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Intermediate Skiier's first time seeking ski gear

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

So I am not a novice skier, been skiing for about 8 years, but I have been renting skis and boots the entire time. I am looking at buying my own equipment and I would like to know what is best for me.

 

About myself

-Black diamonds are no problem

-5'7 160 lbs

 

I am looking for the best ski gear website for new and also used skis. Right now, since I am tight on money, I would like to buy used gear.

 

I am just wondering if this

http://www.skitruck.com/product_listing.php?subcat=67

Is a good deal.

Please reccomend me good gear to look for (casual skier who skis on "normal" slopes, not racing, just for "normal" slopes.and also a good website, thanks.

 

Also one last thing, what height skis should I get for an intermediate-advanced skier?

 

In good, I mean best bang for the buck, I would rather not spend more than 400$ in total for a used pair of skis, poles, and boots and bindings.

 

thanks

post #2 of 15

My advice is go see a good bootfitter and buy the best boots you can afford.  Then rent skis and poles for the rest of the year.  Next year buy skis and poles.  Boots are the most important investment you can make.

post #3 of 15

Replying to you based on your stated budget is tough, but in your shoes, I would go into shops and try on a variety of boots to determine if your foot is narrow, medium, wide whatever and what feels good but more importantly what fits correctly. Once you have a good idea of what boot works best for your foot, wait until January to start shopping the internet for them. I use www.thefind.com to look for specific items. Boots bought between Jan-March will be hundreds less than from the store in Dec. My sister scored a great deal on some boots from www.levelninesports.com but she knew the brand fit her foot well, she bought the correct width and still spent $100 to have it fitted better.

Boots are expensive.

Regarding the ski length, something about eye level high will likely be best for you. Google a cm to inches converter to see what length range your looking for and then do some research (Google again) when you come across skis that interest you. There are lots of good used skis out there for $200, but new boots are $300-$600.


Edited by liv2 ski - 10/23/10 at 6:48am
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post

Replying to you based on your stated budget is tough, but in your shoes, I would go into shops and try on a variety of boots to determine if your foot is narrow, medium, wide whatever and what feels good but more importantly what fits correctly. 


 

X2...Boot fitter, then you'll know what works/fits you.

 

Your fitter may have some boots on the cheap, 2 y/o models, be honest with them on budget and they'll hook you up.

 

This time of year is when the local hills have there ski swap flea markets, good place to find a great deal.

post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

My advice is go see a good bootfitter and buy the best boots you can afford.  Then rent skis and poles for the rest of the year.  Next year buy skis and poles.  Boots are the most important investment you can make.

 

X3

 

Boots are critical.  You probably have not had the experience of good fit since you've been renting.  A well fitting boot will feel good all day, give you control beyond what you can imagine, and last you for many more years than any of your other equipment.  You will not be sorry as long as you work with a good bootfitter.  There are lists on this site of recommended fitters, look it up and find one that is local to you.

 

I went for years trying to fit my own boots with no success at all.  It took me one trip to a good bootfitter and all of my problems were solved, even some I didn't know I had.
 

post #6 of 15

That website you linked to does not look like a good source to me. Note the mess in this photo http://www.skitruck.com/about_us.php

 

Ski swaps definitely a good idea.

 

evo.com has used skis.

 

165-170 length for you if you're skiing mostly on groomed trails.

 

X4 on the get boots first, and there goes your budget.    If you really go cheap, then definitely do a swap at a local hill.

 

Give us some idea of where you live roughly and we might have some more ideas for local sources.  Skis online is fine, but NOT boots!

post #7 of 15

x5 on a good boot fitter

 

If you've never had a properly fitted boot, you'll be amazed at how wrong the right boot (size in particular) initially feels. Although you could be one of the very few people with "out of the box" feet, most of us require replacement of the stock insole (not necessarily custom made) and some tweaking of the liner and/or shell (boots are designed for this) before they feel right. Even then, "right" may not be quite a bit different from what you originally had in mind.

 

You will, however, be pleasantly surprised at the marked improvement in your skiing (never mind comfort) the first day out, even on rental skis.

 

An added bonus: properly fitted boots last longer - all liners evenutally pack out to the point where the boots become uncomfortable, but it happens a lot later in a properly fitted boot.

post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys, where can I find a bootfitter? I know there is like Sports Authority an REI in my area, but a bootfitter seems more specialized. Can you recomend a common retailer that has bootfitters?

 

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by LODD2 View Post

Thanks guys, where can I find a bootfitter? I know there is like Sports Authority an REI in my area, but a bootfitter seems more specialized. Can you recomend a common retailer that has bootfitters?

 



I would think the Mtn you ski at would have a few, as I don't know where you live????

Did you try and Google boot fitter in ____________________?

Come on buddy, do a little research.

post #10 of 15

Do not rely on generic bootfitters (REI bootfitters, etc.) because it is a highly technical craft and there are some folks that are fantastic and some that are clueless.  Rely on reports from other skiers.  There are some fitters that work for shops and some that have their own business and do bootfittng exclusively.  There is a list of recommended bootfitters here on Epic somewhere.  Search for it.  If you let people know where you live, they might give you and idea on where to go.  I go 85 miles to get to mine, and I would go triple that distance if I had to.  It's worth it!

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 

Searched, couldn't find that list. I live in Montgomery County, Maryland, if that is any help, thanks.

post #12 of 15

http://www.epicski.com/wiki/boot-fitters-on-epicski

 

Not necessarily all that updated and maintained but good info.

post #13 of 15
post #14 of 15

Good directory gary!

post #15 of 15

This took about 10 seconds,

 

 

Ski Center
4300 Fordham Rd Nw
Washington, DC, 20016
202 966-4474


Ski Chalet of Shady Grove
203 Muddy Branch Rd
Gaithersburg, MD, 20878
301 948-5200


 

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