and the best Apre Skiing you'll ever experience.


 

Spatzele smothered in cheese, weissbier, strudel etc. Fine, fine stuff.

 

Exactly right - skiing in Yurp is a wonderful social time, versus mega vert in North America. I like both, but probably need an Alps fix soon as I think fondly of it. My company is based in Augsburg, and I went on a bus trip from there to St Anton once - nobody spoke English on the bus, but we had a really fine time with a lot of laughs, and I wasn't permitted to pay for one beer.

post #15 of 19

snofun3, your company is in Augsburg?  That's the town I lived in.  Worked for MAN Roland there from 95 to 01.  Small world!!!

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob4snow View Post

snofun3, your company is in Augsburg?  That's the town I lived in.  Worked for MAN Roland there from 95 to 01.  Small world!!!



Your old HQ is now our "Diesel house". I'm MAN Diesel for 17 years.

post #17 of 19

St Anton/Lech gets some of the most snow in the Alps, so they usually have a good base as well later on in the season. Know where you are going if skiing off-piste there as a perfect looking powder field can abruptly end in a cliff. A guide or tour can have you ski from St Anton -> Lech and have your bags meet you along the way. Although there is also enough skiing in St Anton to last you a week.

post #18 of 19

 

Now as one of the local ski instructors and -guides in St. Anton, I just want to mention a very important thing.

 

As many of you guys are mentioning going backcountry skiing here, which of course is what the Arlberg are famous for, but one very important issue here is the safety aspect, unlike the states where you have a roped-off area where as long as you stay inside the rope, you're pretty safe from avalanches. Well that is not the case in St. Anton, where we don't have any ropes, and as soon as you venture away from the groomed piste, then it is your own responsibility.

 

One thing is to ski between two pistes and enjoy a bit of powder or bumps, but another thing is to ski down into another valley, where you have no idea what the snow conditions are like, I'm not talking about powder or crust, but what's the likelihood of triggering an avalanche. Because they do happen out there - then it is very important to carry the right safety equipment and know how to use it. So everybody skiing out of bounce, should be carrying an avalanche transceiver, a backpack with a shovel and a probe and preferable also some kind of first-aid kit.

 

This is not to scare people of, because I wish that so many people as possible can get out there in the backcountry to experience and enjoy the beauty of it - you can find some inspiration here http://www.torbensphotos.com/Offpiste/ .

post #19 of 19

Yes arlbergextreme, I agree the backcountry is not to be taken lightly. Once there, you are at the mercy of your own judgement and actions, along with Mother Nature. Even if you follow all the right protocols, things can still go awry. Use proper judgement, have the right backcountry equipment, know how to use it, follow the weather & avalanche forecasts and always skis with a buddy.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: International Zone
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › EpicSki Community › International Zone › st.anton, austria