EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Is it beneficial to ski with untuned skis?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is it beneficial to ski with untuned skis? - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Her skis will be waxed.  I'm fully aware that speed should be controlled by technique.  My point, though maybe not clear, was that she will prefer to go slow and if there was a wax that did that, she would want it.
 


It may seem that way, but really the drag in the lift/lodge area and other flat places will very quickly outweigh any benefits she might get from her skis not gliding too fast.  Waxed skis will also work better for any kind of slow speed pivoting moves. 

 

I suggest you make inquiries re a good instructor and get her some private lessons so she can get through the wedge phase quickly (while skiing slowly).

post #32 of 48

 

OK.  My fault for bringing my wife into the fray but this is a thread on skiing tuned or un-tuned.  I was only trying to make the point that there are different tunes for different abilities/styles and whatnot, but no matter the abilities or style, you are still better off with a tune than no tune.  I feel confident in saying I did a poor job of making that point since there are at least three posts about my wife's future ski instruction and not about what the OP brought up - "Is it beneficial to ski with untuned skis?"

 

I'm probably one of the bigger offenders of hi-jacking threads, but I swear, skiers are the largest population of people with ADD there is! 

 

When it comes to my wife's ski's, I feel confident in saying she will have the best tuned skis of any Never Ever on the mountain, and the skis will be tuned to her abilities.  She is already set up for instruction from a very competent instructor who has done a wonderful job in the past in similar scenarios and is a blast to be with.  I would even bet they become friends if for no other reason, so they can continue to make fun of me.  They are already acquaintances and both are looking forward to it.

 

So, "Is it beneficial to ski with untuned skis?"

 

OOO

XXX,

Ken

post #33 of 48

I had my "good" skis (and only useable pair) tuned (base repaired after a core shot in the end of last season and waxed, edges sharpened) this summer, for  the first time since I bought them, in the 2008-2009 season. Did I feel the difference (skis getting "worse" as time was going by)? Of course. 

As said, a perfectly tuned skis is good on the hardpack, icy groomed runs of the Dolomites, but an untuned ski can still go well in tight deep fresh snow or in the naturally transformed sown fields of a place that grooms less maniscally the area of pertinence...

This said, I'd rather have the skis correctly tuned than not.

post #34 of 48

I daresay you could have a tune that's inappropriate for your skill level. Disclaimer: I'm nowhere near an expert on tuning. That said, providing a beginner with a ski tuned for racing may be a recipe for disaster. I wonder if people who find themselves "catching an edge" fairly frequently might, in rare cases, have such a tune. 

post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

I daresay you could have a tune that's inappropriate for your skill level. Disclaimer: I'm nowhere near an expert on tuning. That said, providing a beginner with a ski tuned for racing may be a recipe for disaster. I wonder if people who find themselves "catching an edge" fairly frequently might, in rare cases, have such a tune. 



If someone is used to skiing with dulled edges and a big base bevel, they will definitely notice a big difference and a lot more "hookyness" and caught edges if they get a properly tuned ski. 

 

However it's more likely to be a problem if the jump to an expert carving ski from a beginner ski, and even at that it should only take a couple of hours for an intermediate skier to get used to. 

post #36 of 48

Why put oil in your engine or air in your tires?   Find an old iron at a garage sale, get a edge tuner and buy some wax.  It takes about an hour to do and it doesn't cost a lot.  In other words, don't be stupid, keep your equipment tuned!!!!!  It doesn't have to cost a lot of money for the basics. 

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob4snow View Post

Why put oil in your engine or air in your tires?   Find an old iron at a garage sale, get a edge tuner and buy some wax.  It takes about an hour to do and it doesn't cost a lot.  In other words, don't be stupid, keep your equipment tuned!!!!!  It doesn't have to cost a lot of money for the basics. 



Agreed, i just wax scrape and brush my own, no edge tuning, i have them tuned mid and end of the season. I bought a 20 dollar bar of wax and waxed one pair of skis 15 times and another 6 times, less than a dollar a wax, plus a 40 dollar iron because i couldnt find any old irons in town. Well worth having properly waxed skis each day, bases stay cleaner and most importantly, their faster smile.gif))

post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob4snow View Post

Why put oil in your engine or air in your tires?   Find an old iron at a garage sale, get a edge tuner and buy some wax.  It takes about an hour to do and it doesn't cost a lot.  In other words, don't be stupid, keep your equipment tuned!!!!!  It doesn't have to cost a lot of money for the basics. 


 

bob4snow: Waxing is easy. I'm reticent to sharpen my own edges though as I've been led to believe that there's much more potential to ruin your skis when you haven't learned to do it. (Not to create a circular argument; you have to learn sometime, but all my friends get their skis tuned at the shop so I simply don't have a mentor.)

post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

I get my skis serviced once at the start of a season, and that it. On my last post I asked for advice about skiing ice, and now I think I should try sharpening them occasionally. My reasoning for not making the effort to do this was that if I can ski icy condition with no edges, imagine how good I' be if I only got my edges tuned.

 

It now makes me wonder if there are any benefits to riding untuned, unsharpened skis.

It depends on the definition of "I can ski", you might be just surviving, then again, you might be great.  But how would you know how much you're handicapping yourself?

I look at it from the viewpoint that if my skis are tuned, I can't blame the equipment.  Keeps me honest.
 

post #40 of 48


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post




 

bob4snow: Waxing is easy. I'm reticent to sharpen my own edges though as I've been led to believe that there's much more potential to ruin your skis when you haven't learned to do it. (Not to create a circular argument; you have to learn sometime, but all my friends get their skis tuned at the shop so I simply don't have a mentor.)

It is hard to ruin your skis so long as you are not messing too much with filing the base edge*  (just very, very lightly hone it after side filing and/or take out the occasional burr with a smooth stone).  There is a ton of great tuning information on this site and all over the Internet.  A lot of great information comes from the sponsors of Epic Ski that sell high quality tuning equipment.  Once get the hang of it, the only decisions are how manical you want to be (powder and recreational skis don't need a 5 stone World Cup progression, but I imagine some people make those edges as sharp as a sushi master's knife) and whether to slightly dull the edges around your tips and tails or not.  The argument on dulling is one that can only be settled by personal preference.

 

* Assuming the base edge is set to your liking, which is more than likely the angle the manufacturer used during the manufacturing process.
 

post #41 of 48

Tuning and waxing your skis takes less time and is less taxing than reading this thread.

 

Just Do It and enjoy the results. After all, it's where the rubber meets the road and is were it's happening.......

post #42 of 48

If your skis aren't running well, you hold up people on traverse tracks, or you have to keep stepping out of the track.

post #43 of 48

Basic tuning of your skis is easy and I learned on the Internet and some easy reading.  Waxing is the easy part but the side and bevel tools they have today are almost idiot proof.  The only thing you really need to research is what the manufacturer recommends as the side and base bevel angle for your particular ski.  A decent sharpening tool will allow you to easily dial in the angles.  I even learned how to do some simple repair work on the bases.  They only thing you can't do that a pro shop can do is grind down the base on either a stone grinder or a belt grinder.  Believe me, once you do a little research, it's simpler than it looks and it will save you a lot of money. 

post #44 of 48

Fill the gouges, make them flat and sharp, then a little wax for appropriate temperature range isn't rocket science.  But, I can see a very mild learning experience to trying to ski on fully detuned skis on bulletpoof ice. When I was 7 starting hockey my dad made me go to the first practice on a pair of 15 year old hand me down skates that were also three sizes too big.  What was the learning experience?  You can get seriously hurt if you don't take adequate steps to be sure you have proper gear in proper condition when negotiating ice.

post #45 of 48

I usually have my skis tuned or touched up every 3-5 days of skiing.  It really makes a difference, tune them left and right and they will last longer. Something that really helps me is keeping a stone with me on the slopes, I have the skis fairly sharp and if the feel grabby for the conditions, I simply detune the tip and tail to fit the conditions.   I was in a local Denver ski store a couple of years ago, and saw a lighltly used pair  of Elan Magnums for $200.  They had maybe one day on them.  I grabbed them and took them out.  They were absolutely horrible, and I could barely keep up with the kids.  Took them to the best ski tech on the planet- Dutch at Night Hawk in Steamboat Springs.  Bammm! The next day they were incredible.  

 

Long story short- the ski shop sold a very expensive set of skis and did not tune them before they went out the door.  The customer must have been so disapointed they brought them back.  Find a good ski tuner at a real shop.  Not some highschool kid that runs the ski over a belt or through a machine and slaps some wax on them and thats it.  Ski tuning is an art and worth every penny or  six pack, or cookies or whatever.  

post #46 of 48

If there's some major burrage from skiing all day on jagged rocks, I'll stone it down. I'll repair core shots. I'll wax for about every 4-5 days. That's about it. I never sharpen or bevel my edges or worry about a perfectly flat correctly structured base. Keep in mind that I'd rather not ski than ski on hard snow. If I mainly raced DH you bet I would care a lot more about the whole tuning thing.

 

The benefits I've noticed are:

 

1) I don't waste a bunch of time working on my skis.

2) I don't worry that I'm not going to be able to make it down to the road because I don't have the correct edge bevel.

3) I don't have to shell out any $$ for stone grinding.

post #47 of 48

Don't worry; Be happy!rolleyes.gif

 

Sheesh!eek.gif

post #48 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post




Is that p-tex repair still holding jimmy?



We dripped about a yard on that ski last week. There was a bit of the blue knob repair left but man that ski took a beating last year. Funny how the other ski really was OK, maybe dripped about 3". All waxed and ready.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Is it beneficial to ski with untuned skis?