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Could you tell me some online skiing teaching or instruction vedio sites?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

i am a intermediate amateur.

 

i am going to improve my skiing level .
 

i am now in level 5-7 maybe,i want to be a expert on the all mountain and all terrain .

 

could you tell me some websites about skiing instruction videos ?

 

and tell me some books if possible.

 

thanks .

 

how about the video of Sofa Ski School Skiing DVD Instructional Video NEW .

 

and the book 

Backcountry Skiing: Skills for Ski Touring and Ski Mountaineering (Mountaineers Outdoor Expert Series) [Paperback]

 

All-Mountain Skier : The Way to Expert Skiing - R. Elling; Paperbackdoes it will suit for me? do you know some better  else?

 

 

would you recommend some better video or books? 

 

thanks.

 

 

as i am  Chinese i could not find a true professional coach near my resort .

 

Thanks for your help! 

 

post #2 of 27

Books are in a way a little old fascioned. I have many books myselfe but I find myself picking up much more information here at epic. For good video coaching check out Rick's building blocks video at his site. And talk to him personally here over the net in public or by pm. A good starting point is to post a video of yourself and ask for feedback. That is actually the best thing you can do. 

 

Cannot say anything about the back country book you are refering to. My advice is to buy it. Its not very expensive. And buy other books as well. Books with dvd's are the best. Sofa ski school dvd is something I have been planning to buy myself so I think I can reccomend it to you also.  The sofa The

post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 

thanks for your recommendation and help.

 

i will rec a video this season when i skiing AND POst it .

 

post #4 of 27

Sofa Ski school makes a decent job of taking shortcuts into learning carving, but if you are interested in learning basic skills that will make you an good all around skiier I would suggest Ricks building blocks. (thats a suggestion to Priest, not you TDK smile.gif)



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Books are in a way a little old fascioned. I have many books myselfe but I find myself picking up much more information here at epic. For good video coaching check out Rick's building blocks video at his site. And talk to him personally here over the net in public or by pm. A good starting point is to post a video of yourself and ask for feedback. That is actually the best thing you can do. 

 

Cannot say anything about the back country book you are refering to. My advice is to buy it. Its not very expensive. And buy other books as well. Books with dvd's are the best. Sofa ski school dvd is something I have been planning to buy myself so I think I can reccomend it to you also.  The sofa The

post #5 of 27

There's a ton of books by a wide variety of authors. If your just starting out I'd buy Barnes' encyclopedia of skiing first. It doesn't go too deep into a style but it gives you the most common definitions you will see in most other books. From there it really depends on your preferred skiing style. Harb does good work even though he's a bit political about other programs, LeMaster is another good author, and Lito certainly would be another great source. I could go on for days but I think finding a teacher near you still makes the most sense. It may not be easy but I'm sure if you have a ski slope, you can find a coach or mentor. That is IMO the key ingredient to improving. Talk is a great suppliment to actually performing and refining your movements but can never replace a good mentor.

Good Luck in your search.

post #6 of 27
post #7 of 27

Priest,

Here is a link to a video on the basics of "carving", one aspect of skiing, showing a training exercise . There are some other videos there dealing ski equipment, as well as, Biomechanics and alignment. I hope you find them helpful.   

 

http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=raycantu401#p/u/12/HO0hjU5Vmuo 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #8 of 27

Good stuff Ray, I watched a couple of your vids.

post #9 of 27

I know we're not supposed to mention these guys...but honestly the best online series for instructional purposes is the sequential (ski lessons 1 through 10-though there is a fair amount of repetition)) short video clips posted by youtube user skiwhh. 

 

Politics aside, there's a lot of useful instruction in these 5-7 minutes videos.  Check them out (here's a few)

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPM7gwZwVDU&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/user/skiwhh#p/u/17/s8ZBh_7y9y4

 

Still none of this bests getting out with a quality instructor for actual on snow instructions-but, for quick online youtube stuff, it's the most focused short videos I've come across.

 

Liam

 

post #10 of 27

Good skiing including some drills here...

 

  http://www.youtube.com/user/MountVacation#g/u

 

Mouseover each video to see the full title. It's a 1-12 sequence.

post #11 of 27

SkiMango,

Thanks, nice to hear you enjoyed some of the videos...Do let me know if you have any questions about the material presented or how it could be presented in a clearer manner.

 

Ray


Edited by RayCantu - 10/22/10 at 8:12pm
post #12 of 27

Ray--what school/system is that? In your system your inside ski seems to support your weight at slower speeds. It's definitely not CSIA, and from the PMTS lesson I took it's also not PMTS. 

 

I liked your demos. I'm not sure if I can apply it in my ski school as weighting the inside ski is not currently a general skiing best practice in CSIA (aside from during specific drills)--I think there's also a need for flagging speed control issues if your learner's weight isn't on the outside ski when they invariably bring themselves to terrain currently beyond their comfort level. That said, I can imagine how the technique will look once you start skiing at faster speeds... if those guys in your "Carving Aspen" video are any indication. Wowza.

post #13 of 27

As a slow-speed drill I think this exercise is fine.  It would be interesting to see what this instructor would say to do as the student ramps up the speed and intensity.

 

Mike

post #14 of 27



I think he does this only for the drill.  I listened to the video again and between 2:50 and 3:50 he talks to this.  Closer to 3:50 he talks about how at speed the "in-rigger" will close the gap with the outside leg.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Ray--what school/system is that? In your system your inside ski seems to support your weight at slower speeds. It's definitely not CSIA, and from the PMTS lesson I took it's also not PMTS. 

post #15 of 27

It looks like an interesting alternative to the snow plow.  Notice the "in-rigger" isn't carving.  I wonder if it would lead to skiers not carving the inside ski, keeping too more weight than they should on the inside ski, and banking.  Every method has it's potential problems, especially if student's don't return for more lessons. 

 

Ray, have you got an example of higher end lessons?

post #16 of 27

http://www.yourskicoach.com/YourSkiCoach/Your_Ski_Coach_Home.html

 

Priest, this is a link to Rick Schnellman's site. He is the coach tdk6 refers to.

I spent a week training with Rick. I have skied for 45 years. And the time with him revolutionized my technique. 

We went through all the basics, beginning with balance on skis. His approach is particularly effective because it progresses step by step, with drills demonstrating each new skill. And, as the name suggests, you will "build" on each skill learned. The videos show very clearly what is being taught.

Rick is a very fine individual as well.

Highly recommended.

Best of luck.

David

post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post



I think he does this only for the drill.  I listened to the video again and between 2:50 and 3:50 he talks to this.  Closer to 3:50 he talks about how at speed the "in-rigger" will close the gap with the outside leg.



Yes, its a drill called Gorilla turns, used to introduce counter and hip angulation.

post #18 of 27

Jamt,

 

I thought the Gorilla turns are when you have a wide stance and use your upper body to turn.  Cowboy turns are closer but are an on edge (both), wide stance turn.  In this drill you are carving one ski at a time and being supported by the non carving ski.  Yo can see that in the tracks when he demos the edge change (5:35 - 5:50 with a real good view post 6:00).  It looks like he is getting people to feel and align themselves to a high edge carved turn at slow speed; one leg at a time.  To get both skis at that angle takes a bit of speed and momentum.

 

 

Ray,


Nice stuff.  Liked the Carving Aspen videos too.

 

Ken

post #19 of 27

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Ray--what school/system is that? In your system your inside ski seems to support your weight at slower speeds. It's definitely not CSIA, and from the PMTS lesson I took it's also not PMTS. 

 

I liked your demos. I'm not sure if I can apply it in my ski school as weighting the inside ski is not currently a general skiing best practice in CSIA (aside from during specific drills)--I think there's also a need for flagging speed control issues if your learner's weight isn't on the outside ski when they invariably bring themselves to terrain currently beyond their comfort level. That said, I can imagine how the technique will look once you start skiing at faster speeds... if those guys in your "Carving Aspen" video are any indication. Wowza.


Metaphor,

The “In-rigger” progression was developed as  a way to teach what can be referred to as “Pure Carving”. (the strict definition of this would be; The tip middle and tail of the ski passing through the same points in the snow)  It is difficult to teach someone to use only edge and pressure to control the ski as the rotational input component has been so well ingrained from the first day. (see Note below)

To carve a turn the student must commit to the turn and yet be patient and allow it to happen. Many find it difficult to blend these two concepts which seems to be mutually exclusive but are part of the carved turn.

The skier must commit to the turn in order to get a high enough edge angle to allow the ski to carve while at the same time must be patient and inhibit the desire to twist the ski in response to the acceleration they feel as they begin to enter the fall line.

We found that using what we call an "in-rigger" the skier could get the high edge angle (a commitment) at a low speed without compromising the proper body position they would need later to move to more dynamic skiing. Of course once the high edge angle is achieved twisting the ski won't do much even though they may try.

 

The video is from a DVD we gave to our alignment clients after we set up their boots. It is intended to help them better understand the body positions necessary to deal effectively with the loads and forces developed in modern skiing.

 

 

Note: though the speed (a constant) they are traveling is well within their comfort range it is the acceleration (open ended) that they have difficulty with. The exponential component, i.e., 4mph then in a few seconds 8mph then in another few seconds headed towards 16mph is enough data for their mind to extrapolate that 32mph shortly followed by 64mph and 128mph can't be far off so putting on the brakes (skid, twist the ski or whatever you want to call it) is their default position and is better applied sooner rather than later. If you recall they most likely learned the Double Twisting Opposing Skidded Safety Position (DTOSSP or more commonly called the snow plow) on day one.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by mmckimson View Post

As a slow-speed drill I think this exercise is fine.  It would be interesting to see what this instructor would say to do as the student ramps up the speed and intensity.

 

Mike


 

 Mike,

I think the following quote from L&AirC may have cleared this up. If it is still a question let me know. Thanks 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post



I think he does this only for the drill.  I listened to the video again and between 2:50 and 3:50 he talks to this.  Closer to 3:50 he talks about how at speed the "in-rigger" will close the gap with the outside leg.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

It looks like an interesting alternative to the snow plow.  Notice the "in-rigger" isn't carving.  I wonder if it would lead to skiers not carving the inside ski, keeping too more weight than they should on the inside ski, and banking.  Every method has it's potential problems, especially if student's don't return for more lessons. 

 

Ray, have you got an example of higher end lessons?


 

Ghost,

It is more of an alternative to the “Railroad Track Drill” used to teach or demo carved turns. The problem with the drill is that with skis at hip width, the skier cannot, at slow speeds achieve high enough edge angles to carve without rotating legs and knees into a position that will not hold up to the loads of dynamic carving. (see min. 1:15 in video)  As speed increases the pressure on the outside ski also increases and weight naturally transfers from the in-rigger to the carving ski.  The inside ski then is free to be placed in a matching position and edged and weighted as needed.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post





Yes, its a drill called Gorilla turns, used to introduce counter and hip angulation.


 

Jamt,

As Ken points out below the “In-rigger Turn” differs in method and purpose from other similar turns we may be familiar with.  


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Jamt,

 

I thought the Gorilla turns are when you have a wide stance and use your upper body to turn.  Cowboy turns are closer but are an on edge (both), wide stance turn.  In this drill you are carving one ski at a time and being supported by the non carving ski.  Yo can see that in the tracks when he demos the edge change (5:35 - 5:50 with a real good view post 6:00).  It looks like he is getting people to feel and align themselves to a high edge carved turn at slow speed; one leg at a time.  To get both skis at that angle takes a bit of speed and momentum.

 

 

Ray,


Nice stuff.  Liked the Carving Aspen videos too.

 

Ken



 

Ken,

I am glad you enjoyed. You are very observant and seem to have a good eye for detail based on your comments. Thanks for your help with some of the clarifications.

Did you have a chance to view any of the “Study of Skiing” videos?  http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=raycantu401#p/u/2/k4n3oJbx9UM  If so I would be interested in your thoughts.

Thanks 

post #20 of 27

i hope you are still reading this far because here are the best explanatory vids out there...i am happy to find these stil available. I bet Italiano is not your mother tongue but that don't matter.

 

Bronzo: From the basic rotation forces applied to the feet ( Steering ) on FLAT skis in a wedge while rising and sinking and  facing mostly where you are going or about to go... A snowplow/wedge is the basis for every good skier - especially when cruising a ridge line looking for the secret entrance to the bowl.

 

Argento: Steering of the feet while your body goes along for the ride (Projection ) combines with edging during the down phase and requires more upper/lower body separation.

Thus begats the Rotation/Angulation/Projectin STEW which simmers and ferments for 100 days  ... and gives higher edge angles and some really nice narrow skidded turns.

Oro: The rising becomes developed as Projection of your corpus ahead and across the arc of the turn and the sinking evolves out of the swamp into SERIOUS Angulation which produces really high edge angles...WHICH ALMOST NEGATE THE ROTATION OF THE FEET- although this force is always present to some degree and is ready to sproing into action when needed and save your ass because Your Velocity Has Doubled because they ain't much skiddin' no more...and the g-force meter has gone off the scale.

Pressure Control is the next term you'll come across here: Keep the tac in the black, jack - because the High Side Wang-Ho Into The Trees is out there in the shadows waiting for the unwary.

 

http://www.amsao.it/main.php?curr_liv=2&curr_id=71&prec_liv=1&prec_id=33&lang=it&sotto_livelli=&tip=19

 

i found they only worked in flash player...

 

Raycantu's link to Bill Thistle's Pure Carve exercise: This is great fun to try and should be part of every good skier's experience...  ( anybody know him - I want more video of the smooooth ambient skier in blue at the vid's end )


Edited by g-force - 10/24/10 at 12:38am
post #21 of 27

 

Quote:
  

Did you have a chance to view any of the “Study of Skiing” videos?  http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=raycantu401#p/u/2/k4n3oJbx9UM  If so I would be interested in your thoughts.

 

 

Ray,

I was short of time yesterday but did skim through a couple of them. I'm looking forward to going through all of them in order and detail.  I was very impressed with what I did see and appreciate all the effort you put in to it.  It isn't an easy task.  Hope to go through them with my morning coffee starting this week. 

 

At first blush, your Study of Skiing titles need additional info in the titles.  I didn't notice a way to figure out what was in each chapter.

 

Ken

post #22 of 27

Ken,

Thanks, I have been meaning to make a index, I'll work on it as it will add value to them and make the info more useable.

post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

 

 

 

Ray,

I was short of time yesterday but did skim through a couple of them. I'm looking forward to going through all of them in order and detail.  I was very impressed with what I did see and appreciate all the effort you put in to it.  It isn't an easy task.  Hope to go through them with my morning coffee starting this week. 

 

At first blush, your Study of Skiing titles need additional info in the titles.  I didn't notice a way to figure out what was in each chapter.

 

Ken



Ken,

Just want to let you know the http://skiherenow.blogspot.com/  has the first 4 video chapters with some content information for each. Let me know if that is helpful.

I will let you know when other chapters are ready. You can also leave comments there as well.

Ray 

post #24 of 27

L&AirC,

Video chapters 5 and 6 with indexes are now on http://skiherenow.blogspot.com/       

Hope you enjoy the information.

 

Thanks for the input,

Ray

post #25 of 27

I'm up to chapter 7.  I'm really enjoying it so far.  I'll go through it one more time and take notes to get back to you with. 

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

I'm up to chapter 7.  I'm really enjoying it so far.  I'll go through it one more time and take notes to get back to you with. 



Chapter 7 thru 11 with indexes are now on this pageth thi this page http://skiherenow.blogspot.com/p/chapters-1-to-6.html 

 

Also a question about the way Movement Analysis is viewed is here http://skiherenow.blogspot.com/2008/08/movement-analysis-ma-what-is-your.html

   l

 How do you look at MA?

post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your recommendation and the link, but  i am in China , Browsing some foreign websites such as Youtube ,Facebook is prohibited . 

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