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Boot Heaters 2011

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I have been using the Therm-ic for several years but they always seems to die on me for one reason or annother. Now I need to buy new ones. I would like to stick to Therm-ic since its easy to get spare parts and footbeds with the heater pre-installed etc. Whats the thing to buy today?

post #2 of 19

hot-tronics. been using the same battery packs for 3 years no problems.

post #3 of 19
Boot heaters are the bane of many bootfitters. Fickle battery systems, poor installations and lots of abuse all contribute to the poor performance associated with boot heaters. Even the spendy Thermic heaters aren't all that great.



Boot shops like the $200-$400 add on sale.



Unless there is an underlying medical condition like Raynaud's Disease (poor circulation in the extremities), dress correctly and get Inutuion liners.



Nearly 100% of the time, when skiers are looking to purchase boot warmers, I suggest Intuition liners- the results are terrific.
post #4 of 19

My feet sweat like maniacs, well I sweat like a maniac. So my feet get wet quickly, even with frequent sock changes I get cold feet. Perhaps intution liners could help, though I have found the heaters do an okay job of keeping my feet warm in anything above -10F.

post #5 of 19

I use to always ski in race fit foamed liners and they were cold.  I always used Hotronic and was under the impression that they were the superior product.

post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiing-in-Jackson View Post


Unless there is an underlying medical condition like Raynaud's Disease (poor circulation in the extremities), dress correctly and get Inutuion liners.

Nearly 100% of the time, when skiers are looking to purchase boot warmers, I suggest Intuition liners- the results are terrific.



SIJ is correct.  I have Intuition liners and had to get Boot Gloves because on wind chill of - 20 days my feet were still sweating and would then get cold.  Add the boot glove and they sweat more but don't get cold.  I usually only needed to do this on race nights; it would be really cold, my feet would sweat and then I had to stand in line for a while. 

 

I've also found that I need to unbuckle my boots after a run to let some heat out.  Has nothing to do with the fit.

post #7 of 19

Hot tromics are my boot heater of choice.  Sweaty feet can get colder more quickly, even with intuitions and boot heaters.  My feet also sweat like crazy -- since I started using an anti-perspirant cream on my feet, they sweat less when I ski and are warmer.  One of the tricks is to apply the cream the night before, to allow it to work properly.  My Intuition liners have improved my chronic cold feet issues, but many days I need the boot heaters also. 

post #8 of 19

I used to have hotronics, the batteries do go bad after many uses & won't hold a charge.

 

I Have had thermics for the past 4 seasons & the batteries also go bad eventually.

 

Both systems seem to work about the same.  I have thin lange race liners & poor circulation in my feet.

 

Skiing would suck for me many days without them.

 

JF

post #9 of 19

I have the Thermic Supermax that are now 3-4 seasons old I think. I'd agree if there are other methods to keep your toes warm (Intuitions etc) that's probably a better strategy.  I also think you need to be sure the charge is completely used up before recharging the batteries. With mine, it seems one battery outlasts the other.

 

If you're going to have any boot work done they end up being a PITA to work around. All that being said, our winter's here are really damp  and the fact I can keep my toes wam for most of the day is as they say; priceless.

 

Skiing out west on trips I rarely use them . I can only explain  that as the humidity being lower than here in the east when temps are equivalent. At the end of the day, best $200 I ever spent.

post #10 of 19

I've seen top skiers out for a film shoot. Some wear boot heaters for all the standing around waiting for the camera. One of the guys is a daredevil skier with a million broken bones. He uses them.

post #11 of 19

The key to warm feet is a dry liner. 

 

Skiers come in and ask for boot warmers and they've been skiing in a sopping wet liner for X days.  The thought is drying one's boots each night is a completely new concept.

 

Every boot I sell, I show the skier how to remove and put back in the liner.  It is super easy (look for a how-to thread shortly)!  I suggest boot dryers to every customer, but explain that they really only work well when the liner is removed from the shell.  Water trapped between the liner and shell just doesn't get dried went your boots are really wet.  Often the mesh lining next to the sock feels dry, only to have the foam/insulation still completely wet underneath.

 

For best results, take out the liner and use boot driers.  You'll be amazed.  The most ski boot liners have plenty enough insulation to keep the average foot warm.  The liner just has to be dry. 

post #12 of 19

I have four pairs of the same boots around the continent, so putting new liners x 4 would get a bit pricey.

 

I have a problem when skiing pow all day -  my boots get cold. I use Ther-mic and have had the same problem regarding battery packs (useless after a couple of years), and even when new, they won't last all day on a higher charge when in pow. My simple answer has been to get the battery packs that take AAA batteries, put fresh batteries in in the morning, then have a replacement set in my pack if they start to get low. You can use rechargeables if the green thiong is an issue (my experience - they don't last long taking new charges - even top-of-the-line so I use new batteries). Solves the problem.

 

PS, I have boot driers that I use every evening with the liners removed, but when there's pow, the boots get cold on me.

post #13 of 19
Do what it takes to mount the battery on the side where it is clear from the lift.
post #14 of 19

Sort of OT - anyone have plans for a homemade boot drier - that is easily portable?

 

Thanks

 

post #15 of 19


 

Quote:

Originally Posted by dwoof2 View Post

Sort of OT - anyone have plans for a homemade boot drier - that is easily portable?

 

Thanks

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/76426/homemade-boot-dryers

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post
It's easy to picture a PVC header with some lightweight hose or tubing that will attach to the header with multiple stations and a PC fan from RadioShack. It does not take much air movement and no heat needed in the cold dry Rockies if you just leave them overnight. Maybe attach the manifold to the fan with a block of wood with holes that match the PVC pipe on one side and a different size hole on the other for the fan. Use wood screws to mount the fan and some bathroom fittings to give the PVC-wood block attachment a finished look. Time Money?
Too much rigmarole.

1. Buy a plastic flexible funnel from Trash Auto/Malwart.



2A. hold the fan in there whilst a helper duct tapes,

or,

2B hold the fan in there and spritz expansion-seal foam around it.

3 wire plug.

done.

Whether or not TSA will let you board an airplane with one of ^those in your checked luggage is anyone's guess.     But, if you use a 12V muffin fan you can use it in your car.

post #16 of 19

I use the Hotronic system with an Intuition liner and a boot glove on really cold days.  I'm usually out bell 2 bell at least 5 days a week and can't afford to have my feet cold.  My foot circulation is poor and I suffered a lot until I solved the problem.  I store my boots on a boot dryer every night and always use a fresh sock.  My socks are very thin and my boots fit very well.  I don't buckle them tightly and don't get my circulation cut off.  I don't ever have to unbuckle them in between runs.  Battery life on my M4 batteries has been good.  I had one go bad and sent it back.  Hotronics sent me a replacement.  I have 2 sets of batteries and have heating elements installed in 4 sets of boots.  I have wired power into my locker and plug in my batteries and video camera every night.  My feet don't seem to get wet.  I rarely turn the power up past the first setting and my feet feel neutral.  I don't think my feet sweat much, but they would if I was to turn the heat up enough to actually feel it. 

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiing-in-Jackson View Post

The key to warm feet is a dry liner. 

 

Skiers come in and ask for boot warmers and they've been skiing in a sopping wet liner for X days.  The thought is drying one's boots each night is a completely new concept.

 

Every boot I sell, I show the skier how to remove and put back in the liner.  It is super easy (look for a how-to thread shortly)!  I suggest boot dryers to every customer, but explain that they really only work well when the liner is removed from the shell.  Water trapped between the liner and shell just doesn't get dried went your boots are really wet.  Often the mesh lining next to the sock feels dry, only to have the foam/insulation still completely wet underneath.

 

For best results, take out the liner and use boot driers.  You'll be amazed.  The most ski boot liners have plenty enough insulation to keep the average foot warm.  The liner just has to be dry. 


 

Not always-I am religous about putting my Falcon 10's on my Peet boot dryer(or yank the liners) when I come of the mountain-these things start out toasty and dry-heck I will leave them on the dryer for days sometimes, but when the temps are around zero. I lose feeling in my toes and it really sucks to have to stop in the lodge and warm em up (hurts like hell too). I have a bony foot with a couple of pressure points, and the Falcons are just not very warm (thin liners)

 

Just saying that some of us cold feet folk take very good care of their boots and still suffer on really cold days and need a bit extra-I am looking to get some Hotronics.

 

post #18 of 19

I just use the .50 dollar foot warmers.

 

They work fine but do not buy ones that are uneven for obvious reasons. 

post #19 of 19

I am tall and skinny and always have cold feet and hand.

Dry feet is not the problem as first I ski in colorado and also never sweat. I inspect my boot quite often and never found water in them

I just have bad circulation.

Cold feet is always the problem as we do a lot of the night skiing. it could be very cold -10 , -15F is common

We go very fast (60+mph) so my boot are very very tight and it get even worth for the blood circulation.

 

I bought the hotronic and they are ok but not as warm as I would like.

I tried the boot warmer but they did not work very well (As mentioned my feet are dried and it need moisture to start the chemical reaction)

both are barely enough when it is really cold

 

I am thinking to use both

 

the hotronic battery does not last long was is already dead

 

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