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Ski lock

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Can someone recommend a ski lock for securing your skis to a rack when you are away? Looking for something small and light which would easily fit in my pocket. Once again, light and compact, just looking for some basic deterrence... A friend of mine has a small wire lock which he threads thru his bindings but I cant seem to find it anywhere. Never had my skis stolen but it would definitely give me some peace of mind when in the lodge, especially on a busy day in a resort you are not familiar with.
post #2 of 20

a yapping Chihuahua?

post #3 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgbudz View Post

 A friend of mine has a small wire lock which he threads thru his bindings but I cant seem to find it anywhere. Never had my skis stolen but it would definitely give me some peace of mind when in the lodge, especially on a busy day in a resort you are not familiar with.

 

Google "Kryptonite R4"*

 

 

 

 

 

*(my naming of a lock that fits the description should in no way be interpreted as a recommendation of such a lock)

post #4 of 20

The Kryptonite locks seem to have the best cables, but the cable is thicker than the cheaper Recoiler.  For that reason, it also is shorter and this may or may not be an issue for you.  I've got the Recoiler and have used them for years.  They're enough to keep away most thieves as long as you don't spend 3 hours in the bar at night.  I once found where someone had tried to cut the cable while I was inside and didn't succeed in time.  The cable still has the kink in it from that. 

post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 

I found this lock which seems to be the smallest: http://www.masterlock.com/product_details/CableLocks/4603D. Its definitely pocket sized but still a bit big in my opinion. Maybe I will strap it to my boot or something.

 

It would be cool if someone designed a lock maybe the size of chapstick? It could even be charged so when the cable is cut it could set off an audible alarm. Now that would be cool.

post #6 of 20

Another Master Lock is here.  Seems longer and thicker than the above-mentioned one.  I'd ignore the prices and go with the thickest cable that you can live with the length.  I like the longer length because it gives me more options on where to secure the skis. 

post #7 of 20

I usually buy "snowboard" locks as they're smaller and fit in a pocket better.   Cable length is pretty short, so I have to lock my skis at the end of a rack.

 

http://tinyurl.com/2ujyzb8

post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
 I once found where someone had tried to cut the cable while I was inside and didn't succeed in time.  The cable still has the kink in it from that. 


I had a lock change combinations on me once and I couldn't get my skis off the rack.  Went to maintenance and borrowed a bolt cutter.  It wouldn't cut the cable, and this was a thin cable.  It did however cut where the cable attached to the lock.

post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

I usually buy "snowboard" locks as they're smaller and fit in a pocket better.   Cable length is pretty short, so I have to lock my skis at the end of a rack.

 

http://tinyurl.com/2ujyzb8



Is the plastic hard enough on that? It seems like you could jam a screwdriver in there and not even worry about cutting the cable?

 

I've been looking at that lock, due to its compact size, but the plastic shell worries me.

post #10 of 20

It's just a deterrent.  I don't have that exact lock, but have had a few plastic small locks like it.  They're fine, better then no lock.  People will move on to another unlocked pair of skis before they try to bust your lock is my theory.

post #11 of 20

I'm not sure of the design of the typical plastic wire recoil locks commonly sold for ski / snowboards - but I would guess that the plastic case is just a "case", and shattering or prying it open will not make it fall apart - I would think the internal locking mechanism would still be intact.  I could be wrong though.  I've used them on my skis for the past few years.

post #12 of 20

I know this does not fit your compact requirements, but I like this one.

 

http://www.masterlock.com/product_details/CableLocks_CombinationCableLocks_PresetCombination/1519D

 

What I can do is in the morning I pick out where I am going to eat lunch and leave my cable lock there, attached to something.

It's there when I need it and I don't haul it around all day.

 

Just another option.

 

Full line of locks: http://www.masterlock.com/search/?q=cable+locks

post #13 of 20

I don't really think a larger cable is much more of a deterrent.  They can just remove your brake and leave the cable and brakes behind.  I have one of these, it also holds poles securely.  Masterlock used to sell them.  I'm thinking there is still a market for this.

 

0126091642.jpg

 

The metal bracket between the skis and poles slides back and forth across the cables so you move it, put your poles in, move it back then close the rest of it around your skis and lock it all up by running the cable lock through an eye on the end

post #14 of 20

Yeah, I have one of those laying around somewhere, came with some other lock set.  Might be a nice addition if your cable is short.  I think the original thing it came with was a plain combo and cable, but the total set up was sort of bulky for your pocket.  I used that back at Camelback when I could leave the lock at the base lodge all day, because there wasn't a lot of other places I might stop (pre-Glen Lodge and at some point when the summit cafeteria was always a mob scene).  Now that I am in a more spread out environment (lockers at one lodge, lunch at another and restrooms at many places) I need something that stays with me.  (Of course, the only other people using locks here are the tourists....)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I don't really think a larger cable is much more of a deterrent.  They can just remove your brake and leave the cable and brakes behind.  I have one of these, it also holds poles securely.  Masterlock used to sell them.  I'm thinking there is still a market for this.

 

0126091642.jpg

 

The metal bracket between the skis and poles slides back and forth across the cables so you move it, put your poles in, move it back then close the rest of it around your skis and lock it all up by running the cable lock through an eye on the end

post #15 of 20

^^^ Most of the places I ski have one base lodge so I usually leave it there. I'll even leave my cat tracks locked on the cable at the base lodge when I end up using then due to crappy parking spots.   The ski/pole holder isn't really any more bulky than a camera or an iPhone though.

post #16 of 20

Most ski racks have hundreds of like-new skis just sitting there for the taking without being locked up.  Your lock only has to be marginally better than that to make the thief take the path of least resistance.

 

I've used the Kryptonite lock for years.  It works reasonably well, and fits in my pocket easily.  The coiling spring tends to fail, at which point you're left with a functional lock that doesn't auto-coil.  But what do you want for ~$10?

 

BTW, I'm on my third lock.  The first one was stolen.  Seriously, it was at Spring Mountain near Philly, I locked up my skis to go in for lunch, and while I was in the lodge the thieves stole the lock. Fortunately, they left the skis.

post #17 of 20

Clearly they were telling you what they thought of your skis!  LOL!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
BTW, I'm on my third lock.  The first one was stolen.  Seriously, it was at Spring Mountain near Philly, I locked up my skis to go in for lunch, and while I was in the lodge the thieves stole the lock. Fortunately, they left the skis.
post #18 of 20

I've used one of those Master lock setups for 20+ years. Agree it's not very pocket friendly, but it's easy to use, and if you have extra loops, you can secure 2 or 3 pairs of skis with one lock - a plus when you ski with kids.

 

I have yet to see a ski lock that can't be defeated with a bolt cutter or even a pair of lineman pliers; they're just a deterrent.

post #19 of 20

The best thing you have going for you is that most skiers are still not locking their skis.  When you're in trouble is when everyone IS locking their skis.  Sort of like locking your car door. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by garylk View Post

I have yet to see a ski lock that can't be defeated with a bolt cutter or even a pair of lineman pliers; they're just a deterrent.

post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post

Most ski racks have hundreds of like-new skis just sitting there for the taking without being locked up.  Your lock only has to be marginally better than that to make the thief take the path of least resistance.

 

I've used the Kryptonite lock for years.  It works reasonably well, and fits in my pocket easily.  The coiling spring tends to fail, at which point you're left with a functional lock that doesn't auto-coil.  But what do you want for ~$10?

 

BTW, I'm on my third lock.  The first one was stolen.  Seriously, it was at Spring Mountain near Philly, I locked up my skis to go in for lunch, and while I was in the lodge the thieves stole the lock. Fortunately, they left the skis.



I guess thats a benefit of buying K2s 

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