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How to determine good ski gloves? - Page 2

post #31 of 41

Well Hestra and Cloudveil certainly are reputed to make very high quality gloves, and I have been pleased with my Dakine Gore-tex gloves I've been using for the past couple seasons.

 

One can certainly get very good quality gloves for quite a lot less than $100, but you have to be patient, and shop around. I've bought my last three pairs of gloves over the internet, which doesn't allow one to try them on for fit and feel, but I've done very well, 55-70% off retail. I expect at Snowbomb you'll be lucky to find anything marked down more than 20%.

 

If you watch tramdock.com, good quality gloves often come up for sale at steep discounts, and if you sign up for the deal flier from sierratradingpost.com there will be great deals to be had. Good luck.

post #32 of 41



not sure of your size but I am selling brand new hestra army gore XCR gloves right now for 90 shipped.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by aguo5520 View Post

Could anyone recommend any of these brands with waterproof and breathable characteristics?

http://www.sfskifest.com/WinterSale.html

I'm going to snowbomb and am considering to get some gloves.

 

And also, is it possible to get a breathable gore-tex for under 100 dollars? Been lookin around at gore-tex and been noticing the high prices that I can't get my budget around.

 

 

Thanks.

post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

 

 

Obviously you haven't skied the Sierras or the Cascades, or in the Rockies below 7500 feet for that matter.


Ha. That sounds about right. Maybe I should have been more specific--although I've suffered wet butt from sitting on a chair above that elevation. 

post #34 of 41

 

Quote:
And also, is it possible to get a breathable gore-tex for under 100 dollars? Been lookin around at gore-tex and been noticing the high prices that I can't get my budget around.

 

I think I got my Spyder gore-tex gloves for ~$70 or so on sale, but that was in the springtime.  Right now is probably a bad time to be shopping for winter gear.

 

All but one or two days last year I used either the Spyder ones (similar to these: http://www.backcountry.com/spyder-sestriere-gore-tex-glove) or the Smartwool "spring" gloves (https://www.smartwool.com/default.cfm#/Search/spring%20glove/_/_/312/).  I had some older "Hotfingers" gloves that are REALLY, REALLY warm -- so much so that my hands sweat like crazy in them unless it's brutally cold.  There were a couple of days I used those.

post #35 of 41


 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

I think I got my Spyder gore-tex gloves for ~$70 or so on sale, but that was in the springtime.  Right now is probably a bad time to be shopping for winter gear.

That's just crazy talk.

 

Ask and ye shall receive, seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you.

 

 

 

 

post #36 of 41

He not only looks like a prophet, he talks like one as well.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

 

That's just crazy talk.

 

Ask and ye shall receive, seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you.

 

 

post #37 of 41


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I can't go with Tromano on this one. The very best glove you can afford, no question. reason: the glove has to perform on the worst day, not the best or typical. Most, even the best, seem to get wet sometimes, but not cold. I have two extra pairs in the car or locker for those really nasty days. goretex for sure. If you ski daily, it's a major expense, a new pair every year, but a minor cost for skiing every day.

 

Not really. I probably have 4-5 pairs of gloves and mittens. Each has its place. Some are water proof / breathable. Some are mittens, some are leather work gloves. The idea that each glove has to be able to stand up to the worst conditions doesn't make a lot of sense to me. If its dumping then yea I will use the goretex. But most days here you don't need goretex. There are days where a thin lined work glove is more comfortable than a heavier insulated and less breathable laminate glove e.g. today, high pressure, no precip, 28F, nice afternoon tour. I carry a spare pair of gloves in my pack so ifI need goretex I have them. But on those days where its warm and fair weather it makes sense to me using the cheaper gloves that way I  am not wearing out my fancy goretex gloves.

post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I can't go with Tromano on this one. The very best glove you can afford, no question. reason: the glove has to perform on the worst day, not the best or typical. Most, even the best, seem to get wet sometimes, but not cold. I have two extra pairs in the car or locker for those really nasty days. goretex for sure. If you ski daily, it's a major expense, a new pair every year, but a minor cost for skiing every day.

 

Not really. I probably have 4-5 pairs of gloves and mittens. Each has its place. Some are water proof / breathable. Some are mittens, some are leather work gloves. The idea that each glove has to be able to stand up to the worst conditions doesn't make a lot of sense to me. If its dumping then yea I will use the goretex. But most days here you don't need goretex. There are days where a thin lined work glove is more comfortable than a heavier insulated and less breathable laminate glove e.g. today, high pressure, no precip, 28F, nice afternoon tour. I carry a spare pair of gloves in my pack so ifI need goretex I have them. But on those days where its warm and fair weather it makes sense to me using the cheaper gloves that way I  am not wearing out my fancy goretex gloves.



glove quiver. interesting approach. I wear the same pair for 100 plus days and then they are usually done. I can see the quiver concept also.

but I like things constant, helps get in the zone and trigger muscle memory, a theory.

post #39 of 41

It just so happens that I'm in the position of looking for replacements for my trusty Marmot Alpinist gloves that I've owned and abused for years.  I skied Vail yesterday and at long last, these are starting to let the cold creep in.  They were incredible for many years though.  Perhaps overly expensive, otherwise I'd buy them again but at $180, I need to consider everything else for a player on equal ground but at a more reasonable price.  

 

I have some high end one-piece leather, long gauntlet gloves and that approach simply doesn't hold a candle to the waterproof glove/glove insert system. To the OP, I've read many good reviews regarding These similar Gore-Tex Marmots, retailing for $75 with a lifetime warranty.

 

My criteria:

 

1) Waterproof/breathable glove

2) Insulating, removable glove insert

3) Long gauntlet

4) Proven rather than new on the scene.  I want to be assured of a relatively long service life.

5) Lifetime warranty doesn't hurt (Marmot), but I'm considering others.

6) $150 or less would be super but would go higher if nothing is on equal ground to the Marmot Alpinist

 

post #40 of 41



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

Rule #1: if it says Hestra, it is very good :-)  

 

Rule #2: waterproof and breathable (which most likely means GoreTex) good leather at least in the high wear points and on the grip.  Another great feature is a removable liner- makes drying the glove in the evening much more straightforward- even the most waterproof gloves get damp inside from sweat, condensation, or some snow finding its way in.  Hestra Heli fits this mode to a T (although it is not GoreTex), if you are willing to be extravagant, the new Arcteryx Alpha SV gloves promises to be spectacular (and it better be at $275  a pair).  If you like leather gloves, Hestra Vertical Cut is a peerless product and would last you forever, mine is still going strong after 4-5 years of heavy use.  Hardware store gloves do work, but they require lots of aftermarket waterproofing, good care, they are just not as warm, and they will fail you on the worst day when you actually need them the most.     Hint- Rule #1 works well enough...



Regarding the Hestra heli guide glove with the removable liners.  I got a pair two seasons ago and I find that they get wet on the outside and the inside fairly easily and on more than one occassion, i've been pretty cold in them. I have extra liners and swap out the liners midday but they get wet quickly again.  I even wore them on a winter climb of Mt. Washington in NH and I damn near got frost nip wearing those gloves.  Well it left me extremely disappointed knowing all the rave reviews that they get and even claims of climbers using that glove on Everest.

 

For this season I ordered the Heli guide glove from First Ascent ( http://www.eddiebauer.com/catalog/product.jsp?ensembleId=37623&&categoryId=27379&categoryName=FIRST-ASCENT-MENS-ACCESSORIES&pCategoryId=27373&pCategoryName=FIRST-ASCENT-MENS&gpCategoryId=27372&gpCategoryName=FIRST-ASCENT&catPath=~~categoryId=27379~~categoryName=FIRST-ASCENT-MENS-ACCESSORIES~~pCategoryId=27373~~pCategoryName=FIRST-ASCENT-MENS~~gpCategoryId=27372~~gpCategoryName=FIRST-ASCENT&viewAll=y ) yesterday on cyber monday when they were discounted by 30%.

 

I'm hoping that they will keep the moisture out and allow my hands to breath better.

 

 

 

 

post #41 of 41

I've been using a pair like those described in thread link below for about 5 years now.  Still going strong, cost $15 at Costco.  But they may not work for everyone. I only ski about 20 days per season, mostly in the mid-Atlantic and have naturally hot hands.redface.gif  Also, in the spring I switch to even cheaper leather work gloves.

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/12161/head-gloves-at-costco

These may not be offered any longer at Costco, but most TJMaxx and Marshall's stores have a decent selection of ski gloves this time of year in the $20-40 range.

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