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What must I do to prepare & maintain new skis?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I finally got new skis after many years of skiing very rarely and on rentals. Until 1990 I skied often in Colorado and California on skinny skis that I never maintained. Now I have Volkl AC30 that I bought last spring and have never been skied on. The shop mounted the bindings and detuned the tip edges slightly. The only thing I did was back off the DIN settings for storage.

 

Other than retighten the bindings, what do I really need to do before hitting the slopes?  Is it necessary to wax them or can I skip it? What is an appropriate waxing regimen for a maintenance newbie? I obviously won't get them retuned now, though I might do so after they've seen some use.

 

FWIW, I'll be using these skis on the East coast, and I have boots that I bought during the season and have skied with (on rented AC50s). I consider myself a Level 7 on the scale described at http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/66885/explanation-of-the-9-level-ski-ability-scale. Large moguls and deep powder are still a problem for me.

 

-Jeff

 

P.S. I'm also wondering whether I should pick up a cheap used pair of rock skis for early-season use -- I hate the thought of gouging up my new boards in early-season conditions!

post #2 of 18

I tried to ride my BarHoppers last season without waxing them first.  Only because I hadn't intended to ride them that day, but I was too anxious and gave in.  They were like skiing on playdoh. After one run had to take them in to the shop on the mountain for a good once over.

post #3 of 18

 

 

Quote:
I obviously won't get them retuned now

 

I think you should get them tuned.  Some new skis have an excellent state of tune.  Some are poorly tuned.  Some skis cup due to the materials curing.  At least have them checked for being actually flat on the bottoms.  I'd also get the edges sharpened to the angles that best suit your skiing style and snow conditions.  I'd suggest 1° base edge bevel and 2° side edge bevel if you are a conservative skidding skier, and maybe 0.75° base and 3° side if you are a carver.  Detune the tips & tails?  What exactly did they do?  The tips and tails should be sharp all the way to the contact point with the snow.  The parts of the tips that rise above the contact point should be detuned, but not any part in contact with the snow.  Detuning the part of the tips and tails that contact the snow was how we did things on the old straight skis with no bottom edge bevel.  Ancient history.

 

Yes, wax.  It doesn't have to be anything fancy.  I just melt in some universal wax, re-melt and wipe the excess off with a paper towel, and ski.  Works for me.  The wax that works for us is melted into the pores of the base.  The wax on the surface is immediately skied off, or wiped off, or scraped off, or brushed off.

 

Moguls...a couple of things are poison in bumps.  Skiing with your weight on your heels kills you.  Rotating your upper body in the direction of the hill ruins turns.  Leaning back toward the hill can not work.  So...as you crest over each bump, strongly pull both feet back way behind you--it'll turn out to be just right.  You'll start out on your tips and end up centered.  Keep your zipper pointed down the hill.  Reach down the hill with your pole 2" off the snow so your head and shoulders are downhill from your hips.

 

Powder...You gott'a have your weight equally balanced on both feet.  You gott'a have your weight centered fore & aft and maybe just very slightly on your heels--did I say very,very slightly?  You gott'a turn smoothly and at the tempo that your skis down inside the snow want to turn.  You turn by putting both skis on edge inside the snow.  Visualize an airplane banking through a turn.  Think of both skis together banking through a turn in the snow.  Your body needs to be facing downhill, and you need to be balanced with your head and shoulders downhill and your hips angled for balance.  You don't need speed...that's the usual crutch people suggest.  You need balance.


Edited by SoftSnowGuy - 11/6/10 at 8:02pm
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks, gents. I guess I really should do some initial waxing. I don't want to have the skis tuned until I've tried them with the factory tune.

post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff2010 View Post

Thanks, gents. I guess I really should do some initial waxing. I don't want to have the skis tuned until I've tried them with the factory tune.


If you want to try the factory tune, then you need to resharpen those tips and tails.

post #6 of 18

Good question

 

I'm a bit out of the loop when it comes to brand new skis.  But, in the past they shipped them base high to prevent the edges from damaging the top sheets under them in the stacks they were shipped in.  It was common practice to pre-tune them by filing the flat.  However, now with today's concave bases and factory edge bevels they might just need wax.  Does anybody/everybody still ship skis base high?

 

post #7 of 18

It probably differs by company.  I remember in the old days Kästle shipped my SGs with pre-prepared bases and sharp edges enough to cut your hands when you tested their torsional rigidity.  All I had to do was peel off the protective covering from the bases and go skiing.  My Fischers were hot-waxed by the shop that sold them to me and were also sharp upon inspection.  My Volants, rescued from the remaindered bin at a sports store I waxed and sharpened. My left-over 2002 Völks bought off the internet, I waxed and sharpened out of habit.  

 

The store you bought them from may have hot waxed them for you as a courtesy service.  If they have wax on them (try scraping some off with your finger nail), and the edges are sharp (see if they will scrape off some of your fingernail), then just ski.  If not buy a 2 degree edge guide (standard side edge for Völkl), and touch up the edges with a file or diamond stone.  You will want to hot wax and resharpen the side edges every several days of skiing any way, so the purchase of a good solid 2 degree edge guide and file and a couple of stones is money well spent.

post #8 of 18

I have seen no new skis base high.(except a couple of pair of Atomic Slaloms whcih were replaced on warranty sincv the base high problem underfoot was casued by improper pressing at the time of manufacture.  If any problem exists it is concavity in the tip and tail areas with overall too much base bevel and not enough side edge bevel.

 

If your skis are flat 10-15mm in from each edge they will ski fine. No reason to try to complelety flatten the base unless you want grind through it or drastially shorten the life of your skis.

post #9 of 18

You might want to buy some turtle wax and wax the topsheet. It really helps keep the topsheets in good shape. Its a must.

post #10 of 18

Heres a few basic tips for ski care KISS stuff.   Waxing etc., check history here on epic and clic up Slidewright one of Epics people who  has great info. on wax etc. etc.

 

Top sheets, binding, anti-frictiion pad:  spray with WD40 and wipe off excess, the oil/silicone base to Wd 40 will build up over time and gum up stuff so wipe off just leaving a thin film.  For the crevases etc. of the bindings I use a shaving brush and apply lube with that, then wipe off excess.

 

After skiing take your skis inside and store standing up to dry.   If you put them in a cold garage or leave in your car or whatever they will rust - the steel edges.

 

Store skis standing up and with zero pressure on the bases. Saving the camber or the rocker.

 

I have saved washclothes every hotel/ motel I have stayed in for years and use them for wiping, cleaning etc.

 

Do not store skis in your garage over the summer.

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

I have seen no new skis base high.(except a couple of pair of Atomic Slaloms whcih were replaced on warranty sincv the base high problem underfoot was casued by improper pressing at the time of manufacture.  If any problem exists it is concavity in the tip and tail areas with overall too much base bevel and not enough side edge bevel.

 

If your skis are flat 10-15mm in from each edge they will ski fine. No reason to try to complelety flatten the base unless you want grind through it or drastially shorten the life of your skis.

i didn't think they still would.  No most topsheets come with a peelcoat to protet them.  And, making them base high seems like a wate of materials that would add up in large economies of scale.
 

post #12 of 18


Quote:
Originally Posted by shoal007 View Post

You might want to buy some turtle wax and wax the topsheet. It really helps keep the topsheets in good shape. Its a must.



I wouldn't do that.  Paste wax can actually remove a thin layer of the finish and can soften some types of paint and plastics. 

post #13 of 18

Well use windshield wiper fluid. You MUST protect those TOPSHEETS!!!!!!!!!!

 

<sarcasm>

post #14 of 18


Windshield wiper fluid?  Why would you put alcohol and window cleaner onto your new skis?

 

<not sarcasm>  No need to get cute with new members who are honestly asking for advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shoal007 View Post

Well use windshield wiper fluid. You MUST protect those TOPSHEETS!!!!!!!!!!

 

<sarcasm>

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeC View Post


Windshield wiper fluid?  Why would you put alcohol and window cleaner onto your new skis?

 

<not sarcasm>  No need to get cute with new members who are honestly asking for advice.



+1, The Supporter Lounge is the proper forum/platform to ridicule the noobs.

post #16 of 18

Leave the topsheets alone.   The only advantage in having a pristine topsheet is if you don't like the skis they might get stolen sooner, allowing you to replace them.  It's the bases that matter.

post #17 of 18

Well, if you hate then you could always decide not to leave them alone!

CenCoBounce08009.jpg

Who wants a new paintjob?

 

post #18 of 18

If it is about 37 degrees or below they won't rust..

 

Dry 'em off complelety no matter where you store them.

 

I would not use WD40 on skis. The stuff smells awful for one thing. And you certainlky don't want your bases contaminated with oil.

 

Homenkol makes a great binding lubricant. And it is easy to spray only on the track/. (bindings are internally permanatly lubricated.But most systems nowadays require smooth movement of the binding in the track

 

I see no reason whatsoever to do anything to the topsheets except pccasionally wipe them down with a damp cloth and dry 'em.

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