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Pole Sizes For The Park?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm starting to ski this year, and I'm going to be going to the park.  You may say not to go to the park because I'm just starting, but I learn things really quick.  I'm not trying to make myself sound good or anything (sorry if I am), but I pick up things really guick.  But anyways!  I know that for just regular poles, you want them to be from the ground right to your hand with your elbow at a 90 degree angle.  I was talking to my friend, and he said that for at the park, your poles should be shorter for more manueverability.  Is this in fact true?  Or is it just crap? lol

post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by P3RPL3N1NJ4 View Post

I'm starting to ski this year, and I'm going to be going to the park.  You may say not to go to the park because I'm just starting, but I learn things really quick.  I'm not trying to make myself sound good or anything (sorry if I am), but I pick up things really guick.  But anyways!  I know that for just regular poles, you want them to be from the ground right to your hand with your elbow at a 90 degree angle.  I was talking to my friend, and he said that for at the park, your poles should be shorter for more manueverability.  Is this in fact true?  Or is it just crap? lol



I think that's a Urban Legend.  And since Park skiers often ski in Urban areas...I'd take their word for it.  I've been skiing park since they blew up in 99, and I've always gone with the normal pole length.  But in honesty I have heard people tell me that, I just have been to stubborn/cheap to try it.  But thinking about it in my head piece, I could see a shorter pole being a benefit doing tricks, but it is a big sacrifice elsewhere.  The shortest pole I've ever used was a 48 instead of my regular 52, and it was annoying as hell pushing around on flatland.  Also unless you live on the East Coast, and follow the natural progression of park rats, inevitably you'll soon be trying tricks off cliffs in the back/side country, and in that case, you'll want longer poles...deep snow and all.

post #3 of 13

Shorter poles also come in handy when skiing bumps.  Regular length poles can knock you back seat if you don't plant them  all the way at the bottom of the rut/backside of the bump in the rut.  Having something a tad shorter allows more options for pole plants.  I also planted my left pole before throwing a heli-when I used to do them.  I'd imagine that a shorter pole would be better to plant on the high side of the halfpipe

post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Shorter poles also come in handy when skiing bumps.  Regular length poles can knock you back seat if you don't plant them  all the way at the bottom of the rut/backside of the bump in the rut.  Having something a tad shorter allows more options for pole plants.  I also planted my left pole before throwing a heli-when I used to do them.  I'd imagine that a shorter pole would be better to plant on the high side of the halfpipe


You're not supposed to plant poles whilst jumping.

post #5 of 13

Shorter poles can make things a bit easier in the park.  Just drop down 5cm (maybe up to 10cm) and you'll give yourself some easier movement without losing the ability to push along flats.

 

If you start mixing the park with moguls, you might notice that lots of serious bumpers (and most mogul competitors) go even shorter.

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post




You're not supposed to plant poles whilst jumping.


Obviously, you have never competed in ballet

 

What's balllet???

 

 

Old school helis are an exception to that.  Almost everyone planted a pole when starting a spin back then-.

 

 

EDIT:

Oh and back then before the stone age, (but not before skiing stoned) mogul events didn't use pre-made air bumps/jumps.  So, it was turn-plant-turn-plant-turn-plant-AIR!-turn-plant-turn-plant-turn-plant-AIR!-turn-plant-turn........  If you took two turns off to set uo for a jump you got docked, some.  Planting a pole gave the illusion that you linked turns right in to the air and then again linked turns out of it.


Edited by crgildart - 11/3/10 at 6:43pm
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post




Obviously, you have never competed in ballet

 

What's balllet???

 

 

Old school helis are an exception to that.  Almost everyone planted a pole when starting a spin back then-.



obvisouslly ski ballet is irrelavant:P

 

now acro ski this shit is rad!

 

post #8 of 13

^^^  The better kids were doing full twisting pole flips back in the day LOL.  That wasn't me, just skied ballet to get points for finishing a run.  Another thing about "acroski"  It hurts a lot more when you fall because you're going so damn slow.  You bounce and stick instead of skipping and sliding.  That's another reason I hated it.

post #9 of 13

Best stoke for the coming season I've seen so far. That was a peculiar mix of talent and ridiculous.

 

-Joe-

post #10 of 13


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post




Obviously, you have never competed in ballet

 

What's balllet???

 

 

Old school helis are an exception to that.  Almost everyone planted a pole when starting a spin back then-.

 

 

EDIT:

Oh and back then before the stone age, (but not before skiing stoned) mogul events didn't use pre-made air bumps/jumps.  So, it was turn-plant-turn-plant-turn-plant-AIR!-turn-plant-turn-plant-turn-plant-AIR!-turn-plant-turn........  If you took two turns off to set uo for a jump you got docked, some.  Planting a pole gave the illusion that you linked turns right in to the air and then again linked turns out of it.



Ok ballet and old school moguls are an exception, but since nobody does either anymore it's irrelevant (excluding of course those few who DO do it still, outside of the aforementioned nobody), and also, it should be noted, you don't plant a pole at the top of a halfpipe either.  If anything you plant a hand, but more than likely you just boost huge going plantless.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post


 you don't plant a pole at the top of a halfpipe either.  If anything you plant a hand, but more than likely you just boost huge going plantless.

I guess I don't understand why most people still use poles in the park at all.  I venture in to hit some of the small and medium tabletops and always try to plant a 4 point landing and use them turning of course.  Not sure why shorter poles would help there, especially since landings are steep and the goal is to plant out front of the boots downhill.
 

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



I guess I don't understand why most people still use poles in the park at all.  I venture in to hit some of the small and medium tabletops and always try to plant a 4 point landing and use them turning of course.  Not sure why shorter poles would help there, especially since landings are steep and the goal is to plant out front of the boots downhill.
 


Probably because you learn to ski with them unless you were really little when you learned, and it feels weird without them.  Plus IMO it looks silly. 

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post




Probably because you learn to ski with them unless you were really little when you learned, and it feels weird without them.  Plus IMO it looks silly. 


Haha, one of my freestyle coaches was actually one of those that skied ballet without poles.  He could still throw a 720.  He wore white gloves like a mime hahah

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