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Help with 2 ski quiver for Canadian Rockies - what widths? - Page 4

post #91 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by time2clmb View Post



 

I'm not from the East and have been here a hell of a lot longer than 6 weeks....
 

C'mon...every one sees right through your little smiley emoticons. You can't stand this. I see what happened here. Some guys that are more familiar with an area than you are disagreed with you, and it hurt your ego. Now you are on a mission to take down every one that has had a different opinion from you. You keep going on and on about the whole "locals" thing...this shows that you have some serious fucking issues. You want to talk about desperate? Your whole argument is desperate....and your childish rant on ski cred and all this other crap just smells of needing attention. 

 

 

 

 

 

What are you, 10 years old?

 

I wonder how much of this crap you would say in person? All this taunting and b.s. probably wouldn't last very long in the real world.
 



I am still waiting for some substance....

 

Take your time, dont rush.

post #92 of 109


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

 

But I do agree that a firm snow ski for lean years is a good idea for Banff...but that is 70mm max, not 85.....

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

95mm on that stuff and you will be hating life.  Sure on the Coast or the Interior those conditions are much rarer...but Banff?  Fairly common.  So like I said, a Banff 2 ski quiver that I would recommned would be a "70 somthing" for when it doesnt snow...and a "90 somthing" for when it does. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

My advice stands...70somthing/90somthing...unless you "pick your days" for fresh snow then go 80somthing/100somthing...

 

If you feel the need for 110+...go for it...no skin off my nose, but it just dont seem the conditons warrant it as the Banff contingent is now seeming to acknowledge.


 


The defense rests your honor.....

 

 

And stop mis-quoting the 2-3cm..... (You must love Fox news eh?)

 

Regular 2-3cm top-ups that provide fresh snow ontop of a base that is not "Hard-Pack" and doesnt melt until spring..... Means we have soft snow most of the time....not too hard to comprehend?

 

Of course when the storms come through there is more......

 

 

And from my season in Vermnt and Seasons in NZ..... I'm very aware of what hard snow is, and very much enjoy skiing it..... I prefer the soft stuff more......  

 

If you read my original post I said I did a season fine on 82mm skis..... Then I got some 110mm and found them being my go to daily driver with a few exceptions.

post #93 of 109

It's starting to make sense now, Skidude72 used to live somewhere in the west and did a bunch of full 100+ day seasons back in the 80's or early 90s. He was then forced to move east because of family/career related reasons and is resentful of the fact. He is now attempting to assert his credibility from a past ski life.

 

A bunch of people who currently live and ski in the area the OP is asking about chime in with advice on what has worked for them based on their personal experience with modern equipment in the past few years. Skidude72 is upset as the advice does not jive with what worked for him back in the pre-fat skis era. Skidude72 displays his ignorance of the subject with statements about it taking hours of hiking into the BC to access powder, 95mm skis causing knee pain on hardpack, rockered fat skis being only for movie stars in AK etc. Hilarity ensues.

post #94 of 109

Naw, I think skidude just has higher standards for hard snow performance than the other posters.  It would be fun to find out though..

post #95 of 109

Sounds like you have the right idea. I'd go with at most mid-80s for harder snow days, bumps, etc. and one of:

 

fast expert, large open bowls, decent width to trees - 100-115 stiff traditional camber, tip rocker (i.e. RC112)

average expert, average bowls, semi-tight trees - 100-115 softer flat or traditional camber, tip rocker, minimal tail rocker (i.e. Katana)

anyone, ~untracked bowls, tight trees - 5-point ski (i.e. S7)

 

If you go with the 5-point ski, you won't have anything for ripping open turns in chop, but the payoff is there, if you ski a lot of tight trees.

 

As an everyday, quiver-of-one, I'd go 95-105 with traditional camber and, if you can find it, a modest early-rise tip.

post #96 of 109
Thread Starter 

So for my wide ski i narrow it down to the katana, olympus, wrenegade, or lhasa pow.  Pick one for me and i buy.

post #97 of 109

I'd lean towards the Wrenegades, unless you ski tight trees, where the pintail and larger tip rocker of the Lhasa would pay off (losing some stability).

post #98 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

Banff is great, dont get me wrong, but the reality is it does farily often guy dry spells of no snow and minus 25C temperatures.  In those conditons you want a hard snow ski....95mm on that stuff and you will be hating life.  Sure on the Coast or the Interior those conditions are much rarer...but Banff?  Fairly common.  So like I said, a Banff 2 ski quiver that I would recommned would be a "70 somthing" for when it doesnt snow...and a "90 somthing" for when it does.   When it dont snow in Banff and gets cold, the snow gets hard and packed...it is not like Whistler where it just gets "mushy" or the Interior where it tends to stay, well pretty good.


I think you nailed it with those comments (although there of lots of 95mm skis that do just fine on hard pack... I like the Head John 94, a "Big Mountain" category ski that is the most versatile ski in Head's lineup and which spadout.com refers to as a "one ski quiver").  Conditions here alternate between short dry spells where conditions are hard and windpacked, and times of extremely dry and light fresh, and a ski for both of these situations is perfect for the region. 

 

Personally, I do about 80% of my skiing in the region on a 65mm ski and the biggest I have is the afore mentioned 94mm John 95, and it works just fine in everything off-piste (and is remarkably good on groomers too).

 

And to the O.P., you're looking for a two ski 'holster', not a quiver.  biggrin.gif


Edited by exracer - 12/2/10 at 8:44pm
post #99 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonowakes View Post

So for my wide ski i narrow it down to the katana, olympus, wrenegade, or lhasa pow.  Pick one for me and i buy.


Lhasa. Now go keep your promise. wink.gif

post #100 of 109


What does need have to do with ANYTHING? You don't need cheater "shaped" skis with "edges" and  "ski boots", do you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post



 

Quote:

 

If you think that a 110-115 is needed to ski in big storms, from the lift....go for it.  I wont agree. 

 


 

post #101 of 109

I skied everything in Banff on a 91mm Armada ARV up till this season. Bit of a jack-of-all-trades, master of none (except maybe trees in a bit of pow).  Now I have a 70mm and 111mm. Haven't used the 111mm yet, but the difference in edging hard pack between the 70mm and the 91mm is huge. If there's been around two weeks without decent snow, the 70mm come out for resort skiing every time.

post #102 of 109



ski big3:

 

good to hear you still like a good carver: just bought (new 'slightly used' rossi zenith z9 for those more hard packed days at my local mtn here in the PNW)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiBig3 View Post

I skied everything in Banff on a 91mm Armada ARV up till this season. Bit of a jack-of-all-trades, master of none (except maybe trees in a bit of pow).  Now I have a 70mm and 111mm. Haven't used the 111mm yet, but the difference in edging hard pack between the 70mm and the 91mm is huge. If there's been around two weeks without decent snow, the 70mm come out for resort skiing every time.


Edited by canali - 12/8/10 at 3:32pm
post #103 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiBig3 View Post

I skied everything in Banff on a 91mm Armada ARV up till this season. Bit of a jack-of-all-trades, master of none (except maybe trees in a bit of pow).  Now I have a 70mm and 111mm. Haven't used the 111mm yet, but the difference in edging hard pack between the 70mm and the 91mm is huge. If there's been around two weeks without decent snow, the 70mm come out for resort skiing every time.


Same experience with me.  I find myself on race skis about 80% of the time in Banff.  I never seem to hit the conditions right (or should I say the conditions never hit me right, when my skiing is limited to weekends?)

post #104 of 109

Sounds like so far it's been a season for race skis around Banff :) -- as long as you don't mind possibly hitting rocks on even the groomers.

post #105 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post

Sounds like so far it's been a season for race skis around Banff :) -- as long as you don't mind possibly hitting rocks on even the groomers.



Things have changed overnight, 24cm in the past 24 hours, its gonna be a fun weekend!

post #106 of 109
Thread Starter 

I just placed the order for my wide skis.  Ended up picking for the 186 Lhasa.  (I kept my promise Beyond).

 

I put too much thought into this.  I liked the sound/price/look of the Wrens but that 191cm and stiffer flex scares me.  ONp3 looks like an awesome company though and I talked to Scott there who was helpful.  I will watch their gear closely.

 

I am going to rock my titan 9's for another season with them and maybe look for an 177 Elan Apex deal in the off season.

 

I hope I did the right thing.  My wife will spas when she sees the credit card.

 

Thanks for the help. 

post #107 of 109
Thread Starter 

I got the Lhasa's out to Castle mountain over Christmas and they did not disappoint.  Got them on some groomers, where the pretty much ripped (not like my titan 9's but pretty good). Spent most of the day on some tracked out windblown pow in the trees and these rocked (castle said about 60cm's in last 2 days but i would say 30cms).  I was surprised how maneuverable these were in the trees.  I had to get some speed up first but then these just destroyed.  I was pretty stoked and let out a few woots on my first run through the trees when I slashed a few turns.  Awesome.  I was happy it was so easy to adjust to this much larger, totally different ski shape.  I haven't figured them out in the bumps yet and was dreading them a bit when i ventured into them.  Definately a great choice for a versatile wide ski in my quiver and you could easily ski these all the time.  + man are these light.  Can't wait for a real snow day to see these really shine.  Damn you Castle for being a little optimistic on your snow report.

post #108 of 109
Thread Starter 

As my narrower ski I went with the Elan apex 177.  I got these out to Lake Louise on Saturday and they are just what I was looking for.  They are a bit less stable at speed than my 181 blue Titan 9's but still darn good.  They also have a bit less energy out of the turns.  However they are so smooth and easy to turn.  Way easier to ski and way better in the bumps and cut up foot of fresh they had on saturday.  Perfect for me.

 

I could have maybe gone for something narrower like the mx78 for the narrower ski but am pretty stoke on the elan's.  They are truly a great ski.  I have yet to put the Lhasa's in some real deep powder but the forecast is looking good (for skiing anyways) and all the hills around here got a pretty good dump this weekend. 

 

I am very happy with my decision so thanks for the input.  I definately blew my ski budget for a few years. 

post #109 of 109

This thread is nice and aged, and carries some valuable information for me as I plan on moving to revy/golden this winter. I have some related question on a good quiver for this region, and any advice is very appreciated. I wholeheartedly agree that the further west one gets towards the mountains, particularly during la ninas years apparently, the wider a daily driver becomes. My question is an expansion on the above thread as I am curious about binding. I spent last season on a dynastar slicer out east, which I really enjoyed for trees as a all mountain ski in northern Vermont, and only took out my slalom skis twice to slash the bluest of ice. 

 

I am 165lbs, a smooth starightline skier in open areas, while very light on my edges (finesse) in the trees, with a technical race background. I want to know suggestions on how to complete a quiver for a year of buming out in the interior. I don't mind earning my turns, and have BD method boots for AT, but am discouraged at the price of dynafit bindings.  I prefer slightly damper skis, to slarvy one such as the S7, which I found too 1-Dimensional (super in 188cm might fix this?) and liked the new verdict when I tried it. I have not been on skis longer than 185cm, as I always take em short for the tighter JayPeak glades. The last time I visited the interior much of the sidcountry stuff this lowly tourist skied was bootpack accessed, so I am not sure I want to slap a duke on my charging powder ski (maybe zealot,cochise?), or fork out a months pay on dynafit and then put on a ski that would greatly benefit form a wider, heavier binding on the down? I get the feel that unless exclusive to a powder touring setup, dynafits might not be good for resort powder charging on a ski like the zealot. I want to keep my slicer with my pivots as my resort ski, but cannot resolve my dilemma on how tour specific I should get, as sidecontry would seem to demand a hefty compromise with heavy dukes to really enjoy the down. Any opinions or thought on this rambling conundrum of mine would be helpful, especially if you ski in this areas.

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