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kick waxing normal skis?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I was thinking about options that are faster than skiining for long rolling or mostly flat aproach. Does kick waxing work on normal ptex base skis?

 

post #2 of 12

You can try it and cork a bunch tip to tail, but with alpine skis, you do not have the double camber/wax pocket off nordic skis. The kicking action pressures the mid section of the ski so the grip/kick wax makes contact with the snow and 'grabs' the snow, propelling you forward. When released, you glide on the tips and tails, not the grip zone.

 

Waxing skins, patterned based skis, mohair or mohair mix skins, kicker skins or narrow strip skins offer other and better options than grip wax on alpine skis. Plus you don't have to scrape off the grip wax to apply skins for steeper sections or descents.

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the feedback. I have kicker skins as well as wall to wall full skins. I was hoping that grip wax would be faster. Perhaps not. I did a few google searches for "kick wax AT" and found like 4 real results  including my own thread. So yea... I guess this is not a popular option.

 

I was thinking that the full grip wax would be nice if I could do quick laps with out having to scrape it off. I may play around wiht this and see how it goes.


Edited by tromano - 11/1/10 at 2:49pm
post #4 of 12

Sounds like you could use these.

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

Sounds like you could use these.


Waxless metal edge fats are what gave me the idea in the first palce. I am an XC jong so I though what if I used kick wax and my own skis to make something similar to these: http://www.rei.com/product/805197   ?

 

I like the way my nordicas ski but wanted to modify them to be a bit faster on the flats.

post #6 of 12

If it's more about the tour, patterned/waxless skis work great and are very efficient and get you out the door easier and faster. Those Rossis look interesting as a rugged touring option. You can also add skins for steeper climbs. Use liquid or spray on wax after cleaning bases for better glide and avoid icy build up underfoot. I spend a lot of time on patterned based skis for low angle tours and occasional turns. Definitely worth adding a pair to your touring quiver.

post #7 of 12

very interesting! I was unaware that a skis like the  Rosi and Annum existed.  That would indeed be handy, as as mentioned you could still always carry skins for steeper stuff.

 

It looks like they only work with a tele setup though, not AT?

 

cheers

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncski2010 View Post

very interesting! I was unaware that a skis like the  Rosi and Annum existed.  That would indeed be handy, as as mentioned you could still always carry skins for steeper stuff.

 

It looks like they only work with a tele setup though, not AT?

 

cheers

 

They work with either; the feel of the glide will be different but the ski will work.     The Madshus had a previous incarnation as the Karhu XCD Guide.  Alpina also make one that is a bit more slalomy: the Alpina Cross Terrain.

 

Be aware that the flex and heft of these may not be what you're used to from the downhilling world.    

 

Skins, because they cover the entire length of the ski, tend to mask the unfortunate tendency of stiffer alpine skis to backslide when the grip zone is directly under and slightly in front of the foot.    The weight issue with alpine gear is also obvious on the uphill slog.


Edited by comprex - 11/2/10 at 8:16am
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Waxless metal edge fats are what gave me the idea in the first palce.

 

Were you around on DCski when Denis got his Visu Avalanches, the waxless no-edge fat skis?

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post



 

Were you around on DCski when Denis got his Visu Avalanches, the waxless no-edge fat skis?


 

Nope. I will go check it out.
 

post #11 of 12

Waxing an AT ski with kick wax should work. Wax the middle 1/3 of the ski with the XC kick wax that matches the snow temperature. If you still need more kick extend the area being waxed and/or add a warmer wax in the center. The wood XC skis I started on back in the day had little or no actual camber and that's how we waxed them.  Key is it would work better in dry, cold, new snow not requiring a klister wax.  A couple of tins of XC hard wax and a cork weighs only a few ounces. Give it a shot, but bring your skins. PS- hard XC kick wax won't hurt your downhill glide much.

post #12 of 12

As someone who has done a bunch of XC Skiing in my distant pass, I don't think that kick wax will work very well on an AT ski.  As Alpinord pointed out the kick wax works because of the shuffle of the traditional diagonal stride and the double camber of traditional XC Skis.  I've used it with limited success on telemark equipment.  Its harder to do on tele gear because of the single camber nature of the skis making the wax pocket less effective and the weight of the stouter gear making harder to put out and maintain the energy level needed to perform an effective diagonal stride.  I used wax on my tele gear when I was in leather boots, light bindings, and skinny long skis.  I wouldn't even bother with my current set-up.  IME for wax to work at all on an AT set-up, it will have to be very soft, maybe even a klister.  This very sticky wax will heavily impede your downhill ability and be a pain to remove.  The hinge point and the nature of the AT boot/binding interface will make a decent diagonal stride impossible.  You will be plodding anyway so why not use skins.  I've played around with partial skins and they can work pretty well, definitely better than wax if your going to be making turns later.  

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