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Trees and Bumps

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I'd like to get some feedback on choosing an all mountain ski that dominates in the trees and bumps but also performs well in other areas of the mountain and at least doesn't let me sink in the powder. Tough to find?

post #2 of 15

 

You are not providing nearly enough info about your size, where you ski, your ability, and your priorities. What you have been skiing on and how you'd like to improve over that ski is also useful as well. These two threads have quite a number of model reviews that might work for you. Do a little homework and see what sounds good to you.

 

My initial impression would be the "One" by Blizzard but I could be way off.

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/96369/the-crazy-88s-revisited-2011-mini-reviews

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/92748/western-daily-drivers-in-the-90-100mm-range

 

SJ

post #3 of 15

This is your 3rd separate thread about skiing, ah, what your hook implies. Agree with SJ that it would be helpful to know more about where you ski, your size, style, level, skis you already like/use, and so on. In the MX88 threads, you seem to imply you spend a lot of time in bumps and trees. If that's a priority, you'll get different recs than if it's just one kind of terrain you will deal with regularly. Keep in mind that no ski, not even the MX88 (sorry Phil), will be equally good in all possible situations. Thus, a priority list...

post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

You're absolutely right. That question was pretty vague. I'm 26 years old, 5'10-ish, about 190 pounds. I would say I'm an aggressive expert skier who prefers interesting, challenging trails over straight steeps. Spend most of my time on the east coast at Killington, Sunday River, Stowe, etc.. but am out west for 10 days a year. Currently skiing on a pair of Salomon X Wing's which are a bit too narrow in the waist for powder days. Like I said, I spend most of my time in the trees, on bumps, and am otherwise cruising all over the mountain. Looking for something that will be maneuverable and responsive in tight areas but will also provide some surface area for powder days. 

post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

This is your 3rd separate thread about skiing, ah, what your hook implies. Agree with SJ that it would be helpful to know more about where you ski, your size, style, level, skis you already like/use, and so on. In the MX88 threads, you seem to imply you spend a lot of time in bumps and trees. If that's a priority, you'll get different recs than if it's just one kind of terrain you will deal with regularly. Keep in mind that no ski, not even the MX88 (sorry Phil), will be equally good in all possible situations. Thus, a priority list...


No need to be sorry, but I agree with you no ski is great everywhere but if I was to choose one ski.... 

 

The OP might be a bit new to the internet and forums and dare I post the "use the search" video but in asking a question, it is best to keep it on ONE area so the answers can be more direct. SJ brought up some good questions and that we need more info to answer you.

 

I will add..trees and bumps..where? Mad River Glen? Okemo? Jackson Hole? Alpine Meadows? Winterpark/Mary Jane? While there are a few similarities to the needs of a tree or bump ski there are differences too such as true bump skis are very skinny and sink on powder. We feel like Dr. Evil...."We need the iiiinfo.."

post #6 of 15

The OP posted the same time I did. So we want a bump ski that is good on eastern roots and rocks (Kton and SR) and still work out west. Unless you have deep pockets and disregard for your gear, I would drop the MX88 from your list but I would stay in that category. Check out SJ's Crazy 88's thread. Most any of those skis would be great for what you are looking for. 

post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys, and you're right, I am new to the website and just learning the ropes here.  Most of my tree skiing is done in fairly steep settings with little room to maneuver (Killington: Growler, Centerpiece, Julio) as examples. I wouldn't really classify myself as a bump skier in the Olympic sense of the word. I'm not flying off the tops of the bumps and bracing myself for large air. I sky the divots of the bumps, always under control but aggressively and with strength and precision. As far as powder goes, Im not overly concerned about finding a wide ski as my days are usually limited....I would just like something that will hold up and allow me to feel comfortable (not like I'm going to sink).  I am strong for my size and can handle a powerful ski but have knee and back problems which limit my strength later in the day so a ski that doesnt make me do all the work would be ideal. I have skied on Salomons my whole life but have recently been pushed to explore other options (K2 Apache Xplorer, Kastle MX88 to name a few). Let me know if there is anything else I can provide which would help. 

post #8 of 15

Scratch the Blizzard "One" recommendation....not the right tool.

 

SJ

post #9 of 15

Explorer and MX88 are two completely different skis in how they react on snow. The Explorer is a Lexus and the MX is a Porsche, at 26 you are not old enough to ski an Explorer. To way over simplify, If you can ski bumps you can ski bumps, especially where you say you are skiing. You and I are not much different in size, but I do have 20 years of age and experience on you. Skis that I liked (other than the magnificent MX88). I would not dismiss something  leftover do to the damage of the rocks and roots, but a popular 177-180 length were pretty common.  

 

Flat:

Elan Apex (formerly the 888)

Nordica HR Burner (flat)

Prophet 90

Dynastar Sultan 85

Volkl Kendo

 

System:

Blizzard 8.7

Aftershock

post #10 of 15

I hafta' say, the skis don't ski the trees, the skier does. If you mean a ski you can turn quickly, maybe that gives back some energy in rebound, then there you have it. I be that Sultan 85 is great. In trees, you have to be able to release the tails to maintain a constant speed, so dynastar will always be a good choice as they are designed to accomodate tail release style skiing in certain model series (Legend in the past)

post #11 of 15

Well I am also an eastern skier who loves to ski bumps and trees when conditions allow.  Right now my all mountain ski of choice is the Volkl AC30 170 cm.  I am 5'9" and 195 lbs and ski hard and aggressively and when conditions are right you will never find me on the groomed.

 

To put it mildly I love these AC30's.  They do everything I ask of them with out a complaint.  They turn fairly quick (16.7 M radius) and handle mixed snow very well.  You can charge down the fall line old school style or lay them on edge and go new school.  Lots of energy and pretty forgiving.

 

Give them a try, you just may fall in love as I did.

 

Rick G

post #12 of 15

Seeking bumps + knee and back issues = impressive pain tolerance. But I digress. Agree with several others here that something in the mid to high 80's would be your sweet spot; if you were more about trees I'd say go up 10-15 mm from that, but you're not. Also agree about skis like Nordica Burners (or Watea 84's) ; no metal makes them light and supple, which is a good thing for bumps. For same reasons cannot love the Kendo or several others mentioned. 8.7's may be a special case, they are too stiff for bumps, but the flex pattern gives them an easy finish. I found them pretty good even in refrozen stuff. OTOH, their liveliness may not agree with your knees.

 

I'd argue, ultimately, for a K2 Extreme. (Yeah, me arguing for a K2.  What's the world coming to?) Because a twin is much nicer in bumps and tight places than a flat tail, because as usual last season's are silly cheap if you scratch around so who cares if you destroy them in the woods, because the torsion box gives them some bite and energy (well, for a K2), but they are still damp and forgiving, which your body likely would appreciate. OK, they're not gonna be superb like a 8.7 in terms of bite, or blast through crud like a Sultan 85, but still OK those ways, and the other attributes make them best of show! Are you listening, BWPA? Second place, Prophet 90's. Third place, Head Mojo 90's. (Would be second if they still made them, but they can be found.)

post #13 of 15

+1 for the K2s.  My friend got them last year, loves them.  Topsheets may scratch, but the bases are bulletproof.  Can be found brand new with griffon schizo bindings for <$500

post #14 of 15

if you chooses trees over bummps more of the time there is no better ski I have found for HARD pack trees than the 'the one" the impersicion that the rocker brings let you rally it though trees faster than anything even the old extremes... its also not as bad at high endge angle on hard snow as you would think. 

 

post #15 of 15

Quote:

Originally Posted by beyond View Post

 Head Mojo 90's. (Would be second if they still made them, but they can be found.)


They have the female topsheet version of this ski on level9 for under $200. 

 

Evo has the extreme for 300 as well.

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