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New ski for a possible new ski instructor???

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

I recently have decided to pursue a ski instructing job in the midwest, and was wondering if I should be looking into a new ski to teach on and maybe have a little fun on as well.  I am 6'1 190lbs and ski a pair of Rossi CX80's in a 170 (I know, I know....it's short) with Nordica Speedmachine 10's on hard.  A while ago, I posted a thread about possibly adding to my quiver, and mentioned how I would be looking for something that I could take into the bumps and tight glades, given that my CX80's don't do that all too well.  Also, I wouldn't mind giving freestyle a try, but it is not a priority.  Although I want a ski that can do the bumps and trees, the ski NEEDS to be able to grip on hardpack and ice, because that's basically all i ski.  All ideas and input are greatly appreciated, if anyon has any questions feel free to ask.

Thanks,

Tyler Dixon

post #2 of 10

I have a pair of Rossi 80ti's, basically the same as the CX80's I believe.  I find these skis to be a pretty versatile teaching ski & fun to rip on as well.  Although they are not my first choice in soft or deep snow, they do fine in the bumps & tight areas for me.  My only complaint on those skis is the low profile tip, I am afraid of burying them in a soft spot or hole when skiing off piste on not so firm snow.  If I were to replace them right now, I would probably go with this years the 82ti.  Fortunately for me I have a bunch of skis, but these skis would most likely be part of a 2 or 3 ski quiver for me.

 

It sounds to me like a pair of wider twin tips or something slightly rockered is what you may be looking for?  To me only a ski with race construction can really grip on hard, icy snow, so hopefully some others can help narrow your choices down.

 

JF

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

I completely agree with you on most of your points, and even on them working in tight trees to a point.  But as far as the bumps go, these skis just don't do it for me.  As far as what I'm looking for, I also think you are correct, but half the problem is that that's what I THINK I want, not what I know I want.  It would just seem like the most logical addition right here and now. 

post #4 of 10

For teaching, you need something versatile.  The CX80s actually wouldn't be a terrible choice for that.

 

As a new instructor you'll also be teaching a lot of beginners, on very tame slopes, and you may also need to do a fair amount of walking uphill.  Mogul and tree performance is pretty much irrelevant. 

 

I've been on the Dynastar Contacts for two seasons (the model that's now the Contact Cross).  Frontside oriented, grips ice like crazy.  Versatile for lessons; easy to demo all sorts of techniques.  Okay in bumps and trees if you stay right on top of them.  Not real good in powder.  The 4x4 is a little more of an all-mountain model, might be what you're looking for if you want to venture off the beaten path.

 

This year I got the Fischer Progressor 9+.  Also insane ice grip, and the only thing I've demoed in two years that I felt was more stable and an overall better frontside ski.  There were others that were great at very high speeds, but the Progressors are super-versatile and responsive even in low-speed maneuvers.

 

The new Head Supershape Titan is an interesting-looking ski, too.  I've seen several very, very good instructors on the SS Magnums.  Again not great in deep snow, but for dealing with ice and any sort of Eastern frontside conditions (including bumps), they can get it done.

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Sorry, I wasn't clear as to why I listed the bump and tree performance.  I would also like to ski this ski when I'm not instructing, thus the bump performance comes into play.

post #6 of 10

For teaching beginners, twin tips are a must.  Watching a student from behind is only good if she's cute and wears form fitting ski pants.  You really need to be able to watch them from as many angles as possible and twin tips are so much better for that.  At least that's my opinion.

post #7 of 10

If I were ever to go back to teaching skiing...................

 

I would choose a versatile all mountain ski in the mid 80's width range as a work ski. A ski such as a Dynastar Sultan 85, Fischer Motive 84 or Rossi SC 86 would be among my first choices. All have enough grip for anything short of transparent, enough lift and forgiveness for mixed conditions, and have enough tail kick for skiing backwards at moderate speeds. If you wanted an AM twin, IMO, the versatility list is topped by the Line Prophet 90.

 

Some of the other skis mentioned are more hard snow biased and more stable but less versatile than these four.

 

SJ

post #8 of 10

 

Quote:
Some of the other skis mentioned are more hard snow biased and more stable but less versatile than these four.

 

That's a fair assessment.  At a bigger resort, or in a region that gets more snow, something in the mid-80s would work very well also.

 

The problem with being an instructor in the East is that sometimes you have to teach on "transparent" days.  "Too much snow" is a problem I'd like to have more often.  :-/

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

Very true Matthias.  I think I will probably end up just teaching on my Rossi's (or at least on the hardpack/ icy days), but still could be looking at a new ski in the future.  I would probably end up going with a mid 80s to 90 twin tip, but also might consider a slalom race ski to at least have some variation in my turn radii (I know, opposite ends of the spectrum, but something that also interests me).  Realistically, depending on the conditions, I could teach on both (my Rossis and the second ski), though the slalom might be a bit demanding.  Any thoughts????????

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

 

Quote:
Some of the other skis mentioned are more hard snow biased and more stable but less versatile than these four.

 

That's a fair assessment.  At a bigger resort, or in a region that gets more snow, something in the mid-80s would work very well also.

 

The problem with being an instructor in the East is that sometimes you have to teach on "transparent" days.  "Too much snow" is a problem I'd like to have more often.  :-/


Blizzard 8.7 have enough grip for ICE. they do handle nearly everything really well as long as.....

 

A. your a strong skier and or weight much more than I do at 165lb

B. you havent been spoiled by rockered skis in powder.

 

 They are the skinniest ski I teach on and have enough twin to ski backwards. The 174 skis much longer than it should, its rockstar stable maching groomers.

 

 

although IMO the Original Poster needs to grow a pair and just ski the CX80. Is it the best bump ski or tree ski? heck no some 80-100 mm twin tip is, but its not retardly stiff like a 4x4.

 

basically if he wants one of the best bumps/trees he can get he should be looking at p90 and just keep CX80s for icey days and/or learn how to ski them everywhere because any skis that is going to ski trees/bumps/powder/crud/slush better than the cx80 while still matching its ice performance is going to be even tougher to ski.

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